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Thread: Tiring on latching

  1. #1
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    Nov 2014
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    Default Tiring on latching

    I'm so tired to breastfeed my newborn. I hope there's someone there to help me. So this is what I face. I breastfeed my baby at 1am and he actually fall asleep when he latch for about 10min. I tried to wake him up by changing his diaper and burping him but he never seem to be awake. So I put him to sleep. Then he woke up again at 2am. So I latch him again. He latch for about 5 min and pull off from me. So I try to burp him and let him seat upright for about 15min. Try to push him to my breast but he doesn't seem to want. Awhile later he spit out some milk. After that I change his diaper again and latch him for about 5 min again. He pull off again. So I try burping him again. I put him down and let him lie down. He spit up milk again and seem hungry again. So I latch him again. So I have been repeating this again and again. The frustration is he keep wanting and I keep giving but he keep spit up milk after each feed. Only manage to make him sleep at 4am. Anyone face the same problem? Any solution to this.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    Hi and welcome! I am sure you will find helpful ideas here. Frequent nursing - even sometimes every hour for at least part of the day-happening day and/or night is quite common in a newborn and in fact is usually normal and not typically a problem. It depends on if baby is gaining well and if nursing is comfortable for mom.

    Spit up, even frequent, is also typically normal and not a problem.

    But I think it would help if we had some clarification.

    How old is your baby?
    Is nursing comfortable for you? If not, what are you feeling?
    Are you feeling full between feedings? Ever uncomfortably so? Not at all?
    Does baby gasp or choke or otherwise seem to have trouble with the milk flow while nursing?
    Are you describing one night, most nights, or every night?
    Does baby nurse like this during the day as well?
    What is the weight check history from birth to now?
    How many times each day does baby typically poop, what does it generally look like, and about how much each time?
    Does baby ever nurse for longer than just a few minutes?
    Over the last 24 hours, how many times total did baby nurse? Was the last 24 hours typical or not?

    That should be enough to get us started. Thanks!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*maddieb View Post
    Hi and welcome! I am sure you will find helpful ideas here. Frequent nursing - even sometimes every hour for at least part of the day-happening day and/or night is quite common in a newborn and in fact is usually normal and not typically a problem. It depends on if baby is gaining well and if nursing is comfortable for mom.

    Spit up, even frequent, is also typically normal and not a problem.

    But I think it would help if we had some clarification.

    How old is your baby?
    Is nursing comfortable for you? If not, what are you feeling?
    Are you feeling full between feedings? Ever uncomfortably so? Not at all?
    Does baby gasp or choke or otherwise seem to have trouble with the milk flow while nursing?
    Are you describing one night, most nights, or every night?
    Does baby nurse like this during the day as well?
    What is the weight check history from birth to now?
    How many times each day does baby typically poop, what does it generally look like, and about how much each time?
    Does baby ever nurse for longer than just a few minutes?
    Over the last 24 hours, how many times total did baby nurse? Was the last 24 hours typical or not?

    That should be enough to get us started. Thanks!
    My baby is 1 month 18days old.
    I don't face any nipple crack or pain during latching but I think that my position is wrong as my baby can't seem to settle down to finish. He keep fidget around and sometime pull off then opening his mouth wide again when I place it near my breast.
    Because my baby only latch for 5-10 min during each feed. So I always feel full for both my breast. I don't ever feel he did help me to empty my breast. I'm tired of pumping and leaking. Sometime when I'm feeding him with one breast, my another breast start to drip and that's frustrating.
    My baby does choke a few time during feeding.
    This happen for two days already.
    Everything is fine during the day. It only happen at night.
    My baby weight 3.4kg when birth. He is 5.6kg now. Pedestrian say he's overweight and mention I overfeed him.
    He can poop almost after every feed. He have green poo for almost 2days. Sometime he poo really a lot. Almost the whole pamper and sometime only like a little.
    He did nurse for more than 10min that's when I finish pumping and latch him. But it's tiring to do that every night.
    During day I can nurse every 2-3 hours but night time is like I'm nursing him almost every hour.
    Am I having too much supply of milk? How do I tell if I'm having too much milk?
    I really wish to nurse him as it will be much more easier at night. It also hurt me to see him keep spit up. It's like he never feel full.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    Ok, I think what you have here is a case of overproduction and fast letdown.
    This is a common, not at all serious (as far as baby's overall health is concerned) and fixable breastfeeding issue. In fact in many cases it is not even an issue, but I can see it is making both you and baby a bit uncomfortable so I will give you some suggestions to see if they help. But first I really want to reassure you about a couple things:
    Weight gain:
    I unfortunately cannot think in metric at all. So check my numbers. But this is what I came up with. I converted your numbers and see that baby has gained about 4 and 1/2 to 5 pounds (?) since baby was born 6-7 weeks ago. For explaining this next bit I am rounding the numbers to say that one half pound is approximately 1/4 kg.

