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Thread: Looking for a Specialist!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    11

    Default Looking for a Specialist!

    Hi everyone,

    I have PCOS, newly diagnosed Hypothyroidism, had to conceive Isobel through IVF (she is 6 months old now), and have battled immensely with milk supply being very LOW.

    We will be looking to have a second child in about 6 months time, and I would really LOVE to find someone who specialises in low milk supply caused by any of the conditions I have who can help me to make sure I don't have the same milk supply issues with the next baby. If they can help me get my milk supply sorted for Isobel now as well then that would be fantastic. I am only producing around 5ml per breast every 3 hours, if that. So the milk is still there, but just very very low. Isobel is formula fed now, and she simply suckles on me when I put her down for her naps, which is around 4 times a day.

    I don't mind paying someone privately for this expertise, as I was absolutely heart broken having to stop breast feeding Isobel at 2 months!

    I live in Harpenden, Hertfordshire, but am not opposed to travelling to see someone.

    Thanks for your help,
    Leanne

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    24,794

    Default Re: Looking for a Specialist!

    I can't help with a specialist, what with being in the US and all, but I would like to say that in my experience it takes significant time to recover from thyroid dysfunction and you might want to consider putting the baby plans on hold for a little longer. Give yourself time to figure out exactly what your levels should be, what makes you feel good, what makes your body work like it should... In addition to seeing an endocrinologist, I think it makes sense to see an obstetrician. Women who require thyroid hormone replacement when not pregnant typically require increased doses during pregnancy, and having the right levels during pregnancy is important for maintaining the pregnancy and the development of the fetus.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    10,754

    Default Re: Looking for a Specialist!

    I suggest the book Making More Milk. The authors are experts in low milk production, but they live in the US I believe. Dr. Jack Newman (Canada) is another expert source for breastfeeding including low milk production, he has a book or two, and also a great website. You can try contacting any of these people for personal assistance. For in person help, look for a Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC.) Ask about their experience and education in this area. Some IBCLCs will do long distance consults via Skype I believe. Try looking up IBCLCs close to you here: http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3432

    Some things to keep in mind: 1) breastfeeding management matters. Even if there is a preexisting condition that is harmful to milk production, getting breastfeeding off to the very best start possible will allow you to maximize your potential milk production. And this is done the same way in every circumstance. This starts with birth choices/experience-basically, the more traumatic or medicated the birth, the more difficult the immediate aftermath will be for both mom and baby. Then, it is important to make sure you have the support and time to be sure baby is nursing efficiently and very frequently in the hours, days and weeks just after baby is born. If baby cannot nurse efficiently enough, alternative methods of milk extraction are vital and also will need to be frequent enough to mimic early nursing.
    Milk production is not all or nothing. If your 6 month old is nursing 4 times a day and you are lactating, she is not exclusively formula fed. She is also getting your milk, and, just as importantly for her overall future health, she is nursing at the breast. Both are important and have proven benefits.
    There are many ways to achieve your goal of nursing your baby for a long time, even if it turns out you are unable to entirely feed baby with your own milk.

    We will be looking to have a second child in about 6 months time,
    Do you mean you are expecting a baby in 6 months, or that you plan to do IVF again in 6 months? If it is the former, congratulations! If it is the latter, I strongly agree with mommal. Leaving aside the issues that she covers, if you conceive in 6 months, your older child will be under two when baby is born. This can be an exceedingly difficult age, one-two year year olds not only need constant supervision but moms active participation in their activities. They are likely to ignore or not understand verbal instruction, so have to be held and/or chased, a lot., plus are either still in diapers entirely or are just learning to use the potty (an even harder time than diapers, imo.) So adding the demands of a newborn into the mix at this age is very difficult and exhausting under the best of circumstances- if you add in possible low production issues, where perhaps you will need to be pumping and supplementing baby as well as nursing, is asking an awful lot of yourself. If you look around this forum you will find threads from moms with '2 under 2' or even '2 under 3' and you will get a sense of how challenging this is. If you have a choice of when to conceive, you have the advantage of waiting until your eldest is a bit older, and this is an advantage in every way in most circumstances.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; May 16th, 2015 at 10:17 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Looking for a Specialist!

    Hi Maddieb,

    I have read "Making More Milk" already, and yes it was very good. I tried a lot of what they suggested, but now believe that no matter what I do it is my thyroid that is causing the low supply.

    Yes, Isobel gets the smallest amount of milk from me each time she has a nap, because she uses me as a soother. So she is getting at least 3-5 mouthfuls a day. Not much at all, but makes me hopeful that if my thyroid numbers come into line sooner rather than later that perhaps I will start to produce more milk...

    Regarding having a second child - I was going to go for IVF again in 6 months time and am not currently pregnant. Someone else has recommended that I wait until my thyroid numbers are 100% under control before I consider getting pregnant again, so this in itself may actually delay our having our second child. It's just frustrating because I'm 37 and getting on in age! We want 3 kids, so I was keen to have three children fairly close together and perhaps have a live-in au pair for the first 6 months of each birth... But I hear what you are saying, and will definitely take it on board. It will also give me a chance to go on a treatment course for my PCOS, and may even result in us being able to conceive naturally if that side of things is sorted out (and my thyroid is under control).

    Thank you for your help - I will look at that website to find someone near to me who has some experience in these things. I just feel that there is no one out there who knows the answers, and it's pretty frustrating.

    Thanks again,
    Leanne

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    24,794

    Default Re: Looking for a Specialist!

    I completely understand the difficulty of getting the number of kids you want when you're starting your family at a relatively older age. But 37 isn't that old!!! I think you can still give yourself at least 6 extra months to figure out if your thyroid is behaving normally before you think about undergoing the next round of IVF.

    I think the specialist you want to talk to is an endocrinologist, perhaps one with a sideline in reproductive endocrinology.

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