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Thread: Breastmilk Preference

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Default Breastmilk Preference

    My son turned 1 last week and we are going to continue nursing. I have heard that after 1, more calories should come from food and less from milk, but I am struggling with a little boy who much prefers his bottles of breast milk or nursing to any other food he is offered. I am a full time working mom, away from baby 11 hours a day, and I had been pumping 3 times a day to supply 15ozs of milk for our separation. I am really ready to cut back the pumping to 2x's a day (approx 10 oz) but little boy isn't ready to cut back on the bottles. He refused to eat his solids until he was given a bottle today. He's on the shrimpy side of the growth chart so I do obsess over his intake a little.

    Is the breast milk addiction normal? Is there a way to encourage him to eat and drink other things? What should I realistically expect for pumping obligations with a one year old??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    358

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    I can't help you, but I can commiserate and say that DS25mo declared himself a "nurse-ivore" yesterday, which is a pretty accurate characterization.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Montreal
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    109

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    I don't think kids work with calendars, so it's understandable that they don't suddenly start eating more solids as soon as they turn one. Even the ones that do eat "well" have off days. Your son sounds very normal to me.

    When you say you want to cut back the bottles of ebm while you're separated, do you plan to replace that bottle with another drink, such as cow's milk?

    I know what it's like to want to cut back the pumping at work (takes so long! Distracts from what you're in the middle of! Not as cute as a nursling!) and at the same time, to want to make sure your kid has what they need. That's probably why I was the last mom still sending ebm to daycare and have only really stopped now that DD is 17 months old. I dropped progressively and sometimes increased again. Sometimes i was just able to fit in a third session, sometimes I just pumped a lot at one session, sometimes I felt guilty and wanted to make sure DD had enough. In my case, she was given cow's milk as an alternative.
    Mama to a sweet kitty born July 2012.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    2,209

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    Babies definitely differ in how quickly they take to solids - I've seen big differences between my three kids. It's not like something changes from one moment to the next when they turn one. I think it's up to you what you want to do with the pumping. As isabelofmti suggests, if you do want to cut back on pumping, but you feel like LO still is wanting more milk, you can consider substituting animal's milk. Between nursing when you are together and pumping twice a day that is still a lot of breast milk for your baby!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    80

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    We are dairy - sensitive in my family, so I am going slow with all animal milks. Yogurt causes an upset belly sometimes, so I am nervous about cow's milk. Our pediatrician recommended rice milk, but I don't want to do that in any significant volume.

    I am just so tired of the pump and my employer is so tired of the time it takes me to pump! I am ready, but little boy is holding fast to his preference.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    California
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    418

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    For what it's worth, my son was much the same way at age 1. I pumped until he was 14.5 months old because he wasn't ready for a primarily-solids diet during the day until then. I don't think there's anything abnormal about a 12 month old wanting most of their intake to be breastmilk. I might have kept pumping for longer except that we were able to introduce cow's milk as a substitute.

    Is there any other milk substitute you'd feel okay about giving? Soy milk? Goat milk? That would help you ease up on the pumping. Otherwise, time will take care of this problem, it just might take several more months before your baby takes enough solids that you can give up pumping at work. One thing I did was starting around 13 months, I had my mom (who watches DS while I work) offer solids prior to a bottle. Up until then, I'd had her offer the bottle first. It was a relatively seamless transition over the next month or so to him not taking a bottle during the day and eating more solids.
    First-time mama to Joshua, 10/29/11. 29 months and going strong! for 14 months; now finished with pump weaning!

  7. #7
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    Oct 2012
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    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    The dairy sensitivity does make it harder. If you don't have animal milk as a fall-back, and you want to back down on pumping (which I completely understand!), the other option is to be more aggressive with the solids. In addition to offering solids first, as joshuas.mommy suggests (though it sounds like he had his own ideas about that!), some other suggestions I've seen for encouraging a recalcitrant solids-eater are: make eating fun (fun patterns of food on the plate, for example; or giving baby the option to "dip" - my kids love dipping, including combinations which I find really weird); allow LO to roam and eat, so that eating does not take him away from other things he'd rather be doing, like playing - for example, having a plate of goodies easily available in the play area; make sure to offer a variety of foods, as toddlers are notoriously picky (one day he might like one thing, the next day he might not). Some of these might be harder to do in the context of daycare (they may have their own ideas about "grazing" patterns of eating due to mess), but you could still try them on the weekends - maybe it will at least start to get him more interested in solids. And I agree that things can change fast - a 12 month old may have no interest in solids, but then at 14 months be much more enthusiastic. There are babies though that do take longer, so that's where it can help to be proactive with encouraging solids. And perhaps if he is really insisting on having the bottle first, putting a little less in the bottle so he doesn't completely fill up on milk and has a little room left over for some solids?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    20,944

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    I have heard that after 1, more calories should come from food and less from milk
    But there's no need to force the transition. It will happen spontaneously if you just let your child lead the way, discovering solids at his own pace. Give him a variety of healthy foods, a variety of textures, and model good eating habits. He will mimic whatever you do.

    When I was concerned about my first daughter's lack of interest in solids, my pediatrician told me that until the first birthday, breastmilk or formula alone meet all a baby's needs. After the first birthday, solids become an increasingly important part of the baby's diet, but the transition from needing only breastmilk to needing a ton of solids is often a slow one, with many children not repeating much solid food until well into their second year. My girls were like that- neither one ate more than a few teaspoons of solids per day until 14-15 months. It's not like a baby goes from being able to subsist on nothing but milk on day 364 of life, to needing a ton of solids on day 365. So, frustrating as your child's eating habits may be, they're normal.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,410

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    As long as there is enough milk, and the child is being offered solid foods, (they are not being withheld from a hungry, eager to eat child) I fail to see how this is a problem. From what source did you hear that 'after one year, more calories should come from solids' and on what research is that based? I see many issues with such a command.

    On the other hand, I understand you wanting to be able to stop pumping while at work! I don't really have a solution for you there, I just think your child is normal. Ounce for ounce, breastmilk is the most nutritionally complete single food your baby can eat-or will ever eat.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    547

    Default Re: Breastmilk Preference

    Have you tried mixing your EBM in any foods that your LO eats (like with some mashed banana)? I know lots of people on here are strictly BLS, but it might be a halfway solution that your LO will accept. It won't stop you pumping yet, but may help him get a little more interested in solids for now.
    Mom to my sweet little "Pooper," born 10/12/11, and "Baby Brother," born 6/23/2014, and married to heavy metal husband. Working more than full-time, making healthy vegetarian meals for family, and trying to keep up with exercise routine.

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