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Thread: State regulations not up to par :(

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    12

    Default State regulations not up to par :(

    I'm curious... what would you do?

    I did all this research about how to best store/handle my breast milk to send to day care, only to find out that state regulations don't support my plans at all.

    1) Fresh breast milk is supposed to be okay in the fridge for 3-5 days; in Indiana, licensed day care providers must use it within 48 hours. My options are to bring home any unopened bottles and freeze the milk, or lie to the day care provider about when it was expressed.

    2) Even though research shows that an unfinished bottle can be refrigerated and safely given at the next feeding, state regulations for day care providers say unfinished amounts must be discarded. My plan was to send 3 oz. bottles, but now I'm going to have to send no more than 2 oz. servings, which means sending like 7 bottles (5 - 2 oz. and 2 - 1 oz. "top off" bottles).

    What would you - or DO you - do?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    624

    Default Re: State regulations not up to par :(

    I would absolutely send the smaller bottles! I personally always left 2 oz bottles for my daughter, even though I have in-home care that is not bound by state laws for milk handling. You'll want to do whatever you can to minimize waste in this situation, and I think that is your best bet. I would also hesitate to bring any "extra" fresh milk in over and above what you think your child will drink to minimize the likelihood that your daycare will overfeed baby. If they want extra for "emergencies," will they allow you to bring some frozen milk that they can thaw in those circumstances?

    It is so frustrating and hard that the state regulations are not in line with what we know to be safe for breastmilk handling.
    Apologies for the short responses! I'm usually responding one-handed on my smartphone!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,912

    Default Re: State regulations not up to par :(

    I agree with pp. Send what you estimate is just enough for each day in the small bottles. It is not as if your child will starve if you are a couple of ounces short as baby (presumably) can nurse as soon as baby is with you. If you find baby is going through all the milk you send and needs more, up what you send by a small amount, but first, make sure baby is being fed correctly via paced bottle feeding and not being overfed.

    yes and what about sending frozen milk? What are the regulations about that? Milk frozen in small amounts only takes a few moments to defrost under running water or in a bowl of water. If you don't have milk frozen in small amounts, that won't work right now, but you could start doing that for the future.

    I am confused about why you would have to lie about how "old" your milk is. The day care can only be expected to have control over how long THEY keep your milk. I cannot believe the regulations say that they have to grill moms about when the milk was expressed or defrosted. Do they?

    I would also suggest, contact the entity that sets these regulations and suggest that they be changed to reflect the facts. Future working and nursing moms in your state will thank you!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,358

    Default Re: State regulations not up to par :(

    1) Fresh breast milk is supposed to be okay in the fridge for 3-5 days; in Indiana, licensed day care providers must use it within 48 hours. My options are to bring home any unopened bottles and freeze the milk, or lie to the day care provider about when it was expressed.
    I would send just enough fresh milk to cover the baby's intake that day, and send some additional frozen milk in case the fresh isn't enough. I think you can expect an adjustment period in the first few weeks as you figure out what your baby generally takes at daycare. If that means you're arriving at daycare to find a whole bottle untouched, I think you should take it "for the ride home" and feel free to send it the next day. I doubt anyone will ask you if it's the same bottle you took home last night.

    2) Even though research shows that an unfinished bottle can be refrigerated and safely given at the next feeding, state regulations for day care providers say unfinished amounts must be discarded. My plan was to send 3 oz. bottles, but now I'm going to have to send no more than 2 oz. servings, which means sending like 7 bottles (5 - 2 oz. and 2 - 1 oz. "top off" bottles).
    I'd contact the state regulators- you'd be surprised how much impact a single letter can make! Government regulators generally get very, very little input from the public. You could even get your local La Leche League involved- maybe the ladies there would want to send letters, as well.

    I definitely would send the 2 oz bottles, and call that an unlocked-for benefit of the dumb regulation. Small bottles mean less chance that the daycare will overfeed your baby, because they will be forced to pause the feeding to reach for another bottle- and that gives your baby a chance to decide whether or not he's still hungry. A couple extra bottles to wash is a small price to pay for a more appropriate feeding style.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: State regulations not up to par :(

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    I am confused about why you would have to lie about how "old" your milk is. The day care can only be expected to have control over how long THEY keep your milk. I cannot believe the regulations say that they have to grill moms about when the milk was expressed or defrosted. Do they?

    I would also suggest, contact the entity that sets these regulations and suggest that they be changed to reflect the facts. Future working and nursing moms in your state will thank you!
    Only quoting one poster, but you all pretty much said the same things I'm going to bring this up to the LLLI group local to me at the next meeting... and when I went back to pick up my little this afternoon, I talked to the day care provider again, and she agrees with my way of doing things and thinks the state is behind. She said that happens all the time ::feigned shock::

    I'm going to send a little less than I was planning, closer to the "1 oz. per hour apart" than the "1.5 oz. per hour apart". I think that'll be okay, and if it's not I can try to send a little more. Tomorrow is my first day back to work and I have a teensy freezer stash, so I'm anxious to see how much I am able to pump while at work. The regulations don't actually mention frozen breast milk specifically; they just state that it must be transported and stored at 41F or below. And as for the lying about how old it is? I'm required to sign a form that states I'll meet the state regulations, which are that fresh, expressed milk must be used within 48 hours and that uneaten portions will be discarded. I don't know how they would ever know... even if she kept some kind of log about the number of bottles and their contents, there's no way for them to know whether it was expressed the day before, same day, or thawed from a 6 month old stash! She is sending home any unused bottles still refrigerated, so I'll simply relabel (everything has to be labeled) and send it back.

    This is the kind of thing that is going to drive me nuts about day care. My provider seems really great; she's a licensed in-home provider, she only has kids under school age, she only has 6 total (including my daughter), and she only has 2 infants. She's been doing this for 35 years, but I'm reminded that experience does not make someone an expert :/

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