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Thread: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

  1. #1
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    Default On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    Hello,

    I posted a thread a few days ago about having a fussy baby at the breast after introducing 1 night time bottle...

    Today I went to see the a lactation and infant care provider in my area to talk about my problems. When we weighed my daughter (who just turned 4 months yesterday!) and looked at her growth curve, it turns out she has gained only 13g per day (0.45 oz per day) in the last month. She said that 15g per day is the minimum normal weight gain, and because she is borderline not gaining weigh properly, that I need to consider supplementing with formula, or take steps to increase my milk supply.

    Her main recommendation was to nurse, and then supplement at the end of each nursing session with 2 oz of formula. This way my breasts will continue to be stimulated, but baby will have enough to eat. And this way she will resume normal weight gain. The argument being that I since I will return back to work in about 4 weeks, it will be difficult to be able to increase milk supply enough so that I have enough to pump at work, and this way the option I would most likely be following would be to give formula for day-time feedings while I am at work, and nurse when I am at home with my baby.

    Her second recommendation was to pump after every nursing, or as frequently as I could to increase the milk supply, but she only recommended I do this if I think it's feasible to pump multiple times per day at work, and if I were not to tired to do it.

    She (and my husband) both suspect that I am too tired, and this is why my milk supply might be low. I worked during the first 2 months of maternity leave - I am a scientist and was writing papers while taking care of a newborn. Not a good plan, but I feel like I have no choice, or I may not be able to continue in my career path. The stress of the papers, some conflicts I had to deal with during those early months, and the lack of sleep probably all contributed to low milk supply. Also, we went on an international trip about a month ago, and some of these problems with breastfeeding have become worse since the trip.

    I cried all the drive home, not knowing what to do. I feel terrible that my baby has been going hungry - her fussiness is probably because she was still hungry, and I feel devasted to give up my ideal situation for breastfeeding. My husband once asked me what were my reasons for breastfeeding, and if it were about me or if it were about my baby. This is a question I thought about again today. I want to give my baby good nutrition, and although breast milk is better, formula is not bad, it's just not the best. I also want to have a special relationship with my baby, but for the past 3 or 4 weeks, the breastfeeding relationship has not been positive. Baby has not been enjoying breastfeeding - she is hungry at the end of each session, and is not gaining weight as she should. So I am being selfish in insisting on this relationship? Am I doing this for my baby, or am I doing this for myself? A bit of both I suppose, but I cannot continue to ignore my baby's cry for more food.

    The person I saw today also said that perhaps one of the reasons my baby doesn't sleep long naps during the day anymore (she started sleeping only 15-60 min naps after our international trip, but she was sleeping 1-2 hour naps before) or long stretches at night is because she is hungry.

    What I did when I got home was to nurse baby, and then give her 2oz of pumped milk I had in the freezer. I then pumped after nursing, to prepare the next 2 oz supplement for the next feeding. I think I can try to keep this up for just a few days. I am exhausted, and don't know if my efforts will be worth it.

    My question to the forum is:
    1) On average how long does it take to increase milk supply? Is it likely I will see a change in 2-3days, or are we talking about a week or more?

    2) If I supplement with formula after each nursing session, do you think it is still possible to maintain the plan to nurse evenings and give formula during the day (in the scenario that baby will accept to nurse after so many bottles...)?

    3) The person I saw said that giving these small supplements after each nursing session might help me get back my milk supply, because I will still stimulate my breasts at each feeding, and there will be a longer delay between nursing sessions. I am nursing probably around 9-10 times per day right now, because baby gets hungry quickly after each small meal. She said if I can increase the time between nursing sessions, my breasts will be fuller, and baby will be more satisfied. I am worried that every oz of supplement gets me further away from having adequate milk supply..... what do you think.

    Thank you for your advice, I really appreciate it.

