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Thread: Bottle Problems

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    94

    Default Bottle Problems

    It seems as though history is repeating itself. With my first son, at around two months, he began refusing a bottle. This seems to be happening again with my son who was born about two months ago. He's not refusing as much as he seems not to know what to do with a bottle. When I offer him one containing freshly expressed milk, he really just gnaws on the nipple, getting maybe 1/2 ounce in a 1/2 hour. My older son did this exact same thing.

    A little about myself: I have an oversupply (had with my first as well) that my DS is able to handle. In fact, he came home from the hospital at 7 lbs. 4 oz and today weighs about 14 lbs and has gained 3 inches. I also have an overactive letdown. My little man generally nurses for 5-10 minutes on one side every 1 1/2 to 2 hours during the day and every 3-4 hours at night.

    I'm looking for suggestions on how to help him with the bottle. I'm committed to pumping and offering every day, but I'm wondering if that will be enough. With my first son, he never took a bottle again, which wasn't a big deal, but I felt a little restricted in what I could do, and I really don't want to repeat that.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,912

    Default Re: Bottle Problems

    So bottles would be for occasional separations? Not for every day?

    What about cup feedings (small open cup-like thew size of a shot glass works well.) It's a learned skill but many do it, there is an online video I can suggest. My husband did it when I went to get my hair cut and left him with expressed milk but not a bottle in the house when our daughter was 2 months old. Also sippy's are used with success by many, usually for slightly older babies but??? It depends on the patience and care of whoever is giving baby your expressed milk.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,360

    Default Re: Bottle Problems

    with LLLMeg.

    Sometimes when a mom says she feels restricted by not being able to leave the baby, part of the restriction stems from the fact that she is uncomfortable nursing in public. Is that an issue for you?
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    94

    Default Re: Bottle Problems

    Thanks for the replies. The bottle would only be for occasional separations, not a daily thing. I am uncomfortable nursing in public. This is something I was hoping to overcome, but I'm just not there yet. Since I have a two-year-old as well, I can't "nurse in hiding" like I did the first time around. With my first, I could go out to the car any time we were out to nurse, but I can't do that this time unless my DH is with us.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,912

    Default Re: Bottle Problems

    oh ok, so you would be giving baby the bottle and you would be out of the house. Well, I guess you could still do my suggestions-but I bet you would get more stares feeding your two month old with an open cup than you would nursing! (Especially if you did use a shot glass-ha ha. Sorry, I am picturing freaking people out feeding my baby with a shot glass at the mall.)

    OK, another idea would be, to try paced bottle feeding. This is actually the recommended way to give a breastfed baby a bottle in all circumstances-actually, it is a good way to give formula fed babies bottles as well, but that is another topic.

    But I am thinking, how it may help in your situation is it attempts to mimic breastfeeding by giving baby more control of the flow. Even a baby who is used to a fast flow 'knows' they can 'adjust' flow with what they do on the breast. Typical bottle feeding positions do not allow baby to control anything, resulting in a baby who must drink or drown. That may be part of what your baby objects to with the bottle.

    paced bottle feeding- http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf If you have the latest The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding, there are some drawings as well.

    And if you ever would like ideas for NIP with a toddler in tow, I am sure lots of moms have suggestions. I know how awkward NIP can feel, especially with a fast letdown! But the convenience just cannot be beat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,360

    Default Re: Bottle Problems

    Feeding baby with a shot glass... How about a whiskey bottle in a brown paper bag?

    Is there anything in particular that makes you uncomfortable about NIP? Feeling like you're exposing too much skin? Worries about what someone might say? The reason I ask is that there are strategies for dealing with those issues.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: Bottle Problems

    The whiskey bottle in a brown bag would probably work better than a regular bottle for my little guy.

    The bottle would serve two purposes for me: going out in public and leaving him with a babysitter for a few hours. So, the shot glass would work for the latter. When I offer my little guy a bottle, he'll take it into his mouth willingly where he'll proceed to chew on the nipple. He doesn't even attempt to suck (even if he is hungry). He'll chew on it as long as I let him, getting maybe 1/2 ounce in a 1/2 hour. I'm considering trying a fast-flow nipple because I think his problem is the bottle nipple is too slow--is that possible? Just throwing out an idea.

    As far as nursing in public, I do have a cover that I use at home when I have company. I think what worries me about nursing in public is the attention it draws. People inevitably stare at the woman nursing her baby because it's not all that common, and I don't really like to be in that situation. He's also sort of difficult to nurse because he pops on and off a lot (I'm assuming in dealing with the fast flow), so when I nurse him, it takes a lot of attention and work on my part to keep relatching him.

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