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Thread: When to use Pacifiers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Lake Dallas, TX
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    Question When to use Pacifiers

    Hello everyone! I'm new here! I am so excited to be in touch with super amazing and supportive women! I love every thread I have read through so far, this is what being a woman and mother is about!

    Ok, now to the point. My son is 2 months old! We have a really well established and awesome breastfeeding relationship (though it wasn't without its challenges - he had a tongue tie...ouch!) He gains weight very well, my production is on par (might even have a slight over supply because I pump at work) and always wets well over 6 diapers. That being said we have introduced the pacifier recently as my husband is a stay at home dad and it really helps him get through bouts of fussiness. He only does it after Seb has had a bottle and is sure he is full, he rarely ever takes a full bottle because he is definitely reverse cycling (which doesn't bother me at all!) Is this the proper use of a paci for a breastfed baby? We use Tommie Tippee bottles and we are giving him Soothies as a pacifier.
    Mama to Sebastian Born 2/13/14

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,501

    Default Re: When to use Pacifiers

    As long as it doesn't seem to be affecting his ability or willingness to nurse when you're with him, there shouldn't be anything wrong with your DH using a paci to soothe him while you're at work; it certainly is preferable to DH having to listen to the lo cry in between feedings when he needs soothing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,334

    Default Re: When to use Pacifiers

    So you mean when you are not there? Yes that should be fine. Pacifiers are basically breast substitutes, so it makes sense to use them when the breast is not available!

    The potential issue with pacifiers is three fold. IN no particular order, here are the possible concerns. One, a pacifier might create 'bad habits' that lead to a poor latch or clamping/biting when baby nurses. If that starts happening, your husband might need to try other comforting techniques, and you might also need to look at how baby is bottle fed (more on that below) Two, and this is the one I think is really serious, is that overuse of pacifiers can create a situation where baby is given a pacifier over and over instead of nursed. In the most severe cases, this can cause slow weight gain and poor milk production. Third, there is the concern about 'triple nipple syndrome' where a baby is both bottle and breastfed AND given a pacifier frequently for comfort. It is believed that over time, this creates a situation where baby stops identifying the breast as THE place for sustenance AND comfort, and starts to lose interest in nursing before a normal weaning time. To counteract that one, it might make sense to encourage as much nursing as you can, both for comforting and feeding, when you are with baby.

    Is your husband cue feeding baby and using paced bottle feeding techniques? These are also important in avoiding breastfeeding issues when baby is getting regular bottles. Bottle feeding Breastfed baby: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000...astfedbaby.pdf and soothing fussy baby: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000...ybabyideas.pdf

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    2,209

    Default Re: When to use Pacifiers

    I work as well and my nanny started using the pacifier with my LO when she was a couple months old. Now she is two and she still loves nursing! I think as long as you are attentive to the issues that LLLMeg brings up, and make sure to encourage nursing when you are together with LO (which it sounds like you are doing, if baby is reverse cycling), using the pacifier in the way you are is fine.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Lake Dallas, TX
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: When to use Pacifiers

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    So you mean when you are not there? Yes that should be fine. Pacifiers are basically breast substitutes, so it makes sense to use them when the breast is not available!

    The potential issue with pacifiers is three fold. IN no particular order, here are the possible concerns. One, a pacifier might create 'bad habits' that lead to a poor latch or clamping/biting when baby nurses. If that starts happening, your husband might need to try other comforting techniques, and you might also need to look at how baby is bottle fed (more on that below) Two, and this is the one I think is really serious, is that overuse of pacifiers can create a situation where baby is given a pacifier over and over instead of nursed. In the most severe cases, this can cause slow weight gain and poor milk production. Third, there is the concern about 'triple nipple syndrome' where a baby is both bottle and breastfed AND given a pacifier frequently for comfort. It is believed that over time, this creates a situation where baby stops identifying the breast as THE place for sustenance AND comfort, and starts to lose interest in nursing before a normal weaning time. To counteract that one, it might make sense to encourage as much nursing as you can, both for comforting and feeding, when you are with baby.

    Is your husband cue feeding baby and using paced bottle feeding techniques? These are also important in avoiding breastfeeding issues when baby is getting regular bottles. Bottle feeding Breastfed baby: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000...astfedbaby.pdf and soothing fussy baby: https://www.llli.org/docs/0000000000...ybabyideas.pdf
    Thank you so much for your response! My husband and I read over those documents, we loved the comforting one! We use most of those techniques but there were some on there we had never thought of and haven't read about yet-so thank you! The bottle feeding instructions are spot on with what your lactation consultant suggested to us, so phew, he is definitely doing that right. We will keep an eye on the three things you mentioned. This boy LOVES to nurse, so I'm not super worried he will become disinterested, if he is we will cut the paci for sure. I am also very fortunate that I can arrive at work anytime between 8 and 10 AM so I ALWAYS nurse him before I leave, he takes only two bottles and then I am home to nurse him again by the time he gets hungry! He isn't really a super fussy baby so I don't think the paci will be overused! Thanks again for your help and suggestions everyone!
    Mama to Sebastian Born 2/13/14

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