Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 41

Thread: I need help

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: I need help

    Thanks for the responses I have found them encouraging. Yes, the fast flow makes more sense to me. I've tried everything. Pumped before, changed positions, feed more frequently. Why does 3 am feedings seem to go more smoothly though? Especially when I am more full at that time?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    COUGARTOWN Baby! From here on in!
    Posts
    17,465

    Default Re: I need help

    Because he's asleep. And is eating instinctually.
    When you say change positions what do you mean? Because I has OALD and my baby ate best in a sitting up position. It helped him swallow without getting overwhelmed. I would sit him in the corner of the chair or couch so he was all propped up and sort of dangle my breast in his mouth. When he was super tiny and my breast wouldn't reach I would prop the boppy or pillow under neath him. I wouldn't quit if I were you. Your baby is getting enough to eat. And dealing with OALD is not painful. Frustrating sure but babies get over it if they understand that this is what you need to do to get food. And eventually they learn to cope. They click or they start doing the pop off trick. Breastmilk is so much better in terms of nutrition and protection against so many things. I would actually stop using the bottle altogether if possible. Because probably part of the issue is that he knows that there is an easier way to get food. Quit reminding him of that. Let him think that this the way he gets food. Through you. My baby sputter and coughed and would get milk in his hair and we would go to the Lactation Consultant and she would be all concerned at how loudly he clicked. Said there was an issue with the latch. But it wasn't preventing him from getting adequate nutrition from my breast. And this isn't preventing your son from that either. The thing is, at this point, that's the MAIN thing about breastfeeding this early in the game. Is giving the baby nutrition and protection. The bonding and feeling close comes later. So keep at it Mama! It's the best thing you can do for you baby you won't be sorry you stuck it out.

    Way too lazy for formula

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: I need help

    The positions I have tried is laying down, him on top of me, him sitting up. Yes, he comes off and on... off and on...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    COUGARTOWN Baby! From here on in!
    Posts
    17,465

    Default Re: I need help

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mackeroo2013 View Post
    The positions I have tried is laying down, him on top of me, him sitting up. Yes, he comes off and on... off and on...
    That's normal. He's learning to cope with the flow.

    Way too lazy for formula

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,476

    Default Re: I need help

    You had mentioned earlier how often he eats. Are you feeding him by the clock or on demand, when he asks? I often found with my girls that if I watched their queues closely and I nursed when they were first showing signs of hunger, we had a much easier time nursing. If I waited, got delayed, etc. the feeding didn't go anywhere near as calmly. They'd be hungry, frustrated, etc.

    Try offering the breast more often. You can't make a baby breast feed. He'll only take it if he wants to. Very different from a bottle which can be "forced", if he wants it or not. Not in a mean way, but you can put a bottle in a baby's mouth even if he doesn't want it. People call it coaxing, but it's just a nice way of forcing them to take it. You can't really do that with a breast.

    Are you using a nursing pillow? It may help in terms of him being able to settle in, snuggle up and take the breast easily as he wants it. Baby wearing may offer the same thing, quick and easy access for you both (although I found it required more coordination than I had some days ).

    I'd probably try taking the weekend, banishing all bottles and just nurse, nurse, nurse. You two need to find your own rhythm without any interruptions. Get everything you need (water, reading material, snacks, internet, remote, etc.) and build a nursing station. Just camp out with each other. You're both learning and you will get there. You can do it!!

    ETA: I wanted to add that at 3 - 5 minutes, your flow may slow down a bit. So he could be getting frustrated that it's not as easy as it is at the beginning with your initial letdown. I'd try to make sure that things are quiet when I'm nursing so he'd be really nicely relaxed and not distracted. If he's nice and warm, there's no pressure or noise, and there's no offer of a bottle he should settle back in.

    His weight gain is good. He's telling you he's had enough. His diapers sound good. So let him dictate his own routine! I found when I stopped having expectations and just "let them be" they hit their own routine which was MUCH better. It's really hard to let that go - expecting what they "should" be doing, when and for how long. It's also really liberating when you find that they're doing just perfectly well without those expectations.
    Last edited by @llli*amysmom; November 23rd, 2013 at 10:06 AM.
    Mommy to our DD1 early bird (34 weeks, 2 days, 7lbs, 14oz)! Oct. 2nd, 2008 Emergency C-Section, Frank Breech, HEALTHY Girl!
    Weaned @ 17 months
    Our DD2 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 12oz) Aug. 10th, 2010 Our Successful VBAC, growing like a bad weed!
    Weaned @ 15 months
    Our DD3 early bird (37 weeks, 3 days, 7lbs, 6oz) Feb. 16th, 2012 Our 2nd VBAC and lightening speedy birth!