    So, Gain of 1/4 kg per week (about 8 or 9 ounces) would be normal average gain in the newborn period. But many babies gain much faster and many a bit slower and it is entirely healthy and fine.
    Your baby is about 7 weeks old and has gained about 2 and 1/4 Kg since birth. So that averages out to about 1/3 Kg (or, about 11-12 ounces) per week. Yes, this is fast gain. But it is NOT an indication your baby is overweight nor gaining too rapidly. That is just total nonsense. Many babies gain very rapidly early on and then slow down and it all evens out.

    Spit up: is NORMAL. Almost all babies spit up frequently no matter how or what they are fed. The spitting up will calm down as your milk production calms down, but meanwhile, it is NOT hurting your baby to spit up.
    Nursing very frequently day and night is NORMAL in the newborn period. I know it is tiring, but I strongly suggest, resist the idea that how often your baby nurses indicates something is wrong. Because the frequent feeding is actually helping the situation of fast letdown.
    Lots of poop is 100% normal. Green poop is usually also 100% normal. I think the fast letdown is partly to 'blame' so again, this will calm down as that calms down. But there is nothing abnormal or unhealthy about this poop pattern.
    Baby not full: Your baby is gaining very well. Trust me, he is getting plenty full. He is likely nursing so often for comfort because he is a bit uncomfortable. This is NORMAL and fine. Again, baby may nurse less, but for longer, after milk production calms down. But meanwhile, it is fine and in fact helping to let baby nurse a lot.
    Leaking: Messy but 100% normal. This also will calm down in a few weeks when your milk production calms down.

    Here is what I suggest:

    First, If possible, see a lactation consultant, an International Board Certified LC if at all possible. Not only will she be able to reassure you, she can make sure there are no other issues that are perhaps being hidden by the overproduction.

    Second: STOP pumping, except as needed if you are uncomfortably full. Pumping along with the nursing is increasing your milk production and you do not want that. When you pump due to feeling too full, pump just enough to feel somewhat softened. You can try hand expressing as well instead, but whichever you do, do it just to relieve the pressure so you are not too full or uncomfortable.

    Don't worry about 'emptying' the breast. You do not want to feel overfull, hard, or tight at all, but you do not need your breasts 'emptied' by baby or the pump either.

    For fast letdown: 1) Nurse as often as baby will, one side at a time. 2) nurse in a reclined position (laid back- see info I will link below) 3) If baby is sputtering,choking, take baby off an let the milk go into a towel or cloth, and put baby back on after the flow lessens. Some moms find they need to hand express or pump a little milk 'off the top' prior to latching baby, but be careful about pumping too much or too often and increasing your milk production.

    For overproduction: Read the following articles about block nursing. Think carefully about it before doing it. It WILL reduce your milk production, so you want to be very sure that is what you want. I think you and your baby fit the criteria, but it is very important to be sure.
    IF you decide to block nurse, remember 1) to continue to nurse as often as baby will- just have baby nurse on one side for two or more feedings. and 2) if you start feeling full on the blocked side, that is good- it is the full feeling that tells your body to make less milk. BUT, you want to be very careful to avoid getting engorged- super full, hard, tight, etc. If that is happening on the side you are blocking, either switch sides or hand express or pump that side just enough to relieve the pressure.

