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Thread: Foremilk/Hindmilk Imbalance Help.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,749

    Default Re: Foremilk/Hindmilk Imbalance Help.

    I am curious where the information that suspected foremilk-hindmilk so-called "imbalance" should be treated with block nursing is coming from.

    As explained above, this is not the current recommendation unless baby is gaining faster than average (in some recommendations, MUCH faster than average) and it is clear that overproduction (not just fast letdown or something else) is the root of the issues. Block nursing was in vogue for some time, and in some cases is certainly appropriate. but recently several breastfeeding experts have raised the alarm that this intervention is causing serious issues when used when not needed or not done carefully.

    When considering a breastfeeding intervention, imo, it is important to try benign methods first before trying anything that may cause harm. Block nursing certainly may cause harm. And The longer block nursing is done, the more possible harm it might do. So when tried, it can be tried very briefly-even a day or two may make the needed adjustment in production for nursing to be comfortable for mom and baby.

    For issues related to overproduction and forceful letdown, some benign interventions that often work but do no harm would be to encourage baby to nurse more often, nurse one side at a time, use a reclined position when nursing, and hand expressing a little milk prior to baby nursing, and to stop any 'extra' pumping (pumping due to separations may of course still be needed.) It is also important to be sure baby is able to latch and nurse well. A poor latch could explain some symptoms blamed on overproduction, and also, if production is lowered and baby is unable to latch and suckle with normal effectiveness, block nursing may create a situation where baby is no longer able to get enough milk.

    Also, milk production usually 'normalizes' over time anyway. So sometimes, it is just a matter of waiting a few weeks while taking any or all of the above measures as needed.

    These two articles talk about block nursing, when it might be appropriate, and when not, and how to do it. http://cwgenna.com/blockfeeding.html and http://www.nancymohrbacher.com/blog/tag/block-feeding

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Foremilk/Hindmilk Imbalance Help.

    thanks for this post

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Foremilk/Hindmilk Imbalance Help.

    Now I am more confused than before lol. My little guy usually only nurses on one side at a time anyways, and my breast does usually feel soft after he is done, but how so you know he is emptying the breast? Also if he sleeps for 2 1/2 - 3hrs my breast do feel hard, and today both of my under arms are sore. Could this be mastitis?
    And when should I pump? I have been trying to get a little supply for some night feedings. My nipples could use a break and daddy wants to help?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    1,428

    Default Re: Foremilk/Hindmilk Imbalance Help.

    feeding expressed breast milk via bottle doesn't really give mom a break since whenever bottles are given mom needs to pump to make sure her supply doesn't drop because of it.

    Most moms with a normal supply and established breastfeeding will pump perhaps once a day after the first morning feeding to start building a stash. Of course if you have an over supply, you want to avoid extra pumping/stimulation but if you have an extreme over supply you could probably pump a couple feedings worth in one session and realize you shouldn't pump anymore extra. (normally when pumping after feeding most moms with a normal supply may only get an oz or so.)

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,749

    Default Re: Foremilk/Hindmilk Imbalance Help.

    Adwilson, I would suggest trying to encourage baby to nurse a little more often. It is perfectly normal for a baby to only want one side at the time, and you don't really need to worry about if the baby is "emptying" the breast. But nursing more often may help with the feeling of over fullness you are experiencing between nursing sessions.
    Is nursing comfortable and this baby's latch appear effective? That would be another thing to consider -whether baby is able to extract milk effectively. Sometimes engorgement is caused because baby cannot.

    Feeling pain or heavyness even far up in the breast tissue, does not necessarily indicate mastitis. Mastitis is used to refer to an infection, and typically if a mother has mastitis she is actually feeling ill. For example has a fever and feels achy. However if your breasts are commonly feeling overly full and in pain that is a definite sign of engorgement and engorgement could certainly lead to mastitis.

    If you are unable to encourage baby to nurse frequently enough to prevent engorgement, then that might be a time you actually should pump or hand express just enough to relieve that pressure.
    I agree with previous post. If you are feeling over full between feedings, the last thing you want to do is have one of those feedings replaced with a bottle. This will only lead to more in engorgement and and possible issues. So even if you pump I would suggest save that milk for another time.
    Rather then having others feed baby, I suggest, have others take care of you so that you need not do too much during the intensive early days of breast-feeding.
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; July 24th, 2014 at 06:09 PM.

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