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Thread: Low/slow and plateaued growth

  1. #1

    Default Low/slow and plateaued growth

    My daughter has always been small, she was born 6 lbs even and by her first pediatrician appointment she was down to 5#2oz. She's been exclusively breast fed her whole life, adding in solid food when she was 4 mo per her docs advice. She's now 18 mo and she only weighs 17#7oz and her height, weight and head circumference has all plateaued. We've seen a nutritionist through children's hospital who wants her to drink pediasure, take a daily multivitamin and breast feed less often. The problem is she doesn't like milk (I have never liked milk either) and pediasure tastes like flavored milk so she doesn't like it. I don't know what to do to get her to start gaining again. I'm worried because I was told as long as her head circumference didn't plateau she was still okay, but now it's stopped growing too. She's ahead of the curve in all her development other than growth though. She talks more than most 18 mos she's practicing jumping, she has no fear with climbing (she's been walking since she was 8 mo), she sings and dances all day long. She's just stopped growing...? Why would she just stop growing?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,368

    Default Re: Low/slow and plateaued growth

    Welcome to the forum!

    Breastfeeding less often, or even total weaning, is often recommended to moms in your situation, and I just don't understand why! First, breastmilk has plenty of calories, and second, it is something your child will eat. When there is a problem with growth, why would you want to remove one sure source of nutrition? Taking away breastmilk doesn't automatically cause a child to be a "good" eater or cause her to like foods that she didn't before.

    So I personally wouldn't stop nursing. I would just concentrate on feeding your LO lots and lots of high-calorie solids. Avocado. Beans. Meats. Whole-milk cheese and yogurt. Put some olive oil or butter in her low-calorie solids (fruits, veggies), and don't be afraid to offer her ice cream! A daily multivitamin is a good idea- it can't hurt and may help.

    Have you seen an endocrinologist? When a baby/toddler has slow growth, I think that should be your first or second stop after the pediatrician.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,925

    Default Re: Low/slow and plateaued growth

    I suggest, read the book My Child Won't Eat by Carlos Gonzalez, a pediatrician. Read the whole thing. It's cheap and pretty short and I think you will find it interesting.

    you also may want to visit the pediasure website. Their testing that shows weight gain using the product is only based on children 'at risk of malnutrition.'
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; July 2nd, 2013 at 10:10 AM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Low/slow and plateaued growth

    Thank you both so much! I will find that book and look into an endocrinologist. Oddly enough, she likes a wide variety of foods, even food that most toddlers wont touch, she just doesn't eat much at a time. She will only eat 5 bites each time she sits down to eat, no more, no less.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,368

    Default Re: Low/slow and plateaued growth

    Have you tried making a "nibble tray" available to her throughout the day? Things like cheese cubes, veggies and dip, tofu cubes, peanut butter crackers... Sometimes a kid who is too distracted to make it through an entire meal will snack on the fly, and take in a lot of calories that way.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    83

    Default Re: Low/slow and plateaued growth

    She is certainly a petite little thing, but looking at the growth chart, I still see steady growth. In addition to this, she has almost tripled her birth weight...it has taken all my kids 18 months to triple their birth weight. And to top it off, she is meeting her milestones and sounds like a very active little girl. This could even contribute to a slower weight gain. I would just continue to nurse and offer high calorie solids, as PPs have suggested. I add a little coconut oil to my 13 month old's solids to increase calories and fat. It seems to me there is a trend with breastfed babies being smaller, and I can't understand why so many doctors don't see this as well.
    ~Sarah

    Married to the love of my life, Jordan

    SAHM to Caleb (4/14/08) nursed for 19 months.
    Phoebe Grace (4/20/10), and 20 mths and counting!
    with #3, due May 2012

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