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Thread: Drop in pump output- how do I check the motor?

  1. #1

    Default Drop in pump output- how do I check the motor?

    If this were talk radio I'd say long time listener, first time caller as I read the boards every day while I pump at work! My little girl is almost 9 months and just started mostly sleeping through the night last week. I think that might be related to why I've gone from 6 oz in my am pump to 3 oz all of a sudden, and I get another 3 oz if I'm lucky in the pm. She takes 8-9 oz during the day at day care so this is making me have to dip into my freezer stash.

    I've changed the parts on my Hygeia EnRiche, started eating oatmeal, and am still drinking Mother's Milk tea but haven't seen an increase. I haven't changed my pumping routine at all. I'm wondering if I should get the motor checked on my pump as I've seen suggested before, but I don't know how to do that. I haven't tried power pumping yet, but will do that today to see if it helps. Can I blame it on the motor? Do I need to set an alarm and pump overnight? I am determined to make it to a year. Any and all suggestions greatly welcomed and appreciated!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Drop in pump output- how do I check the motor?

    I'm sorry, we missed your post! How are things going now?

    It seems like a lot of moms see a drop in pumping output at around 7 or 8 months... I don't have personal experience, but hopefully someone who does will come along.

    In the meantime, here are some other threads about decreased pumping output:

    Decreased supply while pumping

    Pumping output
    Karen
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Drop in pump output- how do I check the motor?

    Thanks for checking on me! I just figured everyone else saw 9 months, decreased output and saw what I was apparently in denial about- the dreaded pump slump. I'm still pumping about 6 oz a day, but she refused bottles and sippies with milk all week at day care last week so I managed to keep up with her demands at least- of course I'm not thrilled that she's refusing milk though! I have been tasting everything before I bag it up and I taste the defrosted milk (trying to rotate one bag a day from my freezer stash) to make sure it all tastes fine, and it does. She's never been a fan of bottles, but this is a whole new level for her! I know solids before one are just for fun, but I've started having her teachers put the milk she refused in with some oatmeal and she eats that instead. I was sending her with 3 oz bottles, but have scaled back to 2 to minimize waste.

    So the current new plan is something like this for the past week:

    - Wake her up at 6:45, nurse both sides
    - She gets a 2 oz bottle around 9:00, mixed with oatmeal if she refuses
    - She gets 2 oz fruit mixed with yogurt around 10:30
    - I nurse her at lunch
    - She naps
    - She gets a 2 oz bottle around 3:00, mixed with oatmeal if she refuses
    - She gets 2 oz vegetable around 4:00
    - I nurse her at 5:45 when we get home, both sides
    - She has dinner with us- some finger foods, another fruit or veggie
    - I nurse her down to sleep from about 8:00-8:30
    - About every third night she wakes up and we nurse

    Am I shooting myself in the foot by offering her solids as a way to get her to take more milk? It's about a 60/40 split with whether she'll take the bottle or not. After I typed all this out I'm worried my attempts to get milk in her tummy are actually sabotaging my supply. Help, please! (and thank you!)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Drop in pump output- how do I check the motor?

    I think at this age if she's simply refusing the milk in the bottle it is okay to give her solids to tide her over, and if you're mixing them, it's a great way to get the milk in her. I think if it were me I would stop giving her solids at night though. I would push nursing as much as you can when you're together, offering even when she doesn't ask. I might also stop offering the non-milk mixed solids at 10:30 and 4 just to see if her appetite for milk increases. They can't really regulate their intake very well when it is being given to them on a spoon like that and if she's actually eating all that you've listed here, that is quite a lot of solids for a baby that age. I think if you continue with this schedule it is very likely to have an impact on your supply, if it hasn't already.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  5. #5

    Default Re: Drop in pump output- how do I check the motor?

    Thank you for looking our schedule and making suggestions! I really do appreciate it as everything had been humming along nicely and now it's a whole new ballgame and I'm just so confused about how to handle it.

    I definitely make it a point to offer more on the weekends, as she is too busy playing to ever stop and ask and I want to keep up supply, but I could do a better job in the evenings and will try skipping solids tonight. I like the idea of thinking of the evenings as little weekends- a solid chunk of time where I'm available to nurse. I am always worried I'm underfeeding her solids when I see how much her classmates come in with every day, but mama's milk is better than anything those little squirts are eating! Thanks for the objective review.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Drop in pump output- how do I check the motor?

    Nah, don't worry about underfeeding solids. Breastmilk should be making up the majority of her nutrition, so if you feel solids may be interfering with that, it's perfectly fine (advisable, even) to back off on them a bit. Have you looked into baby led solids at all? It's a process where you offer age-appropriate finger foods (rather than purees) and allow them to choose how much, if any, they eat. It works particularly well with breast fed babies who are used to regulating their own intake. I loved it with my kids because it meant I could actually eat at the same time as them and they felt like they were participating in meal times. I'd nurse right before dinner, pop them in their high chair at the table and we'd all 'eat' together. You can just give baby what you're eating for the most part, assuming you eat relatively healthy meals, though you'd want to cut it in the proper size pieces (that article I linked gives some great ideas for that). And you could do it in conjunction with purees if you want her to still get them at day care or when you're out and about or whatever. It's very flexible.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

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