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Thread: Losing milk supply

  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    19,889

    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*pixi View Post
    I know there are health benefits for him from breastfeeding, but as far as life with my baby goes I see pumping as the worst of both worlds. All the sterilising and bottle heating of formula feeding, with the diet restrictions and boob/nipple pain of breastfeeding (it feels like someone is stabbing me when he cries for food) and the extra inconvenience of the time of pumping and spending the time I'm holding/playing with my son feeling like I need to put him down to pump!!
    I totally get it, mama. Sometimes we have people coming through here posting things like "I don't really want to nurse the baby, can't I just pump?" and we always try to dissuade them for exactly the reasons you're talking about. EP is many times the work of nursing with few of the rewards!

    I wish we could tell you whether or not your baby will one day just get it and transition to nursing instead of bottle-feeding. I can say that there are babies who take longer than yours to figure it out.

    Whatever happens, I hope you know that your nursing experience is valid and valuable, and that we all really support you in your struggle.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    20

    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*djs.mom View Post
    Pixi of your baby CAN latch, and you ARE making enough milk why aren't we working at getting him back to breast NOW? If you make enough milk and aren't weaning off of supplements, getting the baby back to breast can really take a week or under. Any reason we can't start TODAY?
    There have been relatively few days (although I admit yesterday was one) where I've not tried something to get him to latch directly. Be that nipple shields, half a bottle feed then trying to get him to latch, trying when he's very hungry, trying when he's not very hungry, trying when he's screaming, trying when he's calm, trying different positions, trying different times of day.

    I'm happy to start now - I'm just at a loss if what to try!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*worknpump View Post
    Hi there! Congrats on your baby and all your hard work. I just wanted to chime in with a quick suggestion - have you tried "dreamfeeding" him? Just a thought. Many babies (including my DD so I say this from experience!) nurse better when they are very sleepy or asleep. Perhaps try picking him up from a nap (if it's been a while since he fed) and quickly putting him to the breast and see what happens. OR, right before a nap, feed him just a bit to settle him, then soothe him to sleep, then put him to the breast and see what happens. If he has the ability to latch and nurse, perhaps it's just a matter of changing the environment/conditions under which he nurses. Maybe try nursing in a very dark room with some white noise?

    Just some thoughts. I wish you the best.
    I've not tried either of these for a while. Perhaps it's time to try them again

  4. #34

    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Thanks pixi. I know sometimes it is even hard to voice what we would really want, when we are afreaid we won't get it...OK so here are the ideas I was thinking about today. -
    1) nursing vacation. Mom, baby, bed or couch, movie or book. 2 hours at a time or two days-however much time you can give, and of course you can do this as much as you like/can. Get help with your other responsibilities so you can do this!

    Lie down with baby close to you-next to you (sidelying) or on top of you (laid back) skin to skin or clothed, just make sure breasts have easy access so you can get baby on there the second he roots. play, relax, enjoy baby, take a nap. If baby falls asleep, keep holding baby. look for rooting signals or cues in sleep and keep baby near your breast. Any attempt to latch or interest in the breast is a step in the right direction. Don't get discouraged, celebrate each victory no matter how tiny!

    While doing this, keep a syringe or eyedropper or something nearby so you can help entice baby to the breast with a few drops of breast milk or formula dribbled on your nipple. *hand expressing a drop will do this as well.* If baby gets frantic and needs to eat but wonlt latch, give baby some expressed milk or formula however you usually do, but not a full feeding, trying again to encourage baby to the breast after baby is calm again.

    If any part of what you are doing is stressing you or baby out, take a break from that particular thing. If the entire situation is getting you frustrated, take a break and go pump or do something else entirely. On the other hand, a little fussiness is normal and not stressing. My daughter practically hyperventalates when I bring her to the breast sometimes. For her this is an anticipatory reaction, but to other's it sounds like she is hating what I am doing! In other words don't mistake a baby's momentary frustration or excitement or fussiness for rejection-keep trying a bit.

    If you get sick of the bed, take a bath with baby. Take a walk with baby close to you in a front carrier like a sling or wrap. Try anything else you can think of. If baby roots, stop wherever you are and offer your breast! Don't wait for anything when baby shows interest. Don’t miss the moment. If you do, it's ok-there will be another time to try. But try not to!

    Don't think about making baby latch. You cannot. But you can make the opportunities that are conducive to encouraging nursing by being in close physical contact. Don’t take fussing as a sign baby is rejecting you or fears nursing. At this point some nipple confusion may have come into play, but there is no way your baby ‘prefers’ something else to your warm breast. His instincts to nurse are still there, maybe slightly buried. It’s a matter of gently, gently leading them to the surface again.

