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Thread: Gas and spit up. Normal?.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    South Carolina
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    Default Gas and spit up. Normal?.

    A little back story first: due to some "issues" in the hospital, our breastfeeding relationship didn't get off to a fabulist start. I had to have a c-section due to LO being breech and other methods of turning not being an option bc of placental issues. I wanted to nurse ASAP after delivery. It was difficult to say the least but instead of being worked with, I was given a nipple shield. Then, the staff told us that my son was loosing too much weight and I was given a pump and told I needed to feed him expressed breast milk after each feeding via a bottle.Long story short, we no longer are doing the expressed milk as of 3 weeks ago so that appears to be a non issue but I can't help but wonder if the nipple shield is causing some of the issues that I describe below. We are in the process of weaning off of it but it is a slow process.

    My little man is a month old today and as of about a week ago he started spitting up after each feeding when I burp him or jostle him at all. He doesn't cry or fuss when he's spitting up and it doesn't appear to be projectile but I can't help but wonder if he isn't spitting up everything he just ate! I'm not sure if it's related or not, but since he was born, about 15 minutes before "time" to eat again(he's not on a schedule, I nurse on demand, but he tends to eat every 2.5hrs) he fusses and has terrible gas usually accompanied by a BM. typically I have to help him pass gas by bicycling his legs etc in order for him to get comfortable enough to latch. If I don't, he fights the breast and won't latch for sometimes 10mins.
    Thanks so much for your help and advice in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,754

    Default Re: Gas and spit up. Normal?.

    lots of Spit up and lots of poops and gas entirely normal at this age. I would suggest offering to nurse more frequently, as sucking itself triggers the poop reflex in many cases, and increasing nursing frequency is often helpful in slowing down letdown and thus leads to less spit up and more overall comfort for baby. It is also very helpful with breast fighting. But all you can do is offer, and also, hold baby most of the time in between nursing sessions, with 'easy access' or even skin to skin so baby gets the idea to nurse and CAN nurse with no 'waiting," . Nipple shields can interfere with 'spontaneous" nursing, and so that is possibly part of what is going on.

    Are you sure baby is capable of latching and nursing without the shield? Have you gotten help with helping baby latch without it?

    As far as if the nipple shield causing any issues, it is possible that baby is getting air when baby nurses maybe? This might be caused by a shield and it can be caused if there is a fast letdown and baby is gulping. In neither case is it anything to worry about.

    The most damaging issue with shield use is the potential that it might cause baby to not get enough milk or for milk production to be harmed over time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    602

    Default Re: Gas and spit up. Normal?.

    Sometimes a mother's milk supply can get to be too much during the first few months of nursing, which can lead to lots of spit ups. Milk supply can get be up and down during these first few months as your body is figuring out exactly what it needs to do, as far as feeding one baby or multiple. If baby is a happy spitter then don't worry about it, it will likely pass in a couple of months. And no, he is not spitting up everything he just ate, it only looks like a lot because it is covering his clothes (and your clothes, and the rocking chair, and the carpet ) As for the gas, an overabundant milk supply can lead to baby gas, too. Then again, some babies are gassy no matter what you do. When I found myself in a milk over supply situation with my first baby, he was very spitty and gassy, but once my supply righted itself the spitting lessened but the gas was a constant. We tried gas drops, probiotics, baby massage, even chiropractics, but he was just a gassy baby.

    Maddieb give some good advice for avoiding the baby that is too upset to nurse.
    My little man was born 12/17/2010.

    Baby girl was born 4/30/2014.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Gas and spit up. Normal?.

    Maddieb we have had some success without the shield. Typically, I let him nurse with the shield on first then remove it at some point during the feeding. He's able to latch on very successfully that way. I usually do this for the majority of daytime nursing but don't bother with it so much at night right now. I was meeting with an LC at my home when he was having weight issues but once he reached his birth weight I stopped.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    South Carolina
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    Default Re: Gas and spit up. Normal?.

    So true about the spit up being EVERYWHERE! When I met with an LC a few weeks ago, his poops were green and we still had the gas issue. She felt like I was having a foremilk hindmilk imbalance. His poops have since returned to yellow and seedy so I assumed my supply had regulated but the gas remains. So maybe I do just have a gassy baby!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    10,754

    Default Re: Gas and spit up. Normal?.

    Assuming weight gain continues to be normal, It truly sounds like you & baby are doing fine!

    The longer I am around breastfeeding the more I think there are basically 2 breastfeeding issues that require intervention. 1, baby is not gaining enough, or 2, nursing hurts. Those are the biggies, and a very distant 3rd as far as frequency of occurrence is true hyperlactation where moms milk is so abundant it is causing serious problems. Spit up and gas are not even on my list as both are in almost all circumstances normal. And that, along with everything else including the typical early on abundant production usually works itself out as long as mom and baby remain in tune with cue feeding and mom offering frequent nursing sessions. So Please do not worry about foremilk/hindmilk 'imbalance' it is in almost every case such a non-issue. If you had a touch of overproduction, all the better as it is less likely the shield use would cause serious harm to your milk production.

    Shields can take time to wean off, and progress may come in fits and starts, but do keep working at it. I think you will find breastfeeding much simpler and relaxing when those are out of the picture.

    Keep a handy pile of cloth diapers or similar type towels in various spots in the house and in diaper bag, stroller, car etc, for mop up.

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