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Thread: Shallow latch at 11 weeks and not having enough wet diapers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Rural Saskatchewan, Canada
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    Default Shallow latch at 11 weeks and not having enough wet diapers

    Our latch was great until about three weeks ago. Now he's not opening wide when we latch on. I'm trying to retrain him to latch on by following good latching practices and by breaking the latch and starting over when it's a poor latch. I avoid waiting until he's really hungry so that he doesn't get too frustrated if he doesn't get to latch right away. The problem is that he only had five heavy diapers yesterday, and I'm getting concerned that he's not getting enough to eat because of the shallow latch. Also, because I'm "retraining" him, he sometimes just falls asleep instead of eating, as though he's bored. He's not starving, but he's not gaining weight very well anymore. I'm looking for some advice on how to solve this problem. Anyone been through something similar?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Shallow latch at 11 weeks and not having enough wet diap

    Is the latch bothering you? Causing pain or nipple soreness or anything? What makes you feel like it's not a good latch?

    Five heavy diapers is plenty. 5-6 means baby is drinking enough and as they get older you tend to get less # and wetter diapers because they start holding it longer.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Rural Saskatchewan, Canada
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    Default Re: Shallow latch at 11 weeks and not having enough wet diap

    This was helpful! I felt better right away hearing that's enough wet diapers. My concerns about the latch are a result of my nipple being pinched after every feed and his not opening his mouth enough. Sometimes I have a pinching pain while he's sucking too. We were doing better for awhile, and now it's happened again, lol. Back to work! Not sure why this keeps happening I'm rural, so I'm trying to fix it on my own without driving into the city to see a LC.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: Shallow latch at 11 weeks and not having enough wet diap

    Do you have a high supply or a fast letdown? Sometimes a baby will learn to compress the nipple in order to slow a rapid milk flow- my LC compared it to crimping a hose in order to control the flow of water.

    Some symptoms of high supply/fast letdowns:
    - mom frequently feels full or engorged
    - mom leaks a lot
    - mom has a strong letdown sensation, may experience multiple letdowns in a feeding
    - mom is able to pump multiple oz of milk with ease (if pumping)
    - baby may cough, gag, splutter, or make a "click" or "cluck" noise while nursing
    - baby may fuss at the breast or pull off during nursing
    - if baby pulls off the breast while nursing, mom may observe milk streaming or squirting from the breast
    - baby may feed rapidly, in as little as 5-10 minutes
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5

    Default Re: Shallow latch at 11 weeks and not having enough wet diap

    This is very helpful. We have a lot of these symptoms. So, do you suggest I pump before I feed? Often when I pump I get 5 ozs from each side. Should I pump more often so that when I pump I'm getting more like 2-3 ozs?


    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    Do you have a high supply or a fast letdown? Sometimes a baby will learn to compress the nipple in order to slow a rapid milk flow- my LC compared it to crimping a hose in order to control the flow of water.

    Some symptoms of high supply/fast letdowns:
    - mom frequently feels full or engorged
    - mom leaks a lot
    - mom has a strong letdown sensation, may experience multiple letdowns in a feeding
    - mom is able to pump multiple oz of milk with ease (if pumping)
    - baby may cough, gag, splutter, or make a "click" or "cluck" noise while nursing
    - baby may fuss at the breast or pull off during nursing
    - if baby pulls off the breast while nursing, mom may observe milk streaming or squirting from the breast
    - baby may feed rapidly, in as little as 5-10 minutes

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Shallow latch at 11 weeks and not having enough wet diap

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*cholthe22 View Post
    This is very helpful. We have a lot of these symptoms. So, do you suggest I pump before I feed? Often when I pump I get 5 ozs from each side. Should I pump more often so that when I pump I'm getting more like 2-3 ozs?
    No, if you have symptoms of oversupply and fast letdowns you want to avoid the pump as much as possible. Every time you remove milk from the breast, that tells your body to make the same amount all over again. And every time you thoroughly empty the breast, your body gets the message to make the same amount again, plus a little more. So pumping in addition to nursing is a good way to perpetuate or worsen oversupply.

    If oversupply and fast letdowns are making nursing difficult for the baby, the place to start is with reclined nursing positions. Try leaning back in a chair, or even lying on your back with baby tummy to tummy with you. The more reclined you are, the more gravity will work against the letdown, resulting in a more comfortable experience for the baby.

    You also want to feed on demand, allowing the baby to nurse at his own pace. That means that you offer the first breast and allow baby to nurse on it for as long as he wants, offering the second breast after he comes off the first on his own, and not stressing if baby doesn't take the second side. If the baby nurses frequently, that's a good thing- removing small amounts of milk on a frequent basis prevents the fullness from getting really bad and causing super-fast, super-intense letdowns. So if your baby happens to be one of those rare babies who prefers to nurse every 3 hours rather than every 1-2, you might want to try offering the breast a little more frequently and see if that helps.

    Finally, if you do all of the above but you are still having trouble with rapid letdowns, it may be necessary to progress to something called block feeding, which is feeding on one breast at a time for as many as several feedings (i.e. blocks of time) in a row. Block feeding allows milk to build up in the unused breast, and that buildup signals the body to decrease supply. But don't start with block feeding- often it's possible to deal with oversupply/fast letdowns using the less dramatic positioning and demand feeding measures, and block feeding can cause supply to reduce to a level that is too low, so you want to use it with caution.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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