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Thread: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

  1. #1

    Default Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    My girl will be 9 months next week. I am a full time working and breastfeeding mom, but she is demanding more pumped breastmilk than what I can provide the babysitter. So, we tried to use frozen milk that I have stored, and/or formula. Problem? She rejects both. We've tried different times of day, brands of formula, etc. I think the problem with the thawed milk is the taste--it smells soapy and/or rancid. The formula also smells very different. She has never had a problem taking fresh pumped breastmilk from the bottle. Any tips?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    The frozen milk sounds like it may have a lipase issue: http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/m...expressedmilk/
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    Thank you, I appreciate the input and find this article very interesting. I'll try scalding first and see if that helps.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    How may hours are you away? How much milk/formula is she taking while she's with the babysitter? And how much are you pumping each day?
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  5. #5

    Default Re: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    I'm away from 7am to 4:30pm daily. I pump anywhere between 9 and 12 oz a day and put it in the frig when I get home for the babysitter to use the next day. This is the only milk she'll drink and it's not enough because for the past month, insted of two bottles, she's been having three (of 4-5 oz) with the sitter. Also, I nurse her at 6:30 am right before I leave.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    That seems like a lot of milk for her to be drinking. The general rule is 1-1.5 ounces per hour you're gone and you're at the top end of that and slightly overshooting. You may be able to reduce it to a more manageable level and avoid dealing with trying to get her to take formula (lots of kids won't if they're used to the taste of breast milk). With scalding, future frozen milk would be okay, but if she won't take the milk you have frozen now that doesn't really solve your current problem.

    Is she eating solid foods regularly?
    How frequently would you say she nurses when you are together?
    Does she nurse at night?

    I'm thinking you might have your sitter try offering a solids meal before offering the bottle for at least one feeding during the day- maybe midday. Then offer the bottle, but a smaller one. Maybe 3-4 ounces. You don't want to replace the mikl feeding with solids, since the majority of her nutrition needs to be coming from either breast milk or formula, but you could use it as a tool to help you get back down to a more manageable milk intake.

    And breaking your bottles up into smaller increments might help even without the solids. Lots of times the baby will finish an entire bottle whether they want all of it or not. They just keep swallowing until the flow stops. For a baby that age 3-4 ounces per feeding should be plenty, with maybe an occasional 1-2 ounce top off if they are having a growth spurt or something.

    The other alternative would be to try and fit in another pumping session at some point. Maybe in the evening after baby goes to bed or if she only nurses from one side you could pump the other. Just fit it in wherever you can to get enough ounces to make up the difference.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  7. #7

    Default Re: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    Thank you for the reply. This makes me feel better. She's always been a fussy eater, and in the 5th percentile for weight, so I always think she needs to eat more and drink more milk for calories. I guess she'll survive on 9 oz of milk during the work day and I need to stop worrying that she is not getting enough (It just ties me to her at all times outside of work, which has been getting very exhausting since she's a fussy eater even at the breast).

    I also wondered, though, whether she has started to wake again at night to nurse (1-2xs) because she's not getting enough to eat during the day. She eats solids, but only about one oz at a time- 3 times a day. According to the Pediatrician's Guide she should be getting much more than this. I try to pump before bed, but she usually eats so much her last nursing session of the day that I'm left empty and only get 1/2-1 oz.

    Great tips! Thank you!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Rejecting thawed breastmilk and formula. Help!

    She should be getting somewhere between 9-13.5 ounces if you are gone 9 hours. And if she's on the small side you are right to stay on top of making sure she's getting enough. Definitely try the tips and see if they help as far as less milk intake during the day, but again you are right that she will be making it up when you are together. Also keep in mind 8-9 months is a time that many mothers experience a drop in pumping output. Adding in pumping sessions and making sure you're nursing on demand when you are with her can help with that.

    Night nursing at this age is totally normal. My daughter nursed frequently at night and I think that is what helped me keep my supply up (I didn't respond well to the pump and was never able to pump enough). She was also small so I didn't mind nursing at night because it made me feel better about making sure she was getting enough. She could also be teething or hitting a developmental milestone (like walking or something), both of which can cause an increase in night wakings.

    Solids intake varies so much at this age. IMO the right amount of solids for a breastfed baby to be eating is however much the baby wants to be eating. Since solids are mostly for fun and experience and not nutritional intake until they are one, the amount doesn't really matter. Does she do any finger foods or snacks? Again, that kind of thing could help with spreading out bottle feedings.

    Here's a link to some info about baby-led solids, in case you're interested. A lot of moms find it is more compatible with continued breastfeeding than the traditional spoon-fed purees. And some babies just eat better when it's not coming on a spoon.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

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