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Thread: Help! Lazy Eater

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,370

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    Has baby been checked carefully for a tongue tie? Crease that matches the crack sounds like a shallow latch issue. Did the LC show you the breast sandwich" technique? That can help you cram maximum breast into a tiny mouth.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,925

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    When a nurse at my oldest son's pediatrician's office told me to nurse my poorly latching, not gaining newborn every two hours, when it took 45 minutes just to get him latched, and another 45 to nurse him, plus 20 minutes pumping after every session because I was using a nipple shield, I did not know whether to strangle her or cry. (Crying won.)

    So I know exactly how unwelcome such a suggestion is. But later I realized, the nurse was right. She was not right to tell me to nurse every two hours, but the fact is my baby was not nursing often enough overall.

    So, please note, I did not suggest that you nurse baby every two hours. I know that that is a suggestion that denies reality. I suggested it might help to nurse overall more often IF your baby is not nursing about 12 times a day. That is why I talked about cluster nursing etc. There really is a difference between that and saying ‘nurse every two hours.’

    Going back to your op, you are having to pump and give a supplement –‘triple feed’ and it’s exhausting. So what I forgot to say before is that if your baby can nurse a little more, maybe that will allow you to not have to pump and supplement so much, so more time at the breast might equal less time with this other stuff that is exhausting you.

    This is just a suggestion, based on what is normal nursing frequency for a baby this age. No need to consider it if it is not a helpful idea for you.

    If your baby is unable to extract milk efficiently, that is a latch and/or a sucking issue. It may be anatomical. It may not. This is the type of thing you want experienced hands on help with if that is possible(?) Certainly we can provide latch suggestions (like mommal did above-we can offer more) and suggestions for keeping baby nursing more vigorously (switching sides or breast compressions, 'pumping' feet and hands, stroking baby- I used to jiggle my baby's chin to get him revved up again.)

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,925

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    The other thing baby does is that, while still latched, she pulls her head back and stretches the nipple like a rubber band. I try to stop her, but she does it o quickly that most times I can't stop her from doing this. I'm wondering if she is trying to get more milk when she does this because this is often the time she ones off the breast but is still rooting.
    this could be a kneading thing (trying to increase flow) Does she relatch, go to other side- or what happens then?
    Is it hurting (it sounds painful) Sometimes this kind of a pulling back thing us lessened by using a different nursing positition.

    Babies also do this when the back of thier head is touched sometimes.

  4. #14

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    Ladies, thanks for all of the suggestions. We hit another road block this week because I got very sick, spent a day in hospital, and had to be put on antibiotics....which are too strong to keep nursing. So for the next week and a half I'm pumping and dumping to keep up my supply.
    My nipples are enjoying the rest, which means that I definitely need help with our latch - I have an appointment to work with the LC as soon as the antibiotics are out of my system.
    I will get baby checked for being tongue tied.

    Thanks again for the help. It's been a very rough week but I'm not ready to give up yet. Hopefully this forced week break will renew our energy and we ll do better soon.

  5. #15

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    Yes, this really hurts. She will relatch, or go to the other side. I have a feeling it's her trying to get more, or faster milk. I work hard not to touch the back of her head as I know they have a reflex there.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,370

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    So sorry to hear that you're sick, mama!

    It's a good idea to contact Infant Risk (http://www.infantrisk.com/) about the antibiotics. It's common for moms to be told that they must pump and dump when the antibiotics are actually safe for nursing. Your case may be different, but you definitely want to check!

    Since you're on strong antibiotics, it's a really good idea to take proactive steps to prevent thrush. Be really careful about your breast hygeine. Wash your towels, bras, shirts, pajamas, etc. on hot, and every day. Pump parts should also be carefully washed and perhaps sterilized...? Reduce simple sugars in your diet and take a daily probiotic. If you sense a yeast infection starting anywhere on your body, make sure you get it treated.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    I had a very similar situation with my twins. At their 3 week appointment they were still below their birth weight, so the pediatrician had me start waking them every 90 minutes during the day and every 3 hours at night to eat. It was challenging. They had jaundice and were very sleepy. But it worked. After a few weeks they became very interesting in nursing and were able to gain weight. They would eat for hours in the beginning because they were so inefficient, but now at 15 weeks they only need to eat for about 15 minutes, so it has paid off. I'm really glad that we kept at it. And don't worry about supplementing. We supplemented during that time and they went on to be exclusively breastfed. So supplementing doesn't have to lead to weaning. If you have the chance and the energy once you recover from your illness, you might give this a try in addition to the other suggestions offered.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Help! Lazy Eater

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*jazzle76 View Post
    Without sounding ungrateful for your advice I'm at a loss as to how to feed her every two hours. She nurses for an hour or 1.5 hours. When would I sleep?
    Sorry, I missed this comment before adding my reply. When I was feeding mine every 90 minutes, I did nothing else. I ate while they were eating. I showered twice a week for five minutes each time and let my hair air-dry (heck, I'm still pretty much doing that now). I understand how overwhelming that feels. After feeding one baby, I would wake the other. By the time she was done eating, I basically had time to use the bathroom and get more water and a snack and then sat down to start over. I fit in more feeds during the day so I could take a few hours at night to sleep in between. We cosleep, so I was able to doze while they ate, which helped. This really only lasted a few weeks, and it was worth it for me because now feeding them is so easy. So if you choose this option, know that it's normal and you'll survive and even have fond memories of the days spent nursing in front of the television.

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