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Thread: When is bfing not possible?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mommie of 2 View Post
    1. physical defect of the baby that makes it impossible for baby to latch on...like cleft palate etc. (however, in this situation you could pump now days).

    I gave birth to first dd in 1980 with a cleft lip palate all the way through the bone and into the nasal cavity. In those days there were no ultrasounds so her birth and CLP were a surprise to us. I did nurse and pump in the hospital but at that time the electric hospital pump was the size of a small refridgerator not something you took home with you. At home we had bicycle horn pumps that were worthless in this situation. She needed to feed 24/7 and barely took ten ounces in the early days and threw most of it up. Unfortunately my overly ample supply of milk went to waste. With today's modern pumps a mom can pump exclusively and supply the milk her baby needs but it would still be exhausting.

    .[/QUOTE]
    2. When mom has HIV or AIDS.[/QUOTE]


    I believe that WHO and UNICEF recommend nursing in this situation.

    .[/QUOTE]
    5. If mom chooses to use drugs or alcohol ...some docs suggest that smoking cigarettes is very harmful too, but I just read that in a breastfeeding book, I've not heard of a doc who actually told a mom not to breastfeed because she smoked...so I'm not sure about whether or not you should not breastfeed in that situation..[/QUOTE]


    In the case of smoking the recommendation would be to nurse while attempting to reduce smoking and to limit smoking outside of baby's environment. Baby would still get the benefits of breastfeeding.

    .[/QUOTE]
    6. This is just me thinking on this one, but I would think that in situations where mom has uncontrolled anorexia or bulimia a doc. would probably advise against breastfeeding due to mom being extremely underweight...the reason I suggest that one, is that it seems logical that breastfeeding might harm an extremely underweight woman who had issues with increasing her calorie intake enough to successfully breastfeed a baby..[/QUOTE]


    I think it is unlikely these women would sustain normal ovulation/menses and would be able to maintain a pregnancy in the first place but that is just my opinion.

    .[/QUOTE]
    7. Some moms don't produce enough milk when they're pregnant, or dry up entirely, so some moms might not be able to breastfeed baby #1...at least not for very long if baby #2 was on the way. Example...I have an aquaintance who got pregnant with #2 a month after #1 was born. However, lots of moms nurse quite successfully while they're pregnant, so this one is probably kind of unlikely.
    .[/QUOTE]

    In my experience but of course not always moms become pregnant once baby begins to sleep through the night and take in solids so are not as dependant on exclusive breastfeeding.

    Anne
    momuvseven

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    14

    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Very interesting. Thank u all for your reply.

    So for the moment i see it's only in extreme situations that bfing is not possible.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Actually in cases of HIV/AIDS there is a possibility that some breastfeeding is ok, but the virus is definitely passed on through breastmilk. According to UNICEF, exclusive bf'ing for the first 3 months can possibly help baby resist AIDS, but the longer an HIV+ woman bf's the higher the risk of passing the disease on to her child. In the early days, before we knew what we now know about AIDS, there was a highly publicized case of a woman who got AIDS from a blood transfusion after giving birth and then passed on the disease to her infant. Just thinking about this story still gets me so upset.

    For more info on HIV/AIDS and bf'ing, see this link

  4. #14
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Kesiah is beautiful!!!!!


    I think breastfeeding with AIDS/HIV depends on if a safe alternative is available. In the countries with the highest rates of infection there often is not a safe water supply and families would not have money to buy formula. In those cases breastfeeding is less risky than contaminated or no formula.

  5. #15
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    Jun 2006
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    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Quote Originally Posted by momuvseven View Post
    Kesiah is beautiful!!!!!
    Thank you!

    I think breastfeeding with AIDS/HIV depends on if a safe alternative is available. In the countries with the highest rates of infection there often is not a safe water supply and families would not have money to buy formula. In those cases breastfeeding is less risky than contaminated or no formula.
    You're probably right. Such a tragic situation, either way.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Actually regarding my #6, re: anorexia or bulimia, the reason I listed it is that I've known more than one lady who was pregnant and also anorexic or bulimic. One lady's baby did absolutely fine...she was the only one who had problems (physical and emotional)...and she did breastfeed and baby did fine. However, with the 2nd lady, she wouldn't allow herself to eat enough during her pregnancy to gain enough weight...the baby was born really really sick, and was in the hospital for a long time...the first time I saw the baby, it wasn't in the hospital, but around town, and even then, it had little tubes in its nose. In that situation, it wouldn't have been healthy for that baby to breastfeed since it's momma was sick too and couldn't eat enough to make a healthy baby in-utero much less increase her caloric intake enough beyond that amount to produce healthy breastmilk....her own fat stores were long since gone...and probably her stores of nutrients and calcium were depleted as well. Thankfully, mom and baby ended up fine in the long run.

  7. #17
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    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Mommieof2~ There are always exceptions but breastmilk/breastfeeding is the gold standard when it comes to infant feeding practices. Thank you for your input.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    2,178

    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Of course breastmilk is the gold standard. However, there are situations where the mommy needs to make sure she's healthy in order to care for baby.

    I only added anorexia/bulimia to the list of situations where breastfeeding might be impossible because in this situation, some women aren't physically and emotionally able to eat enough to keep themselves alive...much less nourish an infant. Some of these women might end up doing great harm to themselves and it seemed like a worthy item to add to the list.

    It doesn't seem like such an unlikely condition, considering that I've known 3 women who have one of these conditions...and 2 who became pregnant while dealing with it and I'm just a regular midwestern small town girl...its not like I live in LA.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    176

    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    My DS was small and jaundiced and would not nurse well (kept falling asleep) so I exclusively pump now (he's 7 months). Of course, before pumps, we would have done things differently. Maybe he would have begun to nurse well, or maybe not. There was a higher infant mortality rate then too. Also, don't forget that more women died in childbirth, so the babies would have to be fed another way. My LC said that many people used goat's milk before formula b/c the proteins are more similiar to breastmilk.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    1,437

    Default Re: When is bfing not possible?

    Hi All,

    Here's some info quoted from The Breastfeeding Answer Book, 3rd revised edition, on breastfeeding and eating disorders:

    "When a breastfeeding mother does not get the nourishment she needs, she runs the risk of using up her own nutritional stores to provide for her baby's nourishment, although her milk will still be best for her baby. Depleting her own reserves may lower her energy level and her resistance to illness. If she becomes chronically malnourished, the levels of vitamin A, D, B6, and B12 in her milk may be reduced (Subcommittee on Nutrition during Lactation, p. 140) and her milk supply may eventually decrease.

    A history of anorexia, bulimia, or other eating disorders does not preclude successful breastfeeding. In one case report, a woman who overcame anorexia and bulimia went on to regain normal weight, become pregnant, and was still breastfeeding her baby at five months (Bowles 1990). When 151 patients who were previously diagnosed and hospitalized with anorexia nervosa were contacted twelve years later, researchers found that the 50 women who had given birth had a rate of premature birth six times higher than the norm, buth the breastfed their children for the same mean time as did other women (Brinch 1988). However, some women with a history of eating disorders report a worsening of symptoms after birth (Weekly 1992). If a mother discloses that she has an eating disorder, suggest she seek nutritional guidance, as well as professional help in overcoming her eating problems."

    HTH,

    Tiana

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