    Loving being a Mom of 3, 40 months apart!!
    and

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,594

    Default Re: I need help

    OK, I had fast flow with 3 babies. So, just fyi, here is what worked for me, personally.

    *Nursed frequently-as often as baby wanted, and whenever I wanted, even if it meant waking baby to nurse (or encouraging baby to nurse in sleep)
    *Nursed 'laid back' with baby more or less on top of me, and usually with baby's head above thier tummy to some degree. If laid back nursing is not comfortabel for you, or not working for some reason, please let us know. There are lots of adjustments to try.
    *Nursing sidelying at night/naptime
    *Let baby nurse one side at a time, for as long (or as short) a time as baby wished. I let baby switch sides if baby wanted.
    *When baby popped off, I would hold a cloth under the breast to catch any milk that came out. Sometimes it sprayed, sometimes it dribbled. I did not worry about saving this milk. I let that first 'rush' go into the cloth, and relatched baby when it slowed down.
    *I practiced patience! It takes a little time for thsese measures to work. I told myself that in the normal course of things, milk production and fast letdown slows down over time. The first 4-6 weeks or so after birth, if all is going normally, milk production increases. Then, it stops increasing, and, if mom has been making too much milk, it gradually slows down to what baby needs. (This is all assuming baby continues to nurse frequently as is normal and there is no 'extra' pumping.) So by letting nature take it's course, fast letdown and/or overproduction usually solves itself. At the same time, baby is figuring out nursing.

    I never 'block nursed" (let baby nurse on one side for 2 or more feedings. I could have, because the weight gain was always very fast, but for me it was too much trouble and the other measures worked over time so I never thought it was needed. Block feeding carries the risk of decreasing milk produciton too much, so caution should be taken before/when it is tried. If you would like more info on block nursing please let us know.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: I need help

    Thanks for all your replies. I stay at home with my baby so I nurse him often and yes this helps. Since his nursing sessions are so short, do I need to worry about my milk drying up? I pump once in the morning maybe twice some days because I don't want to get mastitis and don't want to dry up. I have no clue how the whole process works.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,117

    Default Re: I need help

    Milk supply is created and maintained by the baby's demand. As long as you allow your baby to nurse when he wants, you will make enough milk for him, no matter how short or long his nursing sessions are. In general, there is no need for a mom who is home with her baby and nursing on demand to pump unless she wants to store milk for a return to work or for bottles for a sitter.

    The only exception to the supply = demand rule is that sometimes outside forces (e.g. another pregnancy, the use of a contraindicated medication, the use of the wrong type of hormonal contraceptive, etc.) can cause a mom's milk to diminish even when she's nursing on demand.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: I need help

    Thanks. Someone told me the times I feel full to pump so there is not as much in my breasts to flow out at him. So, this is not true? Do I need to worry about mastitis if I feel full a lot? Not engorged. Just full.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,117

    Default Re: I need help

    People are really quick to recommend pumping, without stopping for one moment to think about what that means for the mom. More work, at a time when she does. not. need. more work! And if she has a problem with oversupply, pumping out all the additional milk will maintain that oversupply, or maybe even make it worse.

    Plugged ducts and mastitis are more common in moms with overabundant milk supplies. But an increased risk is not a guarantee, particularly for moms who are not prone to mastitis. That's why the best way to manage oversupply is to let the baby do it. If oversupply means that the flow is too fast for the baby, don't try to fix it with the pump. Give the baby a chance to figure out how to manage it (by pulling off when letdown is too strong, or adjusting his sucking pattern). If you're full a lot of the time, and feeling uncomfortable, don't use the pump to take that milk, thereby telling your body to make the same excess amount all over again. Instead, put up with the fullness for a bit and see if your body gets the message to reduce supply.

    Now, if you suddenly come down with mastitis, then it may be important to use the pump to drain the breast. But cross that bridge if and when you come to it. For now, I would shelve the pump!
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •