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Thread: Not enough supply for direct nursing and pumping

  1. #1

    Default Not enough supply for direct nursing and pumping

    I have my DD on 22 dec. She is 20 days now. Since she was born, i have give her breastmilk but the supply just seems never enough for her. I almost never leave my chair on where i breastfeed her. I end up give her formula for couple of bottles a day (90ml/drink). It actually hard for me to give her formula since i tried really hard to give her only breastmilk. I also have a DS (2,4 yo) and i really hope to play with him as much as i can but with the non stop nursing with the dd, it seems impossible. I wonder if anyone can tell me what to do to increase milk supply. I really really wish to be able to direct nursing my dd and still have good supply to pump so my husband or anyone can bottle-fed my dd with the expressed breastmilk while i accompany my ds. Right now, it is impossible to do because for direct nursing itself i dont produce enough let alone pump it and have good storage. Please help. Thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,955

    Default Re: Not enough supply for direct nursing and pumping

    Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new baby! I think the most important thing to recognize is that with a 20 day old baby, nursing is pretty much the only thing you should be doing. If you ask most of the moms on this forum what they were doing when their babies were 20 days old, they'd all say the same thing: they were sitting on the couch or lying in bed, nursing the baby all day long. Nothing builds milk supply better than frequent nursing- and that's why newborn babies nurse all the time. At 20 days, a lot of new babies are going into their first major growth spurt, which usually happens at around 3 weeks, and which can result in almost non-stop nursing until your supply is boosted to where baby needs it to be.

    I know it can be really hard to go from being able to give your first child your undivided attention to needing to put your newborn first, giving your older child only the little bit of attention you have left over. But this is temporary, and eventually you'll be able to mother both kids more easily.

    Do you have a sling? If you can master nursing in a sling, you'll be able to move around the house and take care of some of your older child's needs while continuing to nurse the baby.

    I strongly encourage you to put the bottles and formula away. Supplementing with formula has a negative impact on your milk supply. Every time you supplement instead of nursing, your body gets the message that it doesn't need to make so much milk. And babies who get a lot of bottles from early on become lazy and reluctant breastfeeders. And 3 weeks is very early to be giving bottles. Most resources suggest delaying bottle introduction until 4-6 weeks or longer if breastfeeding is not going well.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3

    Default Re: Not enough supply for direct nursing and pumping

    Thanks for your advice. But i wonder what to do if my breast has become very soft as if there's no more milk and the baby still want to nursed? I tried to keep nursing, but she became angry and cry because cant get the milk. I became frustrated with this condition.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,955

    Default Re: Not enough supply for direct nursing and pumping

    Just because your breasts feel soft, it doesn't mean that they are empty. Milk is always being made, and the emptier the breast gets the faster milk is made to replace what is being taken out. The key to increasing supply is to remove as much milk as possible as often as possible.

    Many moms find that their supply dips a bit towards the end of the day. And this can be frustrating for a baby, particularly since but the end of the day both mom and baby are stressed and tired and needing sleep. The best thing to do is to just nurse, nurse, and nurse some more. The baby will be ale to get a meal if she's hungry- she'll just take a bunch of very small feedings instead of one larger feeding.

    Something which often kicks in at around 3 weeks is evening fussiness. This is a good article about it: http://kellymom.com/parenting/parent...fussy-evening/
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,419

    Default Re: Not enough supply for direct nursing and pumping

    Assuming your baby can latch and nurse effectively, the best way to increase milk supply is to nurse frequently. That is why a baby will nurse very frequently in these early weeks-in order to induce an appropriate amount of milk production. If baby is not able to nurse frequently, or baby is given supplements unnecessarily, that will typically harm milk production over time.

    I am confused why you are supplementing. Some mothers prefer to combo feed and that is fine if that is your choice, (but it is important to know that this will impact milk production and most likely lead to a shortened time of being able to breastfeed.) But if your preference is to exclusively nurse, or at least, provide your own milk exclusively, what is going on that makes you think there is not enough milk? Were you told by a doctor to supplement? Is your baby not gaining well? A baby's behavior alone does not indicate the need for supplemental feedings.

    'Non stop' nursing is normal for this age. A baby this young normally nurses at least 12 times a day. More often is normal and fine. And mothers routinely breastfeed despite having 1, 2, 3, 4 and more older children to care for and play with or drive all over town for school and activities (ugh that's mine.)
    The early days with a newborn are extremely intense and time consuming no matter how a child is fed. But assuming latch is ok, there is no reason to be stuck in a chair to nurse. Even without a sling mothers will nurse while standing and walking, sitting on the floor, lying down, etc.

    If supplemental feedings are not needed, then pumping and bottles is not recommended until breastfeeding/milk production is well established, after about 6 weeks or so. Any unneeded pumping and bottle feeding at any time can have a negative impact, however, if you wait a bit longer to introduce that, that is usually better from a breastfeeding duration standpoint.
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; January 12th, 2013 at 01:03 AM.

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