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Thread: Pumping Too Much?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    20,643

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    Oversupply "monsters" can be tough to tame. Often coping with oversupply is a process in which you take two steps forward and then one step back. I think that LLLMeg gave excellent advice about not going right to block feeding. Since you have been pumping so much milk, I think that you may need to occasionally use the pump to relieve discomfort. I'm not talking about emptying the breast, but rather about pumping (or better yet, hand expressing- it's supposedly less stimulating to supply) a couple oz to restore comfort.

    Lastly, please don't kick yourself over the pumpng you've done. It was done with the absolute best intentions, and we all applaud you for wanting to make so certain that breastfeeding would work out this time around!
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    East Syracuse, NY
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    12

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    Thank you --

    I thought the past two days were going so well and that I might actually be getting the hang of breastfeeding my little one. It definitely feels like I've taken two very large steps back.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    Yes you absolutely need to pump or hand express to comfort, maybe even enough to soften the breast. You want to avoid or take care of pluggs quickly! Maybe you will need to wean much more slowly from the pump rather than dropping pumping cold turkey.

    This is a process. It takes time to change milk production one way or the other! Please don't get discouraged.

    There are other, more drastic, things that can be done for overproduction. But I would strongly suggest seeing a IBCLC (Board Certified Lactation Consultant) without delay. Is that at all possible for you? Not only could they help you with other techniques for handling overproduction, I would also be happier if someone saw you and baby to make sure your baby is able to extract milk effectively- and improve on that if needed.

    Can you hand express? It takes some practice. Here is a tip sheet. http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...expression.pdf

    Don't worry about saving the milk if that is causing any concern. Hand express into a towel or whatever. Getting the milk out is more important right now.

    here is a website with an IBCLC look up function. http://www.ilca.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; April 1st, 2013 at 07:47 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    East Syracuse, NY
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    12

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    I will definitely work on weaning from the pump.

    I will contact my insurance company tomorrow to find out about coverage for a lactation consultant -- I'm not sure that if it is not covered at least partially that we would be able to afford that right now. If I can't, there are lactation specialists at the hospital that I can call and make an appointment with.

    I also was planning on attending a breastfeeding support group tomorrow, but unfortunately (just my luck), the meeting has been postponed until next week.

    Thank you again for your prompt and helpful responses.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Illinois
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    102

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    I am acutally going through the same thing right now with my LO. He is going on 7 weeks old and I was pumping for the first 6 because my nipples were bleeding the first week. We finally started the BF relationship and so far it is going well. Nipples are a little sore but we can deal (I am loving BFing). So anyway, I noticed that from all the pumping I also created a monster. I was pumping anywhere from 5-9 ounces every 3 hours and he does not consume anywere near that much so I am noticing fullness every time he is about to nurse. I have cut down my pumping to 3 times a day: Once in the morning to releave the fullness from the nighttime, Once midday, and once right before bed so that I do not wake up in the middle of the night so uncomfortable. So far this is working...I am hoping to cut down on the pumping gradually as my production starts to regulate with my LO demand. I let him nurse on one boob each session. He usually nurses every 2-3 hours. I hope it all works out for both of us
    Happy Mama of 4 beautiful boys ages 14, 10, 7 and the newest member of the family:
    Damian Gabriel 2/13/13 , , twice a day at work, and finally successfully. We never gave up and we are as happy as can be !!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    East Syracuse, NY
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    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    Alaina fell asleep at 10 this evening and woke up at 1AM. I was painfully engorged in both breasts. I had pumped a little after she ate because I was feeling so full before bed. I tried to feed her using the breast that felt less engorged which led to her screaming/crying. So, I laid her down so that I could pump some off and try to make it a little easier for both of us. I pumped about 4 oz in a matter of about 1 minute and stopped pumping because Alaina was crying to eat. I tried to nurse her again and she couldn't get any milk. She tried and tried and wasn't able to get anything which led to more screaming/crying. I frantically put what I pumped into a bottle for her, which she also was not a fan of, though she drank about 1.5 oz. After she took that, she started crying again, so I brought her into bed to try feeding her side-lying. She again tried nursing without success and ended up dozing off. I moved her to her bassinet so that I could go pump some more (still painfully engorged, especially on the left), but her little eyes popped open as soon as I laid her in her bassinet. She seemed a little more calm, so I laid her in her crib so that I could try to pump some more and possibly offer her the left side. I pumped some more, until my breasts were a little softer and then offered her the left side. She again couldn't get anything and dozed off quickly while trying. I had to change her diaper because she pooped while she was falling asleep. Of course, this woke her up. I sat her in her swing hoping she would fall asleep, but after a few minutes of that, she wanted to nurse again. So, I tried the left side again without success.