    Sincerely,
    nsmum

  2. #2
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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    Can you post a complete weight history for us, including birth weight and lowest known weight? It helps if you post it in the following form: age in weeks - weight in kg (or lbs and oz- many moms on the forum are in the US and we're stupidly not metric yet).

  3. #3
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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    Also, I am NOT liking your lactation and infant care provider's advice. (I am not sure what exactly a "lactation and infant care provider" is- is this person a lactation consultant? Does she have an IBCLC degree?)

    Her main recommendation was to nurse, and then supplement at the end of each nursing session with 2 oz of formula.
    That's quite a large supplement. A full feeding for a 4 month old baby is just 2-4 oz. And why supplement with formula when you can use your own milk? You have 4 weeks before you return to work, and if you work on pumping as diligently as a scientist works on her research (), you should be able to get enough milk to fill any supplementing needs.

    The argument being that I since I will return back to work in about 4 weeks, it will be difficult to be able to increase milk supply enough so that I have enough to pump at work, and this way the option I would most likely be following would be to give formula for day-time feedings while I am at work, and nurse when I am at home with my baby.
    This is completely defeatist advice. 4 weeks is plenty of time to boost supply if you can be methodical and diligent and if you are using a good pump. And the way to have enough milk to pump at work is to pump at work. If you forgo workday pumping sessions, yes, you're not going to make much milk at all. If you pump at work, you will maintain supply and maybe even build it if you are pumping often enough and pumping with a good pump. Don't base your idea of what you can pump at work on what you pump after feedings; once you're back at the office you will be pumping instead of nursing and that is going to yield more milk than when the baby mostly empties you out and you just pump the residual.

    Her second recommendation was to pump after every nursing, or as frequently as I could to increase the milk supply, but she only recommended I do this if I think it's feasible to pump multiple times per day at work, and if I were not to tired to do it.

    She (and my husband) both suspect that I am too tired, and this is why my milk supply might be low.
    Pumping after every feeding is excellent advice, if your goal is to build supply. But this stuff about being "too tired" is ridiculous! Milk production does not depend on a mom being well-rested. Which is a good thing, because no new mom on this planet is well-rested. There's no way our species could have survived the Pleistocene if rest were important for milk production. Babies are designed to nurse all day and all night long. That is not maladaptive!

    I worked during the first 2 months of maternity leave - I am a scientist and was writing papers while taking care of a newborn. Not a good plan, but I feel like I have no choice, or I may not be able to continue in my career path. The stress of the papers, some conflicts I had to deal with during those early months, and the lack of sleep probably all contributed to low milk supply. Also, we went on an international trip about a month ago, and some of these problems with breastfeeding have become worse since the trip.
    PLEASE don't beat yourself up for writing papers and traveling. These are great accomplishments when you have a newborn, and they didn't derail breastfeeding- again, being tired does not harm your milk supply. Traveling, under certain circumstances, can, if you are skipping nursing or pumping sessions because of travel. But again, tiredness itself is NOT the problem!

    I cried all the drive home, not knowing what to do.
    I am so sorry. No mom should leave a consult in despair.

    I feel terrible that my baby has been going hungry - her fussiness is probably because she was still hungry, and I feel devasted to give up my ideal situation for breastfeeding.
    I just want to emphasize that we do not yet know that the fussiness is related to hunger. Post that weight history and we may be able to figure that out. Even if the fussiness is related to hunger, it does not mean that you are going to have to give up on your breastfeeding ideal. It might require a lot of work and maybe even some tough choices to make the ideal happen, but you don't have to give up!!!