    I had overproduction and fast letdown with 3 babies. They all gained rapidly early on, spit up a lot, pooped a lot-everything your baby is doing. They were then and are now very healthy, very strong, and have no weight issues whatsoever. Hang in there, because this is an issue that really does get better.

    fast flow: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/

    other ideas for fast flow: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...ggrimacing.pdf

    block nursing: http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/block-feeding

    more info about block feeding: http://cwgenna.com/blockfeeding.html

  5. #5
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    Nov 2014
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    I have pump milk out as I'm always feeling full. So I will store the milk in the fridge. Some of my milk have thick layer on top but some only have some. Is the thick layer fats that make my baby feel full after drinking?

  6. #6
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    Apr 2014
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    If you pump you tell your body to make more, so then it will make more, and then you will feel even fuller :s

    Conversely if you don't remove the milk you will end up in pain....

    Therefore only pump to comfort, don't try to empty the breast, maybe pump an ounce and then stop. Alternatively if you are feeling full, offer to nurse your baby and see if they can save you a job.

    All of your milk fills the baby up, not just the fat! Fat content varies throughout the day and is nothing to worry about

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    You could also try hand expressing instead of the pump as some mums find that is less stimulating.

  8. #8
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    Mar 2014
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    Yes, try to minimize pumping as much as you can! If baby will latch on, let baby nurse instead of pumping. If you can just hand express a little for comfort that may be all you need to do. You don't need to try to make baby nurse longer than he wants at each session, your baby is gaining well. With high production and active letdown babies can be done nursing quickly.

    The night time spit up issue, it might help to keep baby semi upright for a time after feeding so that baby doesn't immediately spit up when being layed down and then fuss. If the spit up is making baby excessively uncomfortable (and wanting to nurse for comfort because of it) you might want to discuss reflux or GERD with your Pediatrician but since baby isn't having a big problem with this during the day, you might be able to take care of it just by letting the fast flow of your let down into a towel and keeping baby a bit more upright for a while after feeding at night. (Some moms find they have to let baby sleep on their chest as they recline.)

    Leaking is simply your bodies way of trying to relieve the pressure without causing excess production, breastpads or a face towel can catch the leaks (if you are going to be returning to work anytime and need to store milk, then perhaps order a MyMilkies to catch the dripping from the breast that isn't being nursed on, that way you can collect and store milk without having to pump and make your over production worse.)

    To help baby deal with fast flow, If you spray milk during let down, definitely unlatch baby and let that spray go into a towel then re latch once spray is done. This will probably let baby nurse a little longer without choking and may also reduce spit up.

    This should all calm down over the next several weeks. The newborn phase is always hard even when things are perfect.

    To get more sleep, I recommend the sweet sleep book or you can look up the link to the tear sheets here.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Tiring on latching

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*peijie View Post
    I have pump milk out as I'm always feeling full. So I will store the milk in the fridge. Some of my milk have thick layer on top but some only have some. Is the thick layer fats that make my baby feel full after drinking?
    I don't know how to put this more plainly. You are worried about the wrong thing. Nothing in your babies behavior indicates that your baby does not feel full! Your baby is gaining very well so clearly baby is getting plenty of milk. The problem is not that your baby is not feeling full. The problem is that you make so much milk and it is coming out of the breast so quickly when baby nurses. These are the issues that are causing discomfort for both you and your baby. When you solve those issues, it is very likely baby will be more settled at night.

    How many times each day have you been pumping? If you have been pumping frequently, it is very possible you will now have to gradually wean off the pumping to prevent getting engorged. But it is very important that you somehow find a way to stop pumping.
    Pumping is not helping your situation it is making it worse.

    And how your expressed milk looks in the refrigerator means absolutely nothing. Your baby is getting plenty of milk and plenty of fatty milk.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; November 8th, 2014 at 11:47 AM.

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