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Thread: reflux

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Default reflux

    Is anyone dealing with reflux in their baby? My LO is about 4 weeks old and recently started screaming her head off 24/7. The ped thought it was a reaction to my antibiotic (dicloxicillian) I'm taking for a breast infection or reflux. She instructed me to do formula for 24 hours while pumping and dumping. LO did better initially but by 10AM today she was back to screaming. So I have a prescription for zantac and she received 1 dose and is finally sleeping. I am finishing my antibiotic tomorrow and will be returning to BF asap. I'm interested if anyone else is dealing with this issue or if anyone has any experience with zantac and their baby.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    627

    Default Re: reflux

    I got Dd's prescription for zantac filled today, so she just got her first dose. We'll see if it helps. She is a slllllloooooowwwww eater and was losing weight. She also coughs, hiccups, and spits up, more after formula than breastfeeding. I'm hoping it helps her belly to tolerate food better so she starts to be a more active nurser.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    236

    Default Re: reflux

    So sorry to hear you are dealing with reflux. The constant screaming can be emotionally and physically exhuasting. My DS screamed much of his first weeks. He started Zantac several weeks ago. I just filled his second prescription today. It took several days to see an effect but after that he was a different baby. We have been so happy to see him pain free. I know that Zantac does not work for everyone but for my DS it has been amazing. Let me know if I can answer any questions. I will be thinking of you. I hope your LO is feeling better soon.
    Last edited by BrooklynMama; November 30th, 2006 at 07:08 PM. Reason: Spelling

    Mama to DD Mariah 04/03 2lbs 8oz BF 2yrs 1 day!
    DS Ryan 07/06 4lbs 15 oz No solids until 18 mo's!
    "You must be the change you wish to see in the world" Gandhi

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    14

    Default Re: reflux

    We started my LO on zantac at 4 weeks (she is 8 weeks now). And we have seen a totally different baby too!! We still have some issues giving it to her because she likes to scream which makes it tough, but from day to day she has done a 180. Hope it works for you.

  5. #5

    Default Re: reflux

    Zantac is what my son takes - we started him on that when he was five or six weeks old. Made a huge difference, he was so much happier and slept a lot better.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    780

    Default Re: reflux

    DS takes 7.5mg of Prevacid, daily and it is night and day difference .... Good luck with your LO -- I hope you get back on track soon!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    14

    Default Re: reflux

    Wondering if any of your LO's have trouble putting the medicine down? My little girl sometimes looks like she's choking on the zantac. It doesn't look very good and I almost want to stop giving it to her because its not worth her choking. Hmm...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    1,492

    Default Re: reflux

    Here's what I posted in the other reflux/zantac threads. There seems to be a big new crop of reflux-y babies poor little things

    I don't know who the genius is that thought MINT would be a good flavor for the prescription infant zantac, but he's so totally fired.

    Some mamas have suggested taking your 'scrip to a compounding pharmacy where they can customize the flavor completely. One of the women who did this will be able to chime in with info on that, I'm sure.

    At first, we had our pharmacist just add grape flavoring to the prescription (if they have colorless grape, that's better for your laundry) but after a little while, I asked if I could just add apple juice to each dose and the pharm. said that was cool. Costs a lot less I'd pull DD's dose of Zantac into the syringe and then pull about 1 ml of apple juice in. Took a little longer to give it to her, but more actually made it down the hatch.

    We noticed about a lag time of 4 to 5 days when we got DD onto the meds and when we actually noticed a difference. There's also a possibility that the dosage is too small; our ped started with the lowest dosage and adjusted up to DD's needs. Every month or so, we'd have to up the dosage with her growth.

    If the Zantac isn't working for your LO, there are other meds, like Prevacid (mentioned by babygirlsmom1005 above) that can block acid production more completely.

    In my experience, using the motility agent Reglan was NOT a good idea. I just want to caution mamas to keep a good eye on your LO if you decide to use a motility agent. They can have some very serious and freaky side effects. Even though some of the side effects had only appeared in older adults, we witnessed them in DD and it was not good. Very scary stuff.

    HTH!

    Let us know what happens!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    893

    Default Re: reflux

    My LO had severe reflux that required a surgical fix due to it was causing lung problems also (aspiration). She was on Zantac for such a short time in the NICU before they switched her to Prevacid, so I don't know much about Zantac. A lot of useful information is at http://marci-kids.com/ to help you understand reflux and the meds.

    Here are some things that will help with reflux that you can do at home on top of the medicine:

    Hold infants upright
    Keep infants upright during feedings, and for at least 30 minutes after feedings. This will decrease the amount of gastric reflux. Upright means no bend in their tummy area - avoid car seats and swings during this time if possiable.

    Laying infant down while awake
    If you lay the infant down after feeding, place the baby on his/her stomach (prone position) on an incline of at least 30 degrees.This can reduce regurgitation. But only place the infant in this position if he/she is awake. Laying on the stomach is not recommended during sleep for infants from birth to 12 months because of the link between this position and sudden infant death syndrome. Based on guidelines set forth by the AmericanAcademy of Pediatrics, positioning the infant on his/her back (supine position) during sleep is generally recommended. In infants with GERD, the risk of SIDS generally outweighs the potential benefits of prone sleeping. Prone positioning during sleep is only considered in unusual cases where the risk of death from complications of GER outweighs the potential increased risk of SIDS. It is very important to discuss this with the infant's doctor before undertaking any changes in sleeping positions.

    Nighttime
    As noted above, position the infant on his/her back, and elevate the head of the bed 30-45 degrees. Gravity will help keep stomach contents where they belong.

    Smaller, more frequent feedings
    Feedings every two to three hours when the infant is awake will reduce the occurrence of gastric reflux. Overfeeding can increase abdominal pressure, which can lead to gastric reflux. Example for breastfeeding: If your LO nurses every 3 hours, nurse your LO on one side, wait a 1 1/2 and then nurse on the other side, repeat.

    Diet modifications for mothers who breast-feed
    Certain foods, such as caffeine, chocolate, and garlic, can promote reflux, so if you breast-feed your infant, you should consider cutting these foods out of your diet.

    Burping the infant.
    Burping the infant several times during the feeding will help minimize gastric pressure, and the reflux it can cause. Waiting to burp the infant after he/she has a full stomach can increase the chances of regurgitation.

    Loose clothing.
    Avoid tight elastic around the waist, and keep diapers loose.

    Avoid certain beverages
    Don't give your infant caffeinated beverages, orange juice or other citrus juices.

    Positioning in infant seats and car seats
    The way the infant is positioned in the car seat can cause regurgitation to increase. If the infant slouches over, it causes abdominal compression, increasing the risk of reflux. Using simple supports to keep the infant upright will prevent this.

    I hope some of this helps and I am sorry your having to go through this.
    Last edited by babygirlsmom1005; December 5th, 2006 at 09:39 PM.

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