Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    330

    Default Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

    My baby is turning 12 weeks old tomorrow. For the past few days he's nursing for only a few minutes, if I'm lucky, sometimes going a long while without eating. He'll suck for a bit and then just pull off, and he'll kick up a fuss if I try to keep him there in nursing position! He is happy, though, which boggles my mind. He has wet and dirty diapers. He eats two pumped bottles at the babysitter each day and he's been fine with those, but yesterday he even refused the second bottle. When I nurse him, most of the time he just plays around at the boob, so he doesn't even get any letdown. We do have an appointment at the pediatrician on Tuesday morning, but I'm wondering what this not eating is all about! I don't think he's teething because I don't see any excess drooling really.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

    My guess is he is getting more efficient at nursing, that can happen around three months. I'd say as long as he's having plenty of wet/dirty diapers, just go with the flow. Keep offering but don't insist, if that makes sense
    Ryder James 1/21/13

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,741

    Default Re: Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

    I agree with esther. 3 months is a classic time for mothers to become concerned about their babies nursing habits and/or changes in their breasts that they think mean some kind of problem. Another thing that typically happens at this age is that weight gain rate slows down. But in fact, all of this is it is usually normal. I would not suspect a growth spurt, but rather, the opposite-baby does not need a ton of milk at the moment and so is nor taking it. If baby ramps up nursing frequency or length at some point, that might indicate a growth spurt, and that would also be normal.

    Just as a general caution, be careful baby sitter is not overfeeding. It's a common issue and can cause breastfeeding issues. It sounds as if she is doing well, as baby was not forced to eat that bottle when baby did not want it. That’s good. But jic here are some tips for bottle feeding just fyi http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    330

    Default Re: Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

    Thanks for the replies. Baby has been eating a little better over the weekend. I was wondering about another thing, though. If he doesn't eat well for one feeding (i.e. he only eats for a few minutes instead of 15-20 minutes), will that negatively impact my milk supply? And how long does it take for my body to learn to produce only what baby needs?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,259

    Default Re: Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

    If he doesn't eat well for one feeding (i.e. he only eats for a few minutes instead of 15-20 minutes), will that negatively impact my milk supply?
    Not as long as he's fed on demand and is fed enough overall. You can expect a baby to have a mix of long and short feedings. Sometimes the baby is really hungry and eats a lot, sometimes he just wants a snack or a drink. Sometimes the baby wants to settle in for a long, leisurely, comfortable nursing session, sometimes he's going to be all business and get his needs met very quickly.

    And how long does it take for my body to learn to produce only what baby needs?
    The answer to this question varies widely between individuals. Some moms will adjust within a few days or weeks, some will continue to produce excess milk for months. And remember, the adjustment process isn't a one-time thing. It continues as long as your baby nurses. If he needs more milk, more nursing will result in greater supply. If he needs less, or mom limits the baby's nursing opportunities, the baby will take less and milk supply will dwindle.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    177

    Default Re: Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

    Hi. I don't mean to crash this post, but I have a follow-up question to the reply above. Overnight I often wake and then become aware that baby has been rooting and asking to feed for a while. She's right next to me in the cosleeper, but I'm a deep sleeper and it can take me half an hour or who-knows-how long to hear her and come up from the depths of sleep enough to feed her. By this point my breasts are often very full. This happens during the two feedings during the night. Overnight she will go five hours from start to start of feedings. I'm wondering how this might affect milk supply. Baby is now eight weeks old. (We still aren't coordinated to get a good latch while il half-asleep or in side lying position).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    330

    Default Re: Can not eating be a sign of a growth spurt?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*jessicanewmom View Post
    Hi. I don't mean to crash this post, but I have a follow-up question to the reply above. Overnight I often wake and then become aware that baby has been rooting and asking to feed for a while. She's right next to me in the cosleeper, but I'm a deep sleeper and it can take me half an hour or who-knows-how long to hear her and come up from the depths of sleep enough to feed her. By this point my breasts are often very full. This happens during the two feedings during the night. Overnight she will go five hours from start to start of feedings. I'm wondering how this might affect milk supply. Baby is now eight weeks old. (We still aren't coordinated to get a good latch while il half-asleep or in side lying position).
    Hi, my baby was also sleeping 5 hour stretches at night by 8 weeks. I didn't find that affecting milk supply. During the day, baby still ate normally. Regarding noticing that she's hungry, why don't you set a vibrating alarm clock under your pillow for say, 4 hours? This way, baby wouldn't be so hungry by the time you feed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •