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Thread: supply questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    new jersey
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    9

    Default supply questions

    hello all! im new here and still very much researching so please help me or direct me if neccessary. im a fifth time mom and exclusively breadtfeeding for the first time ever with no formula...dont even have any in the house. with my other children i breastfed but because of lack of sipport hadto eventually give at least some formula. now i feel im way more mentally prepared and encouraged but dont ever want to have a low supply if i can help it.

    right now my newborn (two weeks old) is fine, and my supply is establishing so i have quite a bit of milk. i would like to have an abundant supply for pumping and saving as well. she eats quite a bit and is gaining, pooping and peeing very well i believe. what is the best way to maintain a supply for ebfing and storing some in the freezer? im afraid to pump after every feeding because ive noticed she sometimes wakes sooner than expected to nurse and one time i had pumped out all of what i thought was excess milk so had to soothe her until enough was made for another feeding. how can i go about doing this safely and keeping up a good supply? right now she weighs 9 lbs 4oz, up from 8lbs 9oz at birth.

    ive already done the lipase test for my milk...i froze a small amount for a week, then thawed it properly and tasted it. while it smells pretty bad to me, it still has a sweet taste. not as sweet as fresh milk, slightly different, but its definitely not bad tasting and it blends back together well, with no real change in consistency. am i good on that front? id prefer not to have to scald the milk at this time schedule wise as i dont have much time to do so with a very busy home.

    any advice, tips, corrections are welcome! thanks so much!

    ps...i see i posted this in the wrong forum! apologies...is there a way to move it to the proper forum?
    Last edited by @llli*meeskamooska; August 29th, 2013 at 10:33 AM.
    5th time's a charm! breastfeeding exclusively!

  2. #2
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    Aug 2013
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    new jersey
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    9

    Default Re: supply questions

    oh, forgot to add, she has about 7-10 poop diapers per day, with about 3-4 peepee diapers thrown in.
    5th time's a charm! breastfeeding exclusively!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    20,962

    Default Re: supply questions

    What is your goal with pumping? Do you need to establish a freezer stash for when you go back to work, or do you just want some milk in the fridge for the occasional bottle for a sitter? If you go back to work, when are you going and will it be full time?

    Sorry to answer your questions with more questions!
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  4. #4
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    Aug 2013
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    new jersey
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    Default Re: supply questions

    oh, thanks for the reply! im a sahm, but would love a stash to donate, as well as a bit for the occasional bottle for a sitter and dh to feed her. right now i feel as if id love to freeze as much excess milk as possible. its just so precious and for the first time ever i have an awesome supply that id love to keep up if possible. does that make sense?
    5th time's a charm! breastfeeding exclusively!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: supply questions

    Okay, in that case I think the best thing you can do is to put the pump aside for a while. Your baby is just 2 weeks old, and now is the time to focus on nursing, getting yourself and your baby comfortable with nursing without any added complications. The reason moms are advised to avoid the pump is twofold: first, pumping on top of nursing can result in milk oversupply, which can make nursing difficult for the baby and can increase your risk problems like plugged ducts and mastitis. Oversupply sounds great, especially if you have experienced undersupply, but believe me, it's best avoided! The second reason to avoid the pump for now is that as soon as you are producing bottles of milk, the temptation is there to use them, particularly when your baby wakes unexpectedly and you feel like there can't possibly be enough milk for her. And at this point, it is recommended that you do not introduce a bottle unless there is a medical need to do so.

    The only thing most moms need to do in order to maintain a great supply is to nurse on demand. Your body "reads" your baby's demand and uses that cue to figure out how much milk to make. For most moms, supply and demand will ultimately get match very closely, and at that point you won't feel full or engorged very often, if at all. So don't be shocked if one day you wake up and you don't feel full! Your baby can still get plenty of milk provided you give her the chance to nurse.

    The one thing to really be cautious with is birth control. A lot of docs will push contraception very hard at the 6 week postpartum checkup, and this is fine as long as they steer you towards a breastfeeding-friendly contraceptive. That means being very careful with hormonal contraception, particularly the combination estrogen-progestin contraceptives like the pill, patch, and vaginal ring. Even the progestin-only contraceptives should be used with care, since there is good anecdotal evidence that they can cause problems with supply in some women.

    So, put the pump aside for now. Focus on getting in sync with your baby and enjoying this time. In a couple more weeks, you can start adding in pump sessions. Start with one per day. Most moms choose to pump right after the baby's first morning feeding, since a lot of women feel like they have some extra milk around that time. If one pump session per day doesn't yield what you want, bump it up to 2, and so on.

    Lipase issues affect stored milk, and the longer your milk is stored, the worse the issues tend to get. If 24 hour-old milk tastes a little yucky, 48 hour-old milk is going to be worse, and 72 hour-old milk will taste even worse, etc. You might want to do a little more experimentation with your stash. See how the milk tastes after a few days in the fridge, and then after a few weeks, etc., and base your decision on that.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: supply questions

    ok thanks! im definitely not steering towards a bottle because theyve caused me lots of grief in the past. i will continue feeding her on demand. i will say shes grumpy once my flow slows down, and thats one of my main concerns also with my supply. i just always want to have enough. i guess i just cant relax too much because in my experience all three times with my other babies, i went from making enough milk to undersupply very quickly...and i didnt know what to do to get it back up. so i am nervous about it. i dont take any hormonal bc so thats no problem for me. i will just try to enjoy this time without too much worry. thanks again!
    5th time's a charm! breastfeeding exclusively!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: supply questions

    I totally understand your trepidation regarding supply. Let us know if you run into trouble- most nursing problems are solvable!
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: supply questions

    If you want to help avoid the grumpiness after letdown slows, try doing compressions. There are wonderful videos and info sheets on Dr. Jack Newman's site: http://www.breastfeedinginc.ca/conte...agename=videos

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: supply questions

    I would never pump during the day because I would be scared I'd pump everything that the baby would need to eat. So, I would pump all night long. He would only feed on one breast each time he woke so I would pump on the other breast. That way my breasts were always even and never having more or less on one side or the other. I would pump at 12 am, 2 am, 4 am, 6 am etc. It was tough but definitely worth it, I built up a huge supply for when I returned to work part time. Now that my baby is older, 10 months, I pump while at work and it's been working out fine. Goodluck!
    Also, drink MOTHERS MILK TEA AND TAKE FENUGREEK

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,424

    Default Re: supply questions

    giuseppesmom, you are a very dedicated mom. Your baby is so lucky to have you!

    But I would like to clarify a few things, because your experience is a bit unusual.

    1) in the majority of cases, nursing mothers need never pump until/if they experience separations from baby. As long as baby is allowed/encouraged to nurse as much and as long as baby wants, milk production is typically perfect.
    2) Pumping during the day will not 'take away' from milk baby needs. In the rare case a mother has low milk production, pumping throughout the day as well as nursing is one way to increase production.
    3) Babies typically need to nurse frequently night and day for several months. This is important both for baby and for breastfeeding normalcy.
    4) there is no need to have a huge stash of milk stored OR to induce overproduction prior to returning to work. How much exactly a mom wants to have stashed in the freezer will depend on her personality and her work situation, but it can be as little as enough for one days worth of milk, plus a small emergency cushion.
    5) Pumping 'extra' especially in the early weeks when milk production is being established will potentially lead to very serious overproduction, a health risk to mom and a cause of discomfort and/or unhappiness with nursing in some babies.
    6)Galactagogues like fenugreek etc. are for cases of low milk production and are not needed by all mothers.

    meeskamooska, I know many mothers who nursed their babies for a very long time. My best advice for a mom who wants to exclusively nurse until baby starts solids, and to continue to nurse baby for as long as mom and child want after, is to very simply, nurse and enjoy your precious baby. Avoid burdening yourself with pumping and bottles unnecessarily. These often get in the way of the natural rhythms of nursing. It sounds to me as if your baby is getting plenty of milk. I would be very surprised that when there is excellent weight gain if there is a ‘slowflow' issue. Baby may simply be done nursing for the moment, or need to burp, or to switch sides. A breastfed baby nurses a variety of ways-short feedings, long feedings, cluster feedings, fussy feedings, sleepy feedings-all normal. As long as an exclusively breastfed baby is gaining well and nursing is comfortable for mom, all is well.

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