    My husband once asked me what were my reasons for breastfeeding, and if it were about me or if it were about my baby. This is a question I thought about again today. I want to give my baby good nutrition, and although breast milk is better, formula is not bad, it's just not the best. I also want to have a special relationship with my baby, but for the past 3 or 4 weeks, the breastfeeding relationship has not been positive. Baby has not been enjoying breastfeeding - she is hungry at the end of each session, and is not gaining weight as she should. So I am being selfish in insisting on this relationship? Am I doing this for my baby, or am I doing this for myself? A bit of both I suppose, but I cannot continue to ignore my baby's cry for more food.
    Breastfeeding is NOT a selfish thing to do. There is no more selfless thing in the world than to feed your child from your own body. If you have to supplement, that is okay. But please do not feel like you have been selfish by trying to nurse exclusively! Your husband gets an from me for asking a stupid question. A nursing mom who is in crisis needs support, and that question is undermining.

    The person I saw today also said that perhaps one of the reasons my baby doesn't sleep long naps during the day anymore (she started sleeping only 15-60 min naps after our international trip, but she was sleeping 1-2 hour naps before) or long stretches at night is because she is hungry.
    This is possible. But short naps- a.k.a. cat naps- are normal for many babies.

    What I did when I got home was to nurse baby, and then give her 2oz of pumped milk I had in the freezer. I then pumped after nursing, to prepare the next 2 oz supplement for the next feeding. I think I can try to keep this up for just a few days. I am exhausted, and don't know if my efforts will be worth it.
    This is marvelous. If you could pump 2 oz after nursing, I am not sure why anyone thinks you need to supplement.

    I know firsthand how exhausting combining nursing and pumping can be. So please don't beat yourself up if you can't always pump after every nursing session. You're aiming for the best you can do, not perfection.

    1) On average how long does it take to increase milk supply? Is it likely I will see a change in 2-3days, or are we talking about a week or more?
    Impossible to answer. Every mom is different, and responds differently to her pump, to nursing, to pump frequency, etc. However, with a good double electric pump- hopefully a hospital grade rental with correctly sized shields?- I would estimate that pumping after every nursing session would yield an increase in supply in a week. Maybe not a huge one, if you aren't someone who responds rapidly to pumping. But hopefully measurable!

    2) If I supplement with formula after each nursing session, do you think it is still possible to maintain the plan to nurse evenings and give formula during the day (in the scenario that baby will accept to nurse after so many bottles...)?
    Another impossible to answer question. We know that when babies are mostly fed via bottle, they are more likely to refuse to nurse. And we know that when mom is mostly formula-feeding and has relatively little mi as a result, the baby is more likely to give up on nursing. But we can't predict how your particular baby will respond to the proposed plan.

    3) The person I saw said that giving these small supplements after each nursing session might help me get back my milk supply, because I will still stimulate my breasts at each feeding, and there will be a longer delay between nursing sessions. I am nursing probably around 9-10 times per day right now, because baby gets hungry quickly after each small meal. She said if I can increase the time between nursing sessions, my breasts will be fuller, and baby will be more satisfied. I am worried that every oz of supplement gets me further away from having adequate milk supply..... what do you think.
    This, quite frankly, is bullsh*t, and it makes me very dubious about all the advice you were given. Going longer between nursing sessions is NEVER good for milk supply. Never. Every time you allow your breasts to go a long time without milk removal, you are signalling your body that demand is low and supply needs to be reduced. Making more milk than the baby demands is a waste of metabolic energy and the body is conservative with its energy.

    If you want to build supply, and improve weight gain, the best thing to do is to nurse frequently. 9-10 nursing sessions per day is good. 10-12 would be better, especially if you could get some of them to take place overnight. This is particularly important if you are going to supplement, because supplementing does get you further away from your goal of having enough milk. If you combine supplements with reduced nursing, that's a ticket to making the lactation person's prophecy- that you will only nurse at night and use formula during the workday- come true.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    When baby nursed at the consult for a before and after nursing weight check, what was the result?

    Was the weight check at this appt. on a different scale than baby was weighed on previously?

    How did the lactation consultant arrive at the diagnoses of low milk production, and eliminate as a possibility the many other reasons weight gain might be slower after 3 months of age? Including that that weight gain rate would be 100% normal for some babies?

