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Thread: Extremely hard to feed

  1. #1

    Default Extremely hard to feed

    My daughter just turned 10 months old today. She doesn't care for purees and will eat a little bit of finger foods but not much. I've been exclusively pumping most of her life so she drinks breast milk. The thing is some days it's extremely hard to get milk in her. She will fuss likes she's starving so I sit down with a bottle to feed her and she will drink an ounce or two then push it away and I'll have to try again either when she fusses again or 10-15 mins after she's stopped. She slept all night last night so you would think she would be starving and ready to eat but it's been a struggle today as well. Anyone out there experienced this? This didn't just start it's been like this on send off for several months,

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    90

    Default Re: Extremely hard to feed

    At 10 months baby should be able to take milk other ways than bottle if she wants. Have you tried a sippy cup? Maybe letting her drink it herself "on the go" if she wants will help.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    22,538

    Default Re: Extremely hard to feed

    You could also try freezing her breastmilk and making slush that you spoon into her mouth, or put a breastmilk ice cube in one of those mesh feeders, or mixing breastmilk in with another food.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Extremely hard to feed

    She doesn't eat purees and hardly eats finger foods. Idk why she will not just drink her bottle at one sitting. Today has been another hard to get milk in her days. She will drink water from her sippy cup but not a lot so I don't want to put breast milk in it until she gets the hang of the cup.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    25

    Default Re: Extremely hard to feed

    Lol, I know what you mean as I too have one of those. Distractababy
    For months now.

    The only way I can feed him, breast, bottle or solids (he doesn't discriminate) is by distracting him.
    I get the bottle, him on my lap and toys and props all around. So I hold the bottle with one hand and use the other to pick up and hand him a toy or a box, hairbrush, whatever (the more unusual the shape the better), or pick it up when he drops or throws it.

    Breastfeeding was a little more tricky, but that isn't the topic here.

    Solids too. If he's eating something by himself there's not much I can do, and not much he will eat. He loses interest after a few minutes.
    But purees and cereals and such...plastic dishes, bowls, spoons, cups... pick it up when he throws it, put one in the other, pile them all up, bang one against another... anything to keep him entertained.

    And the amount (of anything) he will eat in a sitting depends on how interested he was in the toys and stuff.

    Also, breaking down the bottles (or any type of meal) into more smaller ones helps too.

    He was a big eater until his 6 month mark. Since then feeding him has been, and still is, a huge battle.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    7,653

    Default Re: Extremely hard to feed

    How is your child's weight gain and overall health?

    I have had three children, all with vastly different eating habits and appetites, and my research and experience has taught me a few things. One is, normal intake amount in breastmilk and/or solids varies tremendously child to child, two, most adults think babies and toddlers "need" more milk or solids than they actually do, and three, a healthy child who is given the opportunity will eat & drink what they need and lastly, turning meal times into a battle because your child is not eating the amount or the things you want your child to is counterproductive.

    There are a few medical or nutritional conditions that cause a child to have a poor appetite or to not be able to eat normally due to oral aversions or some other physical issue. If this is the situation, identifying and solving the underlying issue that is causing the child to not eat what they need is the only productive way to solve the problem. Barring those very rare circumstances, very young children tend to eat what they need, and resist eating more than they need, and the best way to handle it is to let up on the pressure and let your child eat what they want, as much as they want, when they want.

    An excellent book on this subject is My Child Won't Eat by pediatrician Carlos Gonzalez.
    Last edited by @llli*maddieb; August 9th, 2015 at 08:48 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    25

    Default Re: Extremely hard to feed

    I feel the last post is partly because of my comment (maybe I'm wrong), so I feel I should perhaps clarify a few things.

    My boy is 8 and a half months old, this eating pattern has been present since 6 months old and it took me a while to figure out how to feed him. He has no hunger cues whatsoever, not since after the typical newborn cues, so most of his life I've been offering often and gauging by his reaction whether he is hungry/will eat.
    You probably won't believe me, but it is how it is. He doesn't ask for food (once or twice in his life he made a motion towards my breast that showed he might want some,but that's it), nor does he cry when hungry or anything. More than a few times I would realize it's been hours since last ate anything, I'd just forget to offer and he'd be playing happily. Only when'd finally give him a bottle would I see how hungry he was by how voraciously he'd be drinking.

    And all the distractions...mind you, if he's hungry, he'll eat for a bit peacefully (bottle for example) - and by peacefully I mean his hands and feet moving, fidgeting, itching to move, be back in action, and after a few minutes he has no more patience and he's pushing toget up. Then I start with the toys. But when he's done, he's done and no amount of toys or coaxing can get him to eat more, whatever he's eating.

    And with solids too, I thought it might be the taste, but even if he mmmm's with delight at the taste, after a bite or two he starts fidgeting to get out of his highchair if there's nothing to play with. So I get the props and feed him by showing him the spoon, waiting for him to open mouth and lean in himself to take it, so I'm not force feeding him. And when he's done he's done. But without the distraction/entertainment he just won't eat, has no patience to sit still long enough to eat.

    And his bottle meals are 1-3 oz of milk from bottles, 3-4 times a day, one small meal of solids, the rest he gets by dreamfeeding.
    I can get a few short nursing sessions in mainly by singing, playing, positions that let him see the tv and a nursing bra I decorated with sewed in buttons and ribbons he could play with while nursing.

    Even while say drinking water frim his sippy cup (not the soft spout no spill kind,he doesn't care for those at all), I observe him, and when he wants more he will not reach for it (if it is right in front of him he will,but then it'll end up on the floor anyway), not cry, show he wants more, he'll just look at it. And when I take it and bring it closer to him he will open his mouth. That's it (and it took me a few tries to figure that one out).

    I have worried about his eating habits, tried this and that, forcing, letting him be, waiting for him to ask, everything... and this is the best I could do.
    Even thought he might be sick or something, but he is happy and alert.
    His weight gain had always been great,*but when this behavior started at 6 months he stopped gaining completely until I, by trial and error, figured out this system of feeding, now he is gaining again. I had posted on these forums about it even, when it started. And the dreamfeeding was probably what kept him from losing weight back then. (And to add, the dreamfeeding is done on demand, he will eat only when he wants to, in his sleep as well)

    Sorry for intruding on your thread op.
    Last edited by @llli*andreica; August 10th, 2015 at 02:35 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    7,653

    Default Re: Extremely hard to feed

    My post was directed toward op, and while I am sure there are exceptions, I strongly believe that what I posted is true the vast majority of the time, and I do believe that the book I suggested is helpful for parents who are trying to figure out if their child has a real eating problem or not. Your situation with a baby who never cues does not sound like the OPs situation, as the ops baby is fussing and cueing. I did not say that you or anyone else was forcefeeding a child, I did not say anything pro or con about dreamfeeding...you did use the word "battle" to describe mealtimes, so I did use the same word you did, one which of course is a common word for any scenario where parent wants one thing and the child another. For the record, while I would not agree your situation sounds much like the ops, so did not agree with all of your suggestions, I thought some of your tips such as smaller meals were good ideas.

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