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Thread: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Hi I hope you can get help closer to home. I thought about it some more, and a one hour breast-feeding clinic sounds way too short. After thinking about it I wonder if that would really be worth traveling so far for. One hour would not even really be enough for a single one on one lactation appointment.
    A pump can appear to be working fine and still not be working fine. Trust me on this. Unless you can have your pump tested which I sincerely doubt if it so hard to even see a lactation consultant it really may not be working appropriately. I would very much suggest adding hand expression to your pumping routine. Pump output is not a good indicator of milk production. However if you're unable to remove milk effectively with a pump, that is going to keep hurting milk production.
    Your pumps website should have information on how to troubleshoot that particular pump. If it doesn't, here are a couple basic tips. Pumping should be comfortable. If you have to turn the suction up very high to the point that it hurts in order to get milk, that is a problem. If your nipple is rubbing against the sides of the tunnel while pumping, that is an indication the pump flange is too small. If too much of your areola is been pulled into the tunnel while you are pumping, that could be an indication your flange is too large. Also if you feel as if you cannot get a good suction or have to manipulate your breast a lot to get good suction, that is another indication the flange is too large. Too large might feel comfortable, but it is not good for getting the milk out.
    I suggest the book making more milk for milk production problems. However we are not sure this is all about milk production right it could be the baby is unable to nurse effectively.
    8 ounces is not all that much to be supplementing. Obviously it would be better if it was less I understand you hoped it would be none. But this is still something you can come back from I promise you.

  2. #12
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    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Also please try to clarify your wake pump policy. It does not make sense to only give mothers a hospital grade pump after milk production is established. They may have a policy of not giving out pumps at all unless the mom is back at work, but in that case it would not be a hospital grade pump I would suspect. Hospital grade pumps are meant for mothers who have to pump in order to increase milk production. They are not meant for mothers whose milk production is already established and the mom is back to work. That is when a personal use count is appropriate. In my experience with WIC breast-feeding programs, is important to you talk to as far as getting the right information. In my area the moms really have to talk to the lactation consultant assuming there is one to get accurate information on the WIC breast-feeding assistance.

  3. #13
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    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Also if you have not changed the little membranes on the pump, do that. Also check the tubing carefully.

  4. #14
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    Jun 2009
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    5,301

    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Sorry for multiple posts. For some reason I can't go back and edit. I am not sure why you should not be the one giving your baby bottles. I know this is probably the least of your worries at this point, but I have no idea where that recommendation comes from. That is a trick if a baby will not take a bottle. If your baby will take a bottle from you I don't know why baby shouldn't take it from you. If you are giving baby a bottle, you can be more sure that is being given in a breast-feeding supportive way. Also you could offer baby a little bit of milk in the bottle, and then the breast, etc. back-and-forth would be a lot easier, and back and forth like that can help a baby continue to equate mom with nursing and comfort and satiety. Supplements can be given prior to a feeding at the breast, right after, at some other time – I think it would just simplify things if you did not have this caveat that you could never give your baby the bottle. On the other hand, if having someone else give baby the supplement helps so that you can go pump or whatever, then you can do that too I just don't like this rule that you cannot supplement your own baby.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Central FL
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    796

    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    Sorry for multiple posts. For some reason I can't go back and edit. I am not sure why you should not be the one giving your baby bottles. I know this is probably the least of your worries at this point, but I have no idea where that recommendation comes from. That is a trick if a baby will not take a bottle. If your baby will take a bottle from you I don't know why baby shouldn't take it from you. If you are giving baby a bottle, you can be more sure that is being given in a breast-feeding supportive way. Also you could offer baby a little bit of milk in the bottle, and then the breast, etc. back-and-forth would be a lot easier, and back and forth like that can help a baby continue to equate mom with nursing and comfort and satiety. Supplements can be given prior to a feeding at the breast, right after, at some other time – I think it would just simplify things if you did not have this caveat that you could never give your baby the bottle. On the other hand, if having someone else give baby the supplement helps so that you can go pump or whatever, then you can do that too I just don't like this rule that you cannot supplement your own baby.
    I don't think it is about Me not doing the supplementing but more about I think avoiding the "nipple confusion" and easy bottle feeding. I've been supplementing with the lactation aid feeding tube set up.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Central FL
    Posts
    796

    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    Also if you have not changed the little membranes on the pump, do that. Also check the tubing carefully.
    got the accessory set new with new membranes in the breast shield attachments.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Central FL
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    796

