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Thread: Starting solids

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    38

    Default Starting solids

    Hi all. My 4 month old is a snacker- she nurses every 1-2 hours during the day. She will empty one side in 5 minutes and be done.

    She is also a bottle hater and has given my stay at home husband a hard time for the last 6 weeks I've been back at work.

    We will both be off work for the summer but starting in September baby will go to daycare with a stay-at-home mom. I want that to go as smoothly as possible, so I have some questions about starting solids..

    Should we start earlier than the recommended 6 months since we've had these issues and baby isn't getting enough to eat when I'm working? She displays all the readiness signs.

    Do you have a recommended book for introducing solids? We'd like to use real foods, not the baby food in jars.

    Would it be wise this summer to train her to only drink from the bottle/cup during the day and maybe only nurse her at night?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    COUGARTOWN Baby! From here on in!
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    16,077

    Default Re: Starting solids

    Your 4 month old can sit unassisted? Because that is one of the KEY signs of readiness. And there is a book about Baby Led solids. Which is a method that feeds only whole real foods. But I would NOT try to up the timeline on when you start feeding your EBF baby solids. 4month olds for the most part are NOT ready and just because she waits for you doesn't mean she isn't getting enough to eat.

    Way too lazy for formula

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    10,754

    Default Re: Starting solids

    So baby is now, 4 months old, and in a couple months, you will be home for a couple months and can nurse your baby instead of pumping/bottles, and then she will not be going to daycare until she is about 9 months old? If I have the timeline right, I guess I am not understanding how starting solids "early" will help?

    I agree with djsmom. If you want to use real foods, not pureed, very liquidy baby foods, wait a bit to get to the time babies are typically ready for the introduction of solids, which is usually around 6 months old but may be considerably later for some babies.

    Also be prepared for your child to not take in anything significant as far as solids for many months. How much a child will eat as far as solids varies tremendously, and it is unpredictable. In any case, the recommendation is that a child's primary nutrition for the first year is breastmilk or formula. Primary in this case means approaching 100%, not a simple majority. Of course again, this will vary baby to baby.

    I also liked the baby led solids book, (called baby led weaning) I did not read it until our third baby and solid introduction certainly went smoothest with her. Another very good book that takes a fascinating look at the overall subject of food intake, growth and health in babies and young children is My Child Won't Eat.

    Here is a pretty good article about readiness. I will also say, my middle child had all the readiness signs before 6 months, and even so, and even though we certainly offered, he ate almost no solids until he was 14 months old. : http://kellymom.com/nutrition/starti...s/solids-when/

    Would it be wise this summer to train her to only drink from the bottle/cup during the day and maybe only nurse her at night?
    Only to ensure baby takes a cup or bottle when she goes to daycare at 9 months old? In my opinion, no. Here is why- There is no way that your baby's behavior at 4 months as far as bottles, nursing patterns, or anything else is predictive of how she will behave at 9 months. Also such an action would entail actively encouraging your child to wean from the breast. Unless you want to wean your baby this summer, I think it makes much more sense to relax, enjoy the time with your baby and just nurse over the summer. It is often difficult to maintain a breastfeeding relationship when a mom is back to work, for multiple reasons. Having a summer to "just nurse" could be very helpful in keeping the breastfeeding relationship in good shape longer term. Plus, no pumping, no bottles, no hassle all summer sounds pretty good.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; March 22nd, 2017 at 11:28 PM. Reason: Clarified something. Too rushed when first posted

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: Starting solids

    Thank you guys- I'll pick up that book. I'm just anxious about all these changes, and looking ahead, because at 2 months I was thinking, "she has plenty of time to learn to take a bottle before I go back to work in a month," but nothing changed and she still hasn't improved much.

    I know waiting for me doesn't always mean she didn't have enough to eat, but she will start getting cranky/crying an hour or two before I get home and won't stop, so it seems like she must be hungry.

    No she can't sit independently. The sign I read was that she can hold up her head well when held in a sitting position. But I will wait.

    Yes nursing all summer seems like the easiest thing to do, but will also be a hassle if she still wants to nurse every hour. I'm not comfortable bf in public, so I have to be able to find a private spot wherever I am.. every hour. Traveling will be especially hard- I will be taking at least 2 flights this summer with her (to visit family) that will be 6-8 hours. So I'll have to nurse 5-6 times right next to a stranger or in the plane's bathroom.

    But you're right, I shouldn't worry about it right now and I don't want her to wean early.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    10,754

    Default Re: Starting solids

    No one is comfortable nursing in public...at first. Like anything else, it takes doing it over and over to get more comfortable with it. Also I am not sure what percentage of moms are comfortable with public nursing in all situations. A pretty small amount, I suspect. I always felt differently about it depending on where I was. In other words, no need to feel comfortable nursing in public to nurse in public.

    In my experience airplanes are actually one of the easier places to nurse in public. Most people on airplanes are trying in one way or another to put a bubble of privacy around themselves and return the favor to others. Also the way you are positioned makes your seatmate the person who is least likely to "see anything" unless they really try. And trust me, everyone around you will appreciate the (usually) more comfortable and thus, more quiet nursing baby over the baby who is screaming due to ear pain.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; March 23rd, 2017 at 08:13 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    COUGARTOWN Baby! From here on in!
    Posts
    16,077

    Default Re: Starting solids

    Having been on a plane with a baby and an older toddler that nursed, it was a god send. Really. Having him right there-even when I had to buy a seat for him- I could just lift the arm rest and nurse him. Try to get a window seat if you are worried about it. Then he will be tucked away and only ONE stranger if any will be able to view anything.

    Way too lazy for formula

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