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Thread: The new study that did not make the news

  1. #1
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    Default The new study that did not make the news

    Here is an interesting study that did not make screaming yellow journalist headlines like the 'mothers rejoice in the streets, formula helps breastfeeding' one did.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...=Yahoo%21+Mail

  2. #2
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Thanks Meg, that's really interesting!

  3. #3

    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Not surprising, right? But interesting!

    The study showed that the exclusively breastfed group had the fastest growth in myelinated white matter of the three groups, with the increase in white matter volume becoming substantial by age 2. The group fed both breastmilk and formula had more growth than the exclusively formula-fed group, but less than the breastmilk-only group.
    One of the messages I think we should take from this -- in terms of supporting moms -- is that however much breastmilk a mom can provide for her baby is important. The more the better, but every drop is important. I often get the sense that a lot of moms still think it's either breastfeeding or formula, one or the other, and if they feel like they've failed at breastfeeding then they have to give up and just do formula.
    Karen
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Very good point Karen. I am really glad that the study and the article about it differentiated between babies who were fully breastfeeding, "combo feeding" and fully formula feeding. If a lot is good, why is a little not also good?

    I also have to say, I am starting to dislike the term "exclusive" when applied to breastfeeding. Maybe I am taking the Wiessinger-ian “watch your language" idea too far, but doesn’t "exclusive" imply some kind of private club that only a select few may join?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Hmm, that's an interesting point. What ideas do you have for "exclusive" alternatives?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Thanks for posting that article. Just last night DH was remarking on how smart LO is (haha, I know everyone thinks that about their own kid, but that's our parental right to kvell I suppose!). Today I sent him the article link and told him "clearly it's the breastmilk!" I especially pointed out the benefits of extended nursing, since he was a little surprised to learn recently that I'm not planning to wean soon.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Ha-ha, I just saw a commercial on TV where Gordon Ramsey spit something out when the woman said it had breastmilk in it. Clearly to get ratings! But maybe he should read this article. It may make him smarter! I don't watch his shows, but I'm going to go ahead and assume he could benefit from a brain boost.
    Mom to my sweet little "Pooper," born 10/12/11, and "Baby Brother," born 6/23/2014, and married to heavy metal husband. Working more than full-time, making healthy vegetarian meals for family, and trying to keep up with exercise routine.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*bfwmomof3 View Post
    Hmm, that's an interesting point. What ideas do you have for "exclusive" alternatives?
    Hmmm is right…I used "fully" above, but I am certainly not in love with that alternative.

    Maybe there really is not a quick sound bite term that works well. "Babies who consume only breastmilk" Or "Ideally, babies should consume only breastmilk" gets the point across but it's clunky. Plus it does not differentiate between babies who are nursed at the breast and those who are partly or totally fed expressed breastmilk. And that would certainly be an important differentiation in some research and for general clarity. "Babies who nurse at their mother's breast and receive no other foods or liquids" ? Nope. Now we are writing a novel just to describe normalcy.

    Maybe exclusive ain't so bad after all.

    Ha ha Gordan Ramsey.

    It would have made better TV if he thought whatever it was tasted delicious.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Great article! Thanks for sharing!

  10. #10
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    Default Re: The new study that did not make the news

    Great share

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