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Thread: more efficient nursing sessions?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    10

    Default more efficient nursing sessions?

    So, my supply issue isn't as much of an issue as I'd thought, but I can't make enough to satisfy him in one session. DS3 is 6 weeks and still wants to nurse at 15 minute intervals and I have to get things more efficient because it's really interferring with time spent on anything else (especially my other 3 LOs). If I pump after every session and save it up, then give him a 4 oz bottle, he'll go 3 hours before he's hungry again. Asde from exclusively pumping, what can I do? TIA!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,617

    Default Re: more efficient nursing sessions?

    Keep working at it. You can do compressions while he sucks, too. My little guys are still poor at milk removal at 8 weeks and I do pump after each session and give them more milk through a tube/SNS type of system so they get satisfied at breast, not bottle. It would be great if you could use a baby scale and see what he gets each session for a few days.
    Nursed my sweet daughter 3 years, 3 mos.

  3. #3

    Default Re: more efficient nursing sessions?

    Is there is an actual barrier to baby nursing efficiently (poor latch, weak suck, slow let down, low milk production) Has baby been gaining appropriately at the breast?

    Because if there is, working on those issues may help (switching sides frequently for low production, breast compressions for sleepy baby or slow letdown/slow 'flow', changing positioning and latch technique to help fix latch, are just some examples ) I am not sure how pumping is helping at this point? if baby can get enough at the breast (which you tell by baby’s weight gain, not how long baby 'goes' without eating) then pumping after nursing sessions seems like a lot of extra work.

    But near constant nursing is normal in the newborn stage. A baby nurses for reasons other than hunger, the frequent nursing is going to help with any low production, and an infant needs what he needs whether he has siblings or not. I would suggest thinking about things you can do with your other children while nursing or wearing baby in a sling or wrap. I also would suggest, arrange playdates so another adult can help with your older kids, look into hiring a mothers helper, make sure you are asking family & friends for specific help (Often offers of help dry up when its the 2, 3, 4th kid because people assume you don't need help. So ask.)
    Your baby will not always need to nurse so much. This is a temporary situation.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: more efficient nursing sessions?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    Is there is an actual barrier to baby nursing efficiently (poor latch, weak suck, slow let down, low milk production) Has baby been gaining appropriately at the breast?
    He has been gaining sufficiently (slowly at first, but he's where he should be now), his latch is good, idk about his suck, I do have an OALD, he often gags and splutters during his morning feed but it seems fine throughout the rest of the day, and I switch feed. My best guess is that he's too impatient to wait for more (I have a series of small letdowns with about 5 minutes in between) and so falls asleep, only to wake up, still hungry, 10-15 minutes later. He will literally be at my breast from 5 pm to midnight with pause only for my own physical needs. He does sleep in 5 hour blocks overnight as a payoff, though.

    The pumping helps increase supply because he never stays awake long enough to finish (I'm still supplimenting 6-10 oz of formula unless I pump, then he only needs the pumped milk). Plus it gives me time to do the basic necessities (I live away from friends and family and cannot budget outside help!). I think I answered everything! Lol! Thanks!

  5. #5

    Default Re: more efficient nursing sessions?

    OK I did not realize you were supplementing. Of course if supplements are needed, the best option healthwise is for those supplements to be moms own expressed milk.

    Is the current plan due to the slow weight gain? Are you pumping and supplementing due to a plan given to you by an IBCLC? If anything I am saying is going against a plan you have been given by your breastfeeding support person, please just ignore me.

    Speaking generally, many mothers find that combining nursing, pumping and bottles more tiring than only nursing, and also, there are often problems that arise due to pumping, supplements and bottles especially in the early weeks. So that is why I typically will suggest that if the supplementing, pumping and bottles are not needed, best to avoid them. However, every situation is different and each mom will find what works best for her situation.

    Generally, when a mother makes enough milk and baby can extract it, there is no need for pumping or supplementing. Some babies need to nurse more often than others, but generally, as long as baby can get the milk out and mom makes enough milk, exclusively nursing (no pumping, no supplementing) is possible.

    Sometimes even when baby is getting enough at the breast some pumping is still suggested to protect milk production- for example, if mom is using nipple shields.

    Baby is at your breast basically all day, yet baby also "falls asleep before baby is finished." Do you mean baby is falling asleep while nursing and you cannot unlatch without baby waking?

    If a baby who is gaining normally falls asleep while nursing, then baby is finished. Baby may object to being unlatched (wishes to comfort nurse or simply to be held longer) and/or baby may wish to nurse again soon, but neither indicates on its own a need for pumping.

    If your baby IS getting frustrated with the flow at the breast, could it be in part due to "flow confusion' from the bottles? As long as you keep giving bottles I suggest offer small amounts (2-3 ounces at a time) given in a breastfeedig supportive way, such as described here: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf

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