    2) Is baby’s reluctance to latch physical after all? You could explore alternative therapies-chiropractic, cranial sacral, Bowen. I know nothing about these techniques, they are not ‘official’ recommendation of LLL. But I do know Lactation Consultants and moms who swear they can make all the difference in certain situations.
    3) Nipple shield? Ever suggested, or tried?

    Further info

    Feeding cues http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...eding_cues.pdf

    Tips on latch and positioning http://www.llli.org/faq/positioning.html

    Laid back position http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfeeding.pdf

    laid back video –also has nice cueing demo http://www.biologicalnurturing.com/video/bn3clip.html

    Here are two simple pictorials, one on latch, one on tongue tie http://cwgenna.com/quickhelp.html

    latch and 'Breast sandwich' article http://www.llli.org/llleaderweb/lv/lvfebmar04p3.html

    What is normal in the early weeks with a breastfed baby http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing/


    Again -Help-my baby won’t nurse! http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/back-to-breast/

    Nipple shields- http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/child/wean-shield/

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    504

    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*pixi View Post
    I've not tried either of these for a while. Perhaps it's time to try them again
    Worth a shot. My DD got really fussy about nursing around 10 weeks and would ONLY nurse while sleeping. At 12 weeks I went back to work so she gets bottles of pumped milk during the day, but I was able to dreamfeed her for naps, right before I went to bed and early in the morning for many months. She's almost 11 months now and even though it seemed weird at the time (to have to put her to sleep and THEN feed her!), that was just the way it was/is for us! It seems that when some babies are asleep nursing is more instinctual, without all that other incoming sensory stimulation that occurs when they are awake.
    Last edited by @llli*worknpump; February 22nd, 2013 at 08:48 AM. Reason: type
    Blessed with DS - born 9/2/09 - nursed/pumped for 12 months
    Blessed with DD - born 3/27/12 my dreamfeeder

    903 ounces donated.
    http://www.wakemed.org/landing.cfm?id=135

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    504

    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Pixi - how are things going??
    Blessed with DS - born 9/2/09 - nursed/pumped for 12 months
    Blessed with DD - born 3/27/12 my dreamfeeder

    903 ounces donated.
    http://www.wakemed.org/landing.cfm?id=135

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Not good.

    I've tried as much as I can, and whilst I can now get him to latch (kind of), but I don't think that he's drinking much.

    For example, this morning. He nursed for an hour and was still fussing for food so I thought I'd top him up from a bottle and he drank the same amount he'd usually take for a whole feed.

    He's demanding food 2 hourly which is making it nigh-on impossible to find time to express when I'm home alone.

    We're off to the hospital for the tongue tie tomorrow. I'm hoping its a miracle cure because I really can't do this much longer. The breast pain is driving me mad. The pump is shredding my nipples and I'm absolutely knackered from the pumping on top of the regular having a newborn lack of sleep.

  8. #38
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    May 2006
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    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Aw, mama! So sorry to hear that you haven't yet hit the magic turnaround point...

    It's amazing that you got your LO to latch on. That's huge, and it points to incredible patience and persistence on your part. Once the tongue-tie has been released, I hope that his efficiency at the breast will improve. FWIW, most babies will take a large feed from a bottle even after a perfectly adequate feed at the breast, due to the mechanics of bottle-feeding- a baby has to swallow when he sucks on a bottle, or he's going to choke. I once fed my 3 week old baby 5 oz from a bottle after she nursed (getting perhaps an oz)- and I really only realized that I had overfed her when she puked up almost the entire bottle.

    The pump absolutely should not be "shredding" your nipples. That really points to some sort of issue with suction (too high?) or flange size (too small/too large). Trying a different size of shield/flange may help.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  9. #39
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    Feb 2013
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    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    hi..
    i have friend. she is also a mom.
    she keep on asking me why she doesn't have breast milk..since the day she gave birth.. does it really happen?

  10. #40
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    May 2006
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    Default Re: Losing milk supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*yanie24 View Post
    hi..
    i have friend. she is also a mom.
    she keep on asking me why she doesn't have breast milk..since the day she gave birth.. does it really happen?
    Most cases of insufficient milk production can be traced to problems in breastfeeding management. Not nursing the baby enough, rigid schedules, unnecessary supplementation with formula, early bottle introduction, overuse of pacifiers, innappropriate use of hormonal contraception, etc. In a very much smaller number of cases, problems with supply can be explained by health issues, including hormonal problems (thyroid dysfunction, polycystic ovarian syndrome), retained placenta fragments, or damage to the breast due to previous injury or surgery. The rarest cause of insufficient milk supply is breast hypoplasia, in which a woman's breasts fail to develop normally. Hypoplastic breasts are typically widely-spaced (hands-width or more), tube-shaped, and may be very different in size.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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