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Thread: Blood in Stool-Diet Changes

  1. #1

    Default Blood in Stool-Diet Changes

    My DS is about 3 mo old and has problems with blood in his stool since he was about a month old. When he was a week old he had really mucousy diapers and the doc thought it was either foremilk/hindmilk imbalance (I was using a shield at the time, not anymore) or a food sensitivity. They had me cut out obvious forms of dairy and when I reintroduced them at 1 month, he had some blood in his diaper. There was blood in one diaper each day for two days. The amount was tiny (one small streak and a speck) and it was bright red. Easy to miss if not looking for it. Only showed up for those two diapers then stopped, but I still stopped obvious dairy again. Nothing there for a couple of weeks then for a couple of diapers over 2 days there was a small streak, sometimes just a speck of blood. It stopped then same thing a few weeks later. A few days ago the doc said to eliminate hidden dairy as well, like whey, casein, and any dairy ingredients in labels. Then yesterday he had two bloody diapers with more blood than normal, but he has also been on an antibiotic for a couple of days for a toe infection (don't know if that could be a factor). He is a happy baby, growing well, no signs of an issue in his behavior. I'm wondering if I should cut out soy as well and if it helps maybe reintroduce foods under doc supervision to see what the issue is.

    Anyone have experience with this? Should I cut out soy along with all dairy (hidden and obvious)? How long does it take to see change?

    I'm concerned for my DS. The doc also said if it gets any worse from showing up every 2 weeks or continues till 6 mo that they'll scope him and put him on a special formula. I can't imagine this formula is better than EBF but I'm not a doc, so it could be.

    Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: Blood in Stool-Diet Changes

    Welcome to the forum!

    How is your baby's weight gain? Is your baby basically happy and healthy and developing normally, or are there concerns aside from the bloody poops?

    The next time you go in to see the pediatrician, I suggest you bring a printout of this: http://www.bfmed.org/Media/Files/Pro...d%20Infant.pdf. It's the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine's protocol for managing allergic proctocolitis in a breastfed baby. It is worth noting that even in cases of "severe" allergic proctocolitis (which would include a diagnosis of failure to thrive, "moderate to large" amounts of blood in the stool combined with decreasing hemoglobin levels, and protein-losing enteropathy) the ABM does not recommend switching the baby to a special formula. Rather, in severe cases, the ABM recommends a maternal elimination diet, continued breastfeeding, and referral to a pediatric gastroenterologist.

    Basically, what I'm saying is that if your baby's only symptom is a small amount of blood in the stool, there is no reason to worry and no reason to think about switching to formula, and your doctor's reaction sounds excessive. And pediatricians do have variable reactions to bloody stools. For example, when my second daughter produced one of her worst blood-streaked stools in the pediatrician's office, the doctor took a look, shrugged, and said "Garden variety proctitis. Peaks at 3-5 months. Eliminate dairy if you want."
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3

    Default Re: Blood in Stool-Diet Changes

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    Welcome to the forum!

    How is your baby's weight gain? Is your baby basically happy and healthy and developing normally, or are there concerns aside from the bloody poops?

    The next time you go in to see the pediatrician, I suggest you bring a printout of this: http://www.bfmed.org/Media/Files/Pro...d%20Infant.pdf. It's the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine's protocol for managing allergic proctocolitis in a breastfed baby. It is worth noting that even in cases of "severe" allergic proctocolitis (which would include a diagnosis of failure to thrive, "moderate to large" amounts of blood in the stool combined with decreasing hemoglobin levels, and protein-losing enteropathy) the ABM does not recommend switching the baby to a special formula. Rather, in severe cases, the ABM recommends a maternal elimination diet, continued breastfeeding, and referral to a pediatric gastroenterologist.

    Basically, what I'm saying is that if your baby's only symptom is a small amount of blood in the stool, there is no reason to worry and no reason to think about switching to formula, and your doctor's reaction sounds excessive. And pediatricians do have variable reactions to bloody stools. For example, when my second daughter produced one of her worst blood-streaked stools in the pediatrician's office, the doctor took a look, shrugged, and said "Garden variety proctitis. Peaks at 3-5 months. Eliminate dairy if you want."
    Sorry for the delayed response. Didn't see a notification in my email that anyone commented. Yes, his weight gain is awesome. At our most recent appointment the doctor made it clear that he would not consider formula unless there is a large amount of blood with every diaper change and he wasn't gaining weight. Yay! Doesn't look like formula would ever be suggested. Luckily, I think we are closer to finding the culprit and things are improving. Thank you so much for the link and response!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Blood in Stool-Diet Changes

    My son has an allergy to milk protein and that was one of the signs he had the allergy. We thought we were seeing tiny spots of blood in his diapers around 3 months but weren't sure. We brought it up to his doctor and he ended up getting tested for it. I ended up going dairy free but it took awhile for dairy to leave my system. Even though I stopped eating all dairy, it took about 2 weeks for my son's test to come up negative. Also you might not see blood but it may still be there just not visible to the eye. The test is able to confirm it.

    I would give up all dairy first and see how he is after 2 weeks. For us dairy was the problem not soy.

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