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Thread: OALD and oversupply

  1. #1

    Default OALD and oversupply

    Hello, I am a FTM. My baby is 10 weeks old.

    I know I have an overactive let down, as my baby pulls off during let down and I spray forcefully. He also chokes and coughs during feedings and makes a clicking sound. I always let the milk go into a washcloth and then let him reattach.

    My LO is pretty gassy and fussy between feedings. He does not have foamy green poop though. My question is: does OALD mean you also have an oversupply? Not sure if I should try block feeding.

    The symptoms I'm worried about are:
    -Constant short nursing sessions
    -Fussiness/gassiness
    -Inability to go longer than 2 hours of sleeping before wanting to eat

    Any advice/thoughts are appreciated.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: OALD and oversupply

    Hi, and welcome!

    Generally speaking, 10 weeks is a little old for continued OALD or overproduction to the point it is causing problems- are you pumping at all or doing anything else that might be increasing milk production? Do you ever feel engorged?

    My question is: does OALD mean you also have an oversupply?
    not always, so it is always a good idea to approach block nursing with caution. I will attach a very good article about block feeding that covers the do's and don'ts.

    Also, have you tried different nursing positions to help baby handle the flow? Laid back (baby on top) and sidelying often help.

    Another thing that helps, believe it or not, is frequent nursing sessions. Less time for milk to build up in the breast, less fast flow. Does baby typically nurse one side at a time? Something that seems to help in many cases is encouraging frequent nursing but one side at a time.

    The symptoms I'm worried about are:
    -Constant short nursing sessions
    -Fussiness/gassiness
    -Inability to go longer than 2 hours of sleeping before wanting to eat
    I think the description of how baby nurses does sound like baby has trouble handling your letdown. This may or may not mean the letdown is actually fast- sometimes, baby has trouble because baby is unable to get a good latch for some reason.

    But these symptoms you are concerned about are actually entirely normal in most cases and do not necessarily suggest anything is out of the ordinary. Also spraying milk at letdown is common and does not necessarily indicate unusually fast letdown.

    Block feeding http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/block-feeding

    Helping baby handle fast flow: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/...-breastfeeding

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    24,911

    Default Re: OALD and oversupply

    with MaddieB. I just want to reiterate that your baby's nursing style sounds very normal. 10 week-old babies are generally fussy and gassy creatures. Constant short nursing sessions and 2 hour intervals between nursing sessions are also completely normal. I known here are a lot of people who insist that babies "should" routinely go 3 or even more hours between nursing sessions, but this is a complete myth, based on the feeding patterns of intensively scheduled, formula-fed babies. For example, my mom recently told me about the difference between me, a breastfed baby, and my cousin "Bob", who was formula-fed. I nursed on demand around the clock, sometimes nursing several times inside an hour, sometimes taking a break of 2-3 hours. Bob, on the other hand, received large bottles of formula on a schedule, with bottles of water in between to keep him quiet in between scheduled feedings.

  4. #4

    Default Re: OALD and oversupply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*maddieb View Post
    Hi, and welcome!

    Generally speaking, 10 weeks is a little old for continued OALD or overproduction to the point it is causing problems- are you pumping at all or doing anything else that might be increasing milk production? Do you ever feel engorged?

    not always, so it is always a good idea to approach block nursing with caution. I will attach a very good article about block feeding that covers the do's and don'ts.

    Also, have you tried different nursing positions to help baby handle the flow? Laid back (baby on top) and sidelying often help.

    Another thing that helps, believe it or not, is frequent nursing sessions. Less time for milk to build up in the breast, less fast flow. Does baby typically nurse one side at a time? Something that seems to help in many cases is encouraging frequent nursing but one side at a time.



    I think the description of how baby nurses does sound like baby has trouble handling your letdown. This may or may not mean the letdown is actually fast- sometimes, baby has trouble because baby is unable to get a good latch for some reason.

    But these symptoms you are concerned about are actually entirely normal in most cases and do not necessarily suggest anything is out of the ordinary. Also spraying milk at letdown is common and does not necessarily indicate unusually fast letdown.

    Block feeding http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/block-feeding

    Helping baby handle fast flow: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/...-breastfeeding

    Thank you for replying & for the links.