    I'm wondering if my supply could have decreased this quickly?
    Also, wondering if she is having such a hard time nursing because she is so used to the milk coming so easily/quickly and this time she had to work for it and that is what was causing the frustration for her?

    I feel like I'm back at square one. I'm going to call the lactation consultant first thing in the morning, but in the meantime, I'm not sure what to do for the next time she wakes up.


  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    East Syracuse, NY
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    12

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    At this point, I feel like I just need to switch to exclusively pumping. I've been struggling with the idea for a few weeks and with the way things went last night and this morning, I really just don't think I can do this anymore.
    I am extremely disappointed in myself, but I think that for my sanity I need to make the switch.

    My question now is how do I switch to pumping and how often/long should I pump for keeping in mind that I have an oversupply?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,643

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    Oh mama, I am so sorry about the rough night! But please don't give in to exclusive pumping just yet. Remember, your most effective weapons against a monster oversupply are TIME and PATIENCE, and you have only been at this for one day!

    When you're dealing with oversupply, fussing at the breast and breast refusal are par for the course. Babies who cope with a fast flow often end up with this Goldilocks approach to nursing: they hate it when the flow is too fast, and they also hate it when it's too slow. They want it just right. IMO, the best thing to do is to not try to make things too easy for the baby(for example, by pumping before she nurses or swapping in a bottle when she won't latch). The baby has to find a way to get her preferred flow speed- she has to learn to nurse efficiently when the breast is empty and control the flow when it's full. Personally, I'd LOVE to see you shelve the bottles completely for the next few days, and just power through the fussiness. I'm not brushing off how hard this could be, but I think it's a good step toward reaching the goal you set for yourself: to nurse this baby.

    If you decide you need to pump, then I strongly suggest keeping the baby a the breast for a few feeds per day, so that she remembers how to latch and stays willing to latch. That will give you time to decide whether or not EP really is the right decision for you.

    If you decide to simply make the switch to EP, then you need to balance your LO's milk needs against your supply. Try to stick to pumping the amount she eats every day, with perhaps a few oz extra tossed into storage. How many pumping sessions that will mean, and how long those sessions need to be- that's going to be something which you will need to tailor to your individual body.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    177

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    Don't give up yet!

    I agree it is very tempting to give in to pumping with oversupply (especially since you're an experianced pumper). Keep at it! It's terribly frustrating in the beginning. My LO never fussed at the breast but the spit up was out of control. I ended up with over 500 ounces in the freezer by 12 weeks but now at 5.5 months things are great. I'm happy I stuck with nursing, you just don't get that excited baby look with a bottle. I still freeze about 60 ounces a week but I'm happy to donate most of that extra milk.

    Definitely pump if you're super engourged or if you feel lumps. I've gotten plenty of plugged ducts and always have assertive to pump them or nurse them out immediately. I'm terrified of mastitis!

    If you decide to EP again, drop pumps to maintain enough supply but telling your body you don't need so much milk. By the time I went back to work (12 weeks) I could pump enough for the baby with only 4x a day.

    Whatever you decide, you are doing a great job! Good Luck!
    Trying to keep up with a busy 3.5 year old Morgan Alexis born 11/5/09 at 6 lbs 5 oz and proud retired 1 year EP'er!

    Nursing our new addition Jordan Catherine born 10/21/12 at 7 lbs 14 oz.

    Total donated milk so far - 1,368 ounces!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    East Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Pumping Too Much?

    Thank you ladies.

    I am torn now. I really feel like I want to continue to nurse, but I really feel like I am starting all over and it's just been one obstacle after another and I'm not sure how much more I can take.

    I just tried nursing her and she doesn't even seem like she's latching right at this point. She keeps going on and off the breast. I finally took her into bed and fed her side-lying and she did better.

    I feel completely overwhelmed and while EPing is not ideal, I look at my 4 year old and know that I pumped for her for a full year and she is doing wonderfully.

    I really am just at a loss.

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