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Thread: What's with all the squirming??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    12

    Default What's with all the squirming??

    Hi all,

    I have an almost five week old and he just started to do this thing where he will squirm and wiggle all around when he is nursing. He starts out the feeding just fine, calm and relaxed, just eating along then it seems when he gets tired and starts to fall asleep he tries to maybe keep himself awake with wiggling around his whole body, kicking his legs, waving his arms around, tugging on my nipple, unlatching and then getting really mad about that and trying to vigorously find the nipple again and latching back on only to do it all again. I know he is getting milk bc I can see him swallowing and sometimes when he unlatches milk comes out of his mouth. He isn't choking or gagging so I don't think he is having an issue with the flow rate, esp since most of the feed he is nursing just fine. This is really frustrating bc I want to make sure he gets a full belly and I also don't want him fighting sleep if that's what this is about. Any ideas? Is he just not wanting to sleep and so he puts up a big fuss? I just got finished nursing him and when he seemed to calm down like he had his fill, I popped him in the swing and he is fast asleep now...Does anybody elses babies do this?? He only started to do this recently.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    460

    Default Re: What's with all the squirming??

    When you nurse, are you laid back on the couch with baby on top of you or are you sitting more upright with baby in like a cradle hold?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    24,794

    Default Re: What's with all the squirming??

    This sort of behavior could be a lot of different things. Maybe the baby is temporarily dissatisfied with the flow speed, and is trying to encourage a faster flow. Or maybe he's got a full tummy but still wants to suck, and can't quite decide whether to stay latched or let go. Maybe he's trying to soothe himself to sleep in a quirky way. Maybe he's trying to poop or pass gas.

    I wouldn't worry about this at all. Just roll with it, try some different positions, try switching him to the other breast... But don't worry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    10,754

    Default Re: What's with all the squirming??

    My oldest went through a period where he just could not nurse to sleep, he would squirm, pop off and cry, etc. so finally I decided I would nurse him and then walk him around as he fussed to sleep on my shoulder.
    As long as baby is gaining ok and nursing is comfortable for you, that indicates all is going well. Babies do not need a full belly every time they nurse anymore than adults need to eat to fullness every time they eat. If baby is gaining well, you can be sure baby is getting enough to eat overall.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    12

    Default Re: What's with all the squirming??

    Usually I have him laying cross my lap, his belly tilted up towards mine in a cross cradle kind of hold so I can have more control of his head, so its like a laid back cross cradle and sometimes we do the side lye. I have tried the different positions but he squirms with them all.

    Thanks for the input and encouragement guys. I know he is getting enough to eat, he is gaining weight and all, it's just a little frustrating to nurse him and ten mins in he is wiggling all around. Idk whether he is full or what. I have tried switching sides bc maybe he wants a faster flow but honestly the flow is still pretty fast on the side he is on, he often makes the milk spill out of his mouth when he pulls off, not a huge mouthful but enough to spill out.

    I think I have narrowed it down to him needing to burp and being sleepy but not wanting to fall asleep. Sometimes he falls right asleep and doesn't fight it and other times he fights sleep with everything he has in him.

    Could it also be that recently we have introduced the bottle and he doesn't want to work as hard at the breast anymore and wants it easy? The bottle nipple size is the slowest flow kind for newborns, premies and breastfed babies and he does have to work a bit but I am sure not as much as the breast. He takes the bottle just fine. He still sucks the proper way for the breast, just the wiggling around has started.

    Whatever the cause I hope he grows out of it. My nipples aren't sore from him so at least he is still latching good and getting milk, he's just wanting to break out the moves when he is doing it lol...
    Last edited by @llli*brittanyg; October 17th, 2015 at 12:50 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    10,754

    Default Re: What's with all the squirming??

    I have no idea if the bottle feedings might be causing the squirming. But bottles are always a potential for trouble, they can cause several different possible issues. The more bottles there are overall, and the longer they are given, the more likely they will eventually cause issues with breastfeeding.

    To avoid the worst bottle issues, there are a few things you can do. First, limit bottles to those that are necessary. If you are separated from baby, baby needs to be fed with bottles (or a bottle alternative.) The same is true if baby needs supplements due to poor gain. But there is seldom any other reason they are needed. If you are anticipating needing them due to an upcoming separation, and wish baby to have "practice" bottles, those can be infrequent and small, as they are only for practice. Also, if separations are short, baby may not need to be fed at all by caregiver.

    When baby gets bottles, it is important mom protects her milk production by pumping, probably around the same time baby gets the bottle, at least approximately. Hand expression can also work, depending on how well your body responds.
    Bottles should be kept to a normal size feeding. 2-3 ounces at most, usually, although if baby wants less at a time that is of course fine as well. If baby seems to always want more than 3 ounces, there may be an issue with how the bottle is given.
    Bottles must be given in a very specific way, called paced bottle feeding, in order to try to avoid bottle preference/breast refusal. Paced bottle feeding means baby and bottle are held a very specific way and the caregiver makes sure baby takes pauses as is normal with breastfeeding. This also slows the feeding down to be more what is normal nursing sessions duration (or even slower than normal.)Slow flow nipples help but type of nipple itself is much less important than how the bottle is given.

    Have you tried leaning back (aka biological nurturing) positioning? Because this allows baby to have more of their body in direct contact with mom, and thus to feel more secure on mom and (more or less) on their tummy, it can be very effective in reducing overt squirminess, misdirected kneading, and "breast fighting" behavior. It is also helpful if the flow is perhaps too fast for baby. This is a position that is endlessly adjustable, so you can play around with it until you find positions that feel right to both of you.

    Paced bottles: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UH4T70OSzGs

    Laid back nursing position: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfeeding.pdf

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: What's with all the squirming??

    Thank you for the bottle information.

    I have tried biological nursing but I think my breasts are too large for it. I have to hold my breast so the weight of it doesn't make the nipple sip out of his mouth and when he gets latched on he can't breath bc his face is squished into my breast and it's just very frustrating, I might be doing it wrong, I am not sure. But the way I do it now is I cradle him and I lean back some so that he is resting on me but also I still have to support him. Majority of the time he is fine but once or twice a day, usually at night he tugs on my nipple, kicks his legs, pulls his head back etc. Maybe he is just fussy from a growth spurt.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    24,794

    Default Re: What's with all the squirming??

    You might want to try rolling up a washcloth (or two) and tucking it under your breast. Sometimes that's enough to prop you into the right position.

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