    How many ounces total per day is the LC telling you to supplement? Because 2 ounces given at every feeding it not supplementing- that is the total you can expect a baby to eat if baby is eating with normal frequency.

    When is your next apt to have baby weighed so that the LCs theory that baby needs so much supplement can be tested?

    Also, necessary and appropriate supplementing does not destroy breastfeeding. Supplementing when it is not needed, or over-supplementing, or supplementing improperly without the precautions to protect/increase milk production and protect a child's ability and desire to nurse at the breast, and without taking whatever steps are needed to solve whatever the underlying issues are (as much as possible) is what will rob you and your child of a breastfeeding relationship.

    Some babies do need supplemental feedings-more than they can get at the breast. These babies can continue to be breastfed as well, with the above precautions taken. And evidence suggests it is beneficial for the baby to continue to nurse even when supplements are required.

    And you are not selfish to want to nurse your child.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; July 22nd, 2015 at 03:07 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    Hello everyone,
    Thank you all for your advice, and sorry for the delay in responding. My baby has a cold, and I have been spending a lot of time with her today and yesterday.

    I saw a midwife today (for something else - for me), and she said that she did find the supplementing to be a little excessive. We weighed my daughter before and after a feeding, and the weight difference was 80g (almost 3 oz). She said this sounded like a very normal feeding and that I should consult with my doctor before going ahead. By chance, we have an appt tomorrow (for baby's 4 month vaccines), so we will talk to the doctor about it then.

    Yesterday and today I supplemented with pumped breast milk, but not all of it was pumped the same day. For one of the feedings, baby refused the supplement, and so I didn't give it to her.

    Sorry to not provide more info.... baby is waking up again, and it takes time to gather all of the weight info, etc, while keeping everything going at home.... Will try to give an update later on today, or perhaps tomorrow. But please know that your responses have helped me reflect more about what it is that I want and what I think is best to do.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    you provided all the info I need to know you have been seriously misguided by the lc you saw. How unfortunate!

    If a baby is capable of transferring 3 ounces at a nursing session, it is very possible baby does not need any supplements, of your pumped milk or anything else. What possibly needs to happen is baby nurses more often.

    Also just from personal exp. Watch out for baby possibly feeling very out of sorts after the 4 month shots. Don't let it throw you if baby has a hard time for a day or so. - crying, sleeping hard, refusing to nurse etc. I am not talking actual dangerous reactions that of course you call doctor about. I am just talking about behavioral things that might concern you given that you are already having concerns re: gain. my kids had a much more pronounced reaction to those 4 months than any others.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    Dear maddieb and mommal,
    I just wanted to thank you again for your comments, and wanted to let you know what has happened in the end. I finally spoke to two midwives who have given me advice that is coherent with what you have said here on the forum and with what I have read in books. The midwife I saw last agrees that I was given some bad advice. As I may have mentioned I don't live in the U.S. anymore, and here where I live people tend to breastfeed only a few months before switching to formula. Unfortunately the bad advice has come in part from my family doctor who is following my daughter and it has been difficult for my husband to accept that the doctor may not have all the best advice when it comes to breastfeeding. Let me just tell you how the situation has turned out. I have decided that when I go back to work, my baby will have formula during the day, and breastfeed while she is with me (morning, evenings nights and weekends). The midwife told me to do at least 4 nursing sessions per day to maintain milk supply. I will also try to pump once a day at work. She told me that if I nurse on weekends this can help increase the supply a bit. I know this is the beginning of weaning, and have been very sad about it for days, but hoping that with the midwives advice I can continue a little while longer. I just made too many mistakes, and things were just too difficult for me. I was having too hard a time dealing with rejection at the breast, fussy baby, and pressure from husband and health care providers. But I hope that this compromise will allow me to enjoy the time I have left with my baby while on maternity leave (I want to have time to play with her and to see her smiling and interact with her beyond breastfeeding ), and that I will be able to keep breastfeeding for several more months even if not exclusively, if all goes well. Thanks again for your advice. It has helped me to move forward. I am not sure, I think my baby is going into a growth spurt - today she has been at the breast every 2 hours i think it will be a tough night ahead... Wish me luck, but if I survive the next couple of days I may have a healthier milk supply thanks to all the extra feedings. Cheers