    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    Hi I hope you can get help closer to home. I thought about it some more, and a one hour breast-feeding clinic sounds way too short. After thinking about it I wonder if that would really be worth traveling so far for. One hour would not even really be enough for a single one on one lactation appointment.
    A pump can appear to be working fine and still not be working fine. Trust me on this. Unless you can have your pump tested which I sincerely doubt if it so hard to even see a lactation consultant it really may not be working appropriately. I would very much suggest adding hand expression to your pumping routine. Pump output is not a good indicator of milk production. However if you're unable to remove milk effectively with a pump, that is going to keep hurting milk production.
    Your pumps website should have information on how to troubleshoot that particular pump. If it doesn't, here are a couple basic tips. Pumping should be comfortable. If you have to turn the suction up very high to the point that it hurts in order to get milk, that is a problem. If your nipple is rubbing against the sides of the tunnel while pumping, that is an indication the pump flange is too small. If too much of your areola is been pulled into the tunnel while you are pumping, that could be an indication your flange is too large. Also if you feel as if you cannot get a good suction or have to manipulate your breast a lot to get good suction, that is another indication the flange is too large. Too large might feel comfortable, but it is not good for getting the milk out.
    I suggest the book making more milk for milk production problems. However we are not sure this is all about milk production right it could be the baby is unable to nurse effectively.
    8 ounces is not all that much to be supplementing. Obviously it would be better if it was less I understand you hoped it would be none. But this is still something you can come back from I promise you.
    I'm sure it is a combination of things, I'll be trying to find some support today.
    Bub seems to be nibbling on my breast more than nursing. He starts swallowing when I insert the feeding tube though.
    So I expect we have a combo of my milk having been a bit slow to come in, lack of adequate stimulation, weak suck, and baby loosing weight, getting weaker, and then the feeding tube making eating easy, no need to suck hard when it will dribble into your mouth and all you have to do is gently suck and swallow.

    I think with last nights extra supplement for baby, his weight is actually going to be better and with the pumping, even if the pump is not that good, I'm actually seeing some improvement in milk supply. My breasts seem to be filling back up again. Friday afternoon and Saturday all day into Sunday morning it seemed they were not really filling back up and baby would nurse but not get enough and was getting weaker all day Saturday. Sunday I was supplementing more because I was worried about him.

    Got enough into him Sunday that he pooped a few times.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Central FL
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    796

    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Well, Appointment at the Peds office shows no weight gain, actually a 1/2 oz weight loss. Checked out latch and nursing technique and that seems ok. Real issue seems to be that my let down reflex isn't working and baby's suck has gotten a bit lazy and he is a sleepy one when there isn't much forthcoming from the act of nursing.
    Dr phoned in a script for a petosin (sp?) nasal spray for me. Seems I didn't realize I should be feeling uterine contractions upon nursing. Odd they never asked me about cramps or contractions in the hospital during the two days after giving birth and nursing those two days. Granted I didn't feel my milk starting to come in till close to discharge time and then we had the horrible weekend of him getting weaker and weaker. Anyway, I'll keep pumping and using the tube feeder to feed him my milk and some supplemental formula and hopefully the script will help me with let down (won't be ready till tomorrow afternoon though.)
    In the mean time I'm trying to get in touch with the WIC office to find out if they can help me with breast pumping (either helping me with nipple shield size or checking to see if the pump I have borrowed is adequate or lending me one of the pumps they have for a few days or a week) until we can get back on track.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,301

    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    I hope the nasal spray helps. But you can work on your letdown in the meantime wiht relaxation and breathing techniques. Also positioning, both for pumping and nursing is important, as you want the most relaxed & comfortable posture possible. The herb fennel is also suggested for let down issues. www.kellymom.com has more info on herbs for breastfeeding as does the book making More milk I mentioned above.

    For sleepy baby at the breast, try breast compressions. You can also try stroking baby, "pumping" babies hand or foot, gently jiggling baby's chin etc. to encourage baby to nurse more vigorously for longer. Look up jack Newman Breastfeeding for info an breast compressions.

    I disagree that it is a given that a mother will feel uterine contractions while nursing. Some do, some don't, and of course the intensity varies tremendously from mother to mother. I personally am someone who had really terrible cramping with my periods, yet never felt uterine contractions much at all while nursing. (despite being told by my oldest childs pediatrician that I would and that they would be very painful!) In other words, please try not to add 'not feeling cramps or contractions' to your list of worries.

    Milk does not typically become more abundant (aka "come in") until a couple of days after birth. I don't know on what day you were discharged but it is common for milk production to not be noticeable until day 2 or 3 of life, and even later in some cases. Before that baby gets colostrum, which is already present in the breasts at birth. Colustrum is all a newborn baby typically needs those first few days, and they will typically lose weight during this period.

    I strongly suggest the book The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, the 8th edition if you can get it. It is inexpensive to purchase, but also your library SHOULD have it.

    I suggest Be very sure all weight checks are on the same scale with baby always dressed the same-preferably, baby in nothing or only a dry diaper. Note the number yourself, and ask that baby be weighed twice each appointment.

    Aside from WIC, have you looked into other possibilities for local breastfeeding assistance? I gather you cannot afford a private practice IBCLC, but maybe someone in your area will give you a break, or if you have health insurance, that may cover an appointment (and possibly pump rental as well.) If you have a local breastfeeding coalition or LLL Leader they may be able to help direct you to someone. If there is a local LLL Leader who can meet with you of course we are volunteers and thus free, but we are not IBCLCs. And of course you can call any LLL Leader anywhere. Please feel welcome to pm me and I will send you my phone number if you would like to speak with me.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,847

    Default Re: 10 day old baby and inadequate milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    I disagree that it is a given that a mother will feel uterine contractions while nursing. Some do, some don't, and of course the intensity varies tremendously from mother to mother.
    I have also read that the strength of the afterpains tends to increase with each child. A first time mom might not feel afterpains at all- I know I didn't, though I felt them quite strongly with baby #2.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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