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Thread: Breastfeeding help

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    rockford,il
    Posts
    700

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    Haha. I'm not totally there yet myself. Taco Bell for dinner last night. I was just not up for cooking. I just didn't want the all natural myth to be spread further. The food industry doesn't need any help, ykwim.
    If you're not ok to drive, then I'd dump the milk.
    I do agree with mommal. There are other ways to help baby deal with fast flow than pumping. It really is sending the opposite signal to your body than you want to send. http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supp.../fast-letdown/
    Mj girl-feel free to start your own thread. 7 weeks is early days. It's likely baby will nurse less in the coming months on their own. Feeding on demand is recommended through the first year, I believe.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,269

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mjgirl View Post
    How long do we continue to feed on demand? My lo is 7 weeks
    On-demand feeding is always good for your baby. Milk is produced on a supply = demand basis, so demand feeding is the best way to ensure that your supply stays equal to your baby's needs. Moms who don't feed on demand are much more likely to "lose" their milk supply and end up supplementing with or switching to formula. Nursing on demand also allows a mom to be very flexible about how she uses the breast. She can use it to meet her baby's need for food and also as a source of comfort; nothing soothes a cranky, tired, sick, or hurting baby better than nursing. So, moms who don't nurse on demand not only risk their milk supplies but also need to find other ways to meet their babies' needs for comfort, and those other ways generally work less well and are much more time-consuming than nursing.

    There is no universally accepted standard for how long a mom must feed on demand. But if you read the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement on breastfeeding carefully, you discover 2 things that I think give you a good idea of what to strive for. First, according to the AAP, after 6 weeks nursing frequency may decline to approximately 8 feedings in a 24 hour period. But increases in nursing frequency can be expected during growth spurts or when an increase in milk volume is required. (In other words, don't put your baby on an 8 feedings per day schedule after 6 weeks, because you never know when your baby is going to need more feedings than that 8 per day minimum.) Second, the AAP recommends that breastmilk be the baby's primary source of nutrition until 1 year, with complementary foods being introduced starting at 6 months. So put those 2 puzzle pieces together, and you come up with on-demand nursing being important throughout the first year.

    Is there a reason why you want to know, mama? Are you feeling worn out by your baby's demand, are you reading a book that advocates scheduling, or is someone in your life telling you that you should schedule?
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    I feed on demand but I have a question about bed time feeding. My lo wok go to bed between 9 and 11 depending on how tired she is. I was setting my alarm and getting up every three to four hours throughout the night to feed her even if she wasn't awake. But last night I let her sleep and waited for her to tell me she was hungry. Which she went 5 hours. Which way is the better more correct way to do night time feedings?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    240

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    Is baby gaining weight ok? If so I would let her sleep. You might want to wake her if you start to feel engorged, or you could hand express just a little if that happens to relieve the discomfort.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    rockford,il
    Posts
    700

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    She's two months, right? And you said weight gain was going well so yeah i agree. Get that extra little sleep for now and just offer to dream feed if you feel uncomfortable.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,766

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    Never any need to stop nursing "on demand." This does not mean a mom must always drop what she is doing and nurse immediately every single time her baby cues, Although your baby will be happier if you nurse sooner rather than later, and especially in the first several months cue feeding helps breast feeding go more smoothly.
    But there is nothing wrong or harmful in cue feeding, so there is never a need to stop nursing when baby requests, as well as whenever mom wishes or her body is signally it is time. In the normal course of things there is never a need to put a baby, a child or an adult on a feeding schedule.
    A baby requests to nurse because baby needs to nurse. Either for hunger/thirst or comfort, and usually both. Nursing does not typically stay the same from birth until baby starts solids. It almost always gets much easier over time unless there are specific issues that are not addressed.
    I suggest not worry how often baby nurses. Babies are meant to nurse quite frequently, growth spurt or no growth spurt. A baby is trying to grow very fast and has a very small tummy. Hence, very frequent feedings. As long as baby is mostly cue fed and baby is gaining well there is no need to even think about that. If nursing is uncomfortable for mom so that frequent nursing sessions are a problem, then the problem to be solved is the discomfort , not the frequent feedings which are 100% normal.
    For fast letdown, I suggest very frequent nursing, nursing in laid back aka biological nurturing position, and if needed hand expressing a little prior to nursing or just taking baby off when the milk starts flowing fast and relatch after catching that first rush in a towel. Pumping prior to every feeding may well cause some serious over production and is a pain. Also an ill fitting or malfunctioning pump or pumping at too high a setting can cause or worsen nipple injury so watch out for that.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    Does anyone know if it's possible and if so how to get my right breast to produce more milk? My right supply is kind of weak especially compared to my left breast.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,766

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    In most cases the simplest and best way to increase milk production, in one breast or both, is to nurse more frequently. If one breast is not producing as well as the other, you can try nursing more frequently on that breast. However it is entirely normal for one breast to produce more than the other. As long as baby gets enough overall it is not usually a big issue.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    So lately my baby has been getting more lazy with opening her mouth for the nipple. How can I get her to open big and wide so my nipple goes in right and how can I keep her positioned correctly on the nipple to stop bad latching and pain.

    *note: I don't have a way to do reclined hold at nighttime in her room.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    240

    Default Re: Breastfeeding help

    If reclined nursing is what works best I would do it anyway, even if that means bringing her to your bed or the couch to nurse. I think you will find if you did a poll that very few breastfed babies stay in their rooms all night.

    When R gets lazy and lets her latch slip I always pop her off and make her do it again. Be patient waiting for the wide-open mouth. It may be that she has to get frustrated and cry - when crying her mouth will be wide open and you can quick latch her on. Do that a few times and she should learn that a wide, deep latch is not only what you are looking for but also the easiest way for her to get the milk. To keep her latched correctly lean back as far as you can - you don't have to recline all the way, even a few degrees should help. If you are using a nursing pillow make sure it is high enough so that baby stays up where she belongs. You might have to put another pillow or a rolled up blanket underneath it. Sometimes I find it easiest to ditch the pillows and hold R's body vertically so her feet are down between my legs.

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