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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    I'm glad you finally got some good advice from the professionals! For the record, it's common for pediatricians to give bad breastfeeding advice, both abroad and back here in the USA. Pediatricians get a lot of training in how to diagnose and treat disease, but very little in breastfeeding. Doctors get most of their breastfeeding training on the job, and as a result they tend to advise nursing moms to do whatever all the other nursing moms in their practice are doing. When you live in an area where breastfeeding duration is typically very short and most moms are switching to formula... Well, you can see how the doctor's advice is going to push you towards doing the same thing as everyone else!

    It sounds like you've made some decisions, but that those decisions aren't making you very happy...? What would make you happy, at this point? That is, what would your ideal breastfeeding relationship be? I know you're feeling very unhappy about the bad advice, the pressure from other people, and circumstances in general. But it's definitely not too late to make psitive changes, if you want to make them. I'm not trying to pressure you to change your mind- but if you think there might be another path that would make you happier, I want you to get there!

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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*nsmum View Post
    I posted a thread a few days ago about having a fussy baby at the breast after introducing 1 night time bottle...

    Today I went to see the a lactation and infant care provider in my area to talk about my problems. When we weighed my daughter (who just turned 4 months yesterday!) and looked at her growth curve, it turns out she has gained only 13g per day (0.45 oz per day) in the last month. She said that 15g per day is the minimum normal weight gain, and because she is borderline not gaining weigh properly, that I need to consider supplementing with formula, or take steps to increase my milk supply.
    This is only .05oz short of the minimum amount of in the normal range. Which is anywhere from half and oz a day to two oz a day. So IMO you are SO CLOSE. So the advice you LC gave you was really pretty horrible and detrimental. In that by adding in that much formula a day? She is basically setting you up to fail completely. You don't tell someone who is ALMOST THERE to add in 18-20oz a formula A DAY AND to expect to NOT PUMP when they go back to work unless you want there supply GONE and for them to GIVE UP COMPLETELY two weeks after returning to work. Seriously. This is TERRIBLE ADVICE.
    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*nsmum View Post
    Her main recommendation was to nurse, and then supplement at the end of each nursing session with 2 oz of formula. This way my breasts will continue to be stimulated, but baby will have enough to eat. And this way she will resume normal weight gain. The argument being that I since I will return back to work in about 4 weeks, it will be difficult to be able to increase milk supply enough so that I have enough to pump at work, and this way the option I would most likely be following would be to give formula for day-time feedings while I am at work, and nurse when I am at home with my baby.
    Even if you do end up having to combo feed, if you want to be successful at it and you want to maintain your breastfeeding relationship, it's VERY VERY important to pump at work. You need to wrap your mind around the fact that pumping while at work is NOT OPTIONAL even if you decide that formula is. Because if you don't stimulate your breasts? They don't make milk. And there is no way someone whose supply is on the low side can give up stimulating their breasts during the day this early when supply is still so volatile and expect to maintain any supply to feed while together with. You need to plan to pump every 2-3 hours so basically two 15 minute breaks and on your lunch break on an 8hour day AT LEAST. And that milk that gets collected, even if it's not enough gets fed to your baby the next day at daycare and formula makes up the difference. That's what successful combo feeding looks like for a working mother. If you start topping off with 2oz supplements at every feed? And try to blow off pumping at work? It's over. And it doesn't have to be.
    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*nsmum View Post
    Her second recommendation was to pump after every nursing, or as frequently as I could to increase the milk supply, but she only recommended I do this if I think it's feasible to pump multiple times per day at work, and if I were not to tired to do it.