    I was pumping about 2 weeks pp but stopped doing that a couple weeks ago because I was worried I was creating a problem and wanted to regulate my supply. I agree that 10 weeks seems a little long for these continued problems. I'm reaching out now for guidance because I thought it would be more regulated by now. I leak a ton, to the point that is soaks my shirt down to my waist. I never feel engorged like I did when my milk came in. I feel heavy if I haven't fed him in hours, but not painfully so.

    I do practice breastfeeding positions that help gravity control the flow and it helps a bit. But he still seems super fussy after feedings like he has a stomachache. He constantly has hiccups and is very burpy/gassy.

    He got his tongue tie clipped at 6 weeks. I thought that his clicking would subside, but it's still present and from what I understand it means he keeps unlatching? Does that indicate oversupply?

  5. #5

    Default Re: OALD and oversupply

    Thank you for the reply. I know babies are all different, but I was hoping my baby to have some sort of progress in the sleep department by now. I don't mind nursing him frequently during the day, but at some point I'd like more than 2 hours of uninterrupted sleep and am just worried it's something that I'm doing wrong that's making him wake up hungry so often!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,743

    Default Re: OALD and oversupply

    How is baby gaining? Usually a baby who's mom has overproduction gains quite fast. Babies wake and nurse frequently because their biology compels them to, not because they are hungry (as in, not getting enough to eat.) Babies nurse for both hunger and comfort, all at once, all tied together, there is really not much difference to a baby why he is nursing, he just knows he has got to nurse. This is healthy and normal. I strongly suggest the book Sweet Sleep for any sleep concerns. It should at least assure you that have done nothing wrong, and will give you idea to try to maximize your sleep. At 6 weeks, there is really not much to do to increase an infants sleep. A 6 week old sleeps how baby sleeps and that is, in short fragments.

    Sometimes there really is an issue. For example, allergies or reflux, causing baby to have discomfort that harms their ability to sleep. But the fact is sleeping in fragments is normal for quite a while.

    If baby has been gaining very fast, due to your continued concerns, block nursing may be appropriate. The Morhbacher article I linked should give you good guidance there. Since baby was treated for tongue tie, especially, you want to be very careful about reducing milk production. But you can take it one day (or part of a day) at a time. A day or two of block nursing is not likely to permanently mess up your production.

    My middle child also clicked. Click click click all day long. He did not have tongue tie, but I definitely had fast letdown and overproduction- I had it with all three of my babies but it affected him the most.

    I was also always a leaker, but for some weird reason, with my third baby, I leaked only on one side! Because I did not leak on the other side I became horribly engorged and got a terrible plug and ultimately had mastitis three times! That had never happened before. I really wished for leaking instead.

    Here is what I did for leaking. For nights: I bedshare with my babies. So I put a couple layers of towels under us both. Under the towels, I put a waterproof crib liner. When we woke up soaked, I could just peel of the top layer and go back to sleep. Helped if baby leaked too!
    For daytimes, I always carried an extra shirt for myself for outings. It went in diaper bag with baby's things.
    I double layered my nursing pads. Disposable went over the cotton one. It gave me a cleaner line and also saved the disposable for later use if it did not soak through. Also, some moms find wool pads more absorbent?
    When home, when I started to leak I grabbed a cloth diaper or baby blanket or whatever was handy and just stuffed it in there.
    For leaking on one side when nursing on the other, I tucked a cloth up my shirt or in my bra.
    I cannot remember how long I leaked regularly or a lot, but it was a while, 4 to 5 months at least. Long after I no longer had any symptoms of overproduction I still leaked. Like I said, I learned it was a mess but ultimately a blessing.

    Here are some things I did for burpy gassy babies:
    Held baby more or less upright (head above tummy, snuggled on my chest or dad's chest or more up on shoulder) more or less all the time, except when sleeping.
    For sleeping, I propped myself on pillows and leaned back with baby snuggled on my chest, baby's head above tummy.
    One of my babies liked to be burped a lot (during feeding, after feeding, etc) and this seemed to help him. The others, burping did not help.
    Nursed with baby's head above tummy. There are various ways to do this. Of course, laid back nursing facilitates this. But with one baby I had to sit almost straight up so baby could be almost straight up and down.
    Magic baby hold. I don't know a good online resource, it really helps to see a picture. There is one in Sweet Sleep.
    hth

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