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Thread: Boobs floppy now. Low milk supply?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    27

    Default Boobs floppy now. Low milk supply?

    I've been exclusively breastfeeding my son since birth. He's now 3 months and 1 week. Our nursing relationship has been rocky with fast flow, but now he nurses ok when we lay down.

    For the past week, my boobs rarely feel full anymore (expect for my left side which has always been my heavy hitter) My left side is fuller, but not a whole lot. My boobs seem floppy(more extra skin) more and even after 3 hours between feeds I'm not full. Is this the normal pattern. I was kinda liking having bigger boobs for awhile. Now, I seem to be back to my pre-pregnancy size.

    The stomach flu is going around my house and I'm concerned that if I get it, my milk supply will majorly drop and I won't be able to recover my milk supply.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,847

    Default Re: Boobs floppy now. Low milk supply?

    What you're experiencing is absolutely normal. Most moms start out making too much milk- it's nature's way of ensuring that the babies get fed while they master the art of nursing. When a mom is making too much milk, she's likely to feel full or engorged a lot of the time, to leak a lot, and to be able to pump a lot of milk (if she is pumping). But making too much milk isn't something a mom wants to do long term- it's a waste of energy, it puts the mom at increased risk for plugged ducts and mastitis, and making too much milk can mean fast letdowns which can make it difficult for the baby to nurse. So after a while, supply adjusts to meet dmand very precisely, without a lot of extra milk being made. Once that adjustment takes place, it's normal for a mom to rarely if ever feel full, to leak less or not at all, to feel weaker letdown sensation or no letdown sensation at all, to need to use 2 breasts at a feeding even if she's only been nursing on one at a time, and to see her pump output decline (if she's pumping). Her baby may be fussy when this adjustment takes place, because the baby has to get used to a new, more assertive style of nursing.

    There is nothing you need to be doing right now aside from nursing on demand and not supplementing. That is the best way to maintain supply. And even if you do get the stomach flu, it doesn't mean the end of nursing: milk supply is designed to be flexible, and to respond to increased demand.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Boobs floppy now. Low milk supply?

    Thanks for your reply--you specifically have helped me enormously since I've joined this forum! My son very rarely if ever takes both boobs during a feeding. He will eat from one side for about 5 minutes and shows signs that he's had enough. I try to offer the other breast, but then he cries. So, I take him off and he's happy and content. I feed him in two hours from the other side and we repeat the process. Like I said, very rarely do both breasts get used at a session. My breasts are softer now and when I do pump which is very rare(maybe once a week) I will get about an ounce out of my right and 4 ounces from my left (I have no problem with supply from my left side). So, my question is if he eats every 2-3 hours ( I have offered him more, but he usually cries and acts uninterested before the 2 hour mark) and only takes one side at a time...that means one boob is not being used for 4+ hours. Is this a problem when it comes to supply? I really don't want to pump if I don't have to.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,847

    Default Re: Boobs floppy now. Low milk supply?

    As long as you are following your baby's lead, nursing on demand, and offering the second breast at every feeding, I don't think a 4-5 hour stretch without nursing is likely to be a problem.

    Every time you go a long time without removing milk from the breast, your body does get the message that it's probably making more milk than is necessary, and supply probably adjusts downwards a little bit. This is rarely a problem because if your supply starts to dip too low, your baby just nurses more often, or nurses on both breasts instead of just one, and that increased stimulation bumps supply back up to where the baby needs it to be.

    Any concerns, watch diaper output. As long as that continues to be normal, baby's getting enough.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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