    Given that she thinks you are to exhausted to do this? It's also obviously terrible advice. You should be pumping. And you NEED TO pump multiple times a day at work. That part isn't optional. But how much you pump now should be how much you can afford to and in time frames that aren't affecting anything with your baby. I would build in one session 1st thing in the morning. BEFORE you feed the baby. When you 1st get up to pee. That is when most women yield the most. You have leave that fresh milk out for up to 8 hours. So if you just leave that 1st bottle out? you can use it all day to supplement feeds as needed without having to re-heat milk. Most babies will drink room temperature milk just fine. Beyond that session, while at home, when else can you afford to pump without is causing stress and exhaustion? Right after dinner when your DH is there to hold the baby and you are full? During one of the naps? If you are feeding 9-10 times a day, and you are exhausted Yeah pumping 9-10 times a day is going to stress you out and may actually negatively affect sessions because of your hate association with the pump. Don't let that happen. The pump is the essential key piece in a working mother's arsenal to continue a successful breastfeeding relationship. You need the pump to make this all work. But you don't need to use it every single time you feed. Utilize it while at home to that you CAN continue to supplement with your own milk. So that IF and when you need formula it will only be a certain number of oz hopefully 8-12 to make up what if anything you can't successfully pump at work.
    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*nsmum View Post
    I cried all the drive home, not knowing what to do. I feel devasted to give up my ideal situation for breastfeeding. My husband once asked me what were my reasons for breastfeeding, and if it were about me or if it were about my baby. This is a question I thought about again today. I want to give my baby good nutrition, and although breast milk is better, formula is not bad, it's just not the best. I also want to have a special relationship with my baby, but for the past 3 or 4 weeks, the breastfeeding relationship has not been positive. Baby has not been enjoying breastfeeding - she is hungry at the end of each session, and is not gaining weight as she should. So I am being selfish in insisting on this relationship? Am I doing this for my baby, or am I doing this for myself? A bit of both I suppose, but I cannot continue to ignore my baby's cry for more food.
    Listen. I don't want you to feel bad about something that is actually a pretty primal instinct. We are mammals. We are SUPPOSED to feed our young. And failing at it actually contributes to PPD in a big way. So it's only about you in the fact that your are acting on your instincts to do it. And to the bolded part of this quote, I really would like to point out that this language is false. It's subversive language. Breastfeeding isn't "best". It's NORMAL. And formula isn't "bad" it's substandard. And that's it. That's all there is to it. Formula has it's place. And when used correctly it can save lives. But replacing YOUR MILK with it when you are alive and actually making it, ain't it. Your baby deserves YOUR milk. So do the work to make it for her and don't let ANYONE convince you that doing so is SELFISH. Because anyone who has done it can tell you, there is nothing selfish about breastfeeding. It's WORK. There is no way around that. Even people who have plenty of supply are up feeding around the clock. WE ALL spend the 1st 6-12 weeks in our PJ on the couch doing not much else. That's just how it goes. That is how you find your rhythm. It's a mistake to think that you will give birth and then just pick up your old life and fit your new born into it. That isn't ever a recipe for success. I don't know how much time you have left before you go back but what I suggest you do is have as many nurse ins as you can between now and then. Because it doesn't really sound like you and your baby every did that. Sit around for weeks and just find your rhythm. So wrap your mind around 2-3 days that are around JUST THAT. Wake up in the morning with the goal to be FEED THE BABY. Not feed the baby AND clean the house. Or feed the baby and work. Feed the baby and Pee. Feed the baby and eat. Feed the baby and rest. Feed the baby and watch tv. Stay in your PJs. Stay in bed. Stay skin to skin with the baby. Do those things for 48-72 hours. Find your groove. Have your DH bring home take out. The laundry and dishes will wait. Let that be your priority. So that we can get a real sense of where your shortcomings are in terms of making milk. Vs shortcomings that are being caused by stress, exhaustion and scheduling issues.
    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*nsmum View Post
    The person I saw today also said that perhaps one of the reasons my baby doesn't sleep long naps during the day anymore (she started sleeping only 15-60 min naps after our international trip, but she was sleeping 1-2 hour naps before) or long stretches at night is because she is hungry.
    Or it could also just be that traveling in both directions internationally threw her off. I mean I don't know any adults who travel internationally and don't have it throw off their sleep. Jet lag is real right? I don't assume that it doesn't affect smaller people too.

    So to recap, you were given terrible advice. And I wasn't there so I can't tell if you were given terrible advice because your LC is terrible or if she thought you were looking for permission to fail. But MY assumption of people who come HERE for advice is that they don't want to fail.
    So I am telling you things that I have done and also seen in work for other working mothers in the years I have been here. Don't supplement with formula until you go back to work. And even then, only supplement what you aren't yielding when you pump at work.
    Don't make pumping at work some insurmountable hurdle. Act very matter of fact about it. Its' your right, and it's protected by law. And the reason for that is because employers have not been fair or reasonable about it in the past and THAT is the reason for so many failed breastfeeding relationships. You can pump at work. Insist on it.
    Have a nurse in.
    Don't try to pump after every time you feed. Pump 1st thing in the morning for sure. And then work out other times in the day that will work for you and you can be consistent at.
    Don't give up. You ARE DOING IT. You are making milk for your baby and she is growing. You need to make a bit more. Or eventually supplement. It's not an all or nothing game. But IT WILL BE if you follow that LC advice.
    Good luck. Keep us posted.
    Last edited by @llli*djs.mom; July 30th, 2015 at 10:11 AM.

    Way too lazy for formula

  10. #10
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    Default Re: On the verge of supplementing - need advice

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*nsmum View Post
    Dear maddieb and mommal,
    I just wanted to thank you again for your comments, and wanted to let you know what has happened in the end. I finally spoke to two midwives who have given me advice that is coherent with what you have said here on the forum and with what I have read in books. The midwife I saw last agrees that I was given some bad advice. As I may have mentioned I don't live in the U.S. anymore, and here where I live people tend to breastfeed only a few months before switching to formula. Unfortunately the bad advice has come in part from my family doctor who is following my daughter and it has been difficult for my husband to accept that the doctor may not have all the best advice when it comes to breastfeeding. Let me just tell you how the situation has turned out. I have decided that when I go back to work, my baby will have formula during the day, and breastfeed while she is with me (morning, evenings nights and weekends). The midwife told me to do at least 4 nursing sessions per day to maintain milk supply. I will also try to pump once a day at work. She told me that if I nurse on weekends this can help increase the supply a bit. I know this is the beginning of weaning, and have been very sad about it for days, but hoping that with the midwives advice I can continue a little while longer. I just made too many mistakes, and things were just too difficult for me. I was having too hard a time dealing with rejection at the breast, fussy baby, and pressure from husband and health care providers. But I hope that this compromise will allow me to enjoy the time I have left with my baby while on maternity leave (I want to have time to play with her and to see her smiling and interact with her beyond breastfeeding ), and that I will be able to keep breastfeeding for several more months even if not exclusively, if all goes well. Thanks again for your advice. It has helped me to move forward. I am not sure, I think my baby is going into a growth spurt - today she has been at the breast every 2 hours i think it will be a tough night ahead... Wish me luck, but if I survive the next couple of days I may have a healthier milk supply thanks to all the extra feedings. Cheers
    I was so outraged that I didn't see that you bumped it to give it an update, but I still think that the idea that you are going to be able to maintain supply by nursing four times a day is ludicrous. Really. re-think pumping while at work. Even if you ARE planning on supplementing. You need to stimulate your breasts to mimic actual feedings. It's all supply and demand. If you don't demand the milk, you stop making it.

    Way too lazy for formula

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