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Thread: Pumping in hospital?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    292

    Default Pumping in hospital?

    I'm a BTDT mom of a 4 year old and had great success BFing. I'm pregnant again and due in march. I was flipping through some "advice" for BFing in a magazine and someone suggested bringing your pump to the hospital to pump when you're not nursing to help get supply going. I have never heard of anyone doing this, nor had it ever occurred to me to do this. Has anyone done this? Would it really help or wouldn't it be better to get your LO to stimulate milk production based on his needs? Just curious on your thoughts on this, I want to make sure LO#2 has as much success as #1 did.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,271

    Default Re: Pumping in hospital?

    Terrible advice. Simply terrible.

    All you need to do to get supply going is to nurse on demand. As long as nursing is going well, you're not supplementing with formula, and baby isn't excessively sleepy or separated from mom for more than a small amount of time, then the baby will bring your supply in the normal amount of time (2-5 days postpartum). Pumping in addition to on-demand nursing is likely to provoke an oversupply of milk, and the last thing you want when you're trying to nurse a newborn is a huge oversupply problem!
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,293

    Default Re: Pumping in hospital?

    Great advice from mommal

    Wishing you well with your new lo. Do you have the new edition of the womanly art of breatfeeding? I really enjoyed it with my second.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Re: Pumping in hospital?

    Thanks for alerting the us to this ridiculous but growing ever more ubiquitous suggestion. Just as formula is, for the breastfed baby, a medical intervention and should only be given if absolutely medically needed, breast pumps are medical devices that should only be used if needed. They are completely unnecessary for milk production if all is going generally normally, even when everything is not perfect. And if a mom really needed to pump in the hospital, she would best use a hospital grade rented pump anyway, not a personal use pump she would bring from home. When did pumps become the thing no expecting mom can be without?

    How many moms have bought pumps unnecessarily or long before they needed them for work, due to this terrible advice? How many moms are frustrated and exhausted by "breastfeeding" because they think pumping on top of nursing is something they have to do in order to ‘have enough”? How many moms have struggled with overproduction because they have pumped unnecessarily and told their body to make enough milk for triplets?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Pumping in hospital?

    I'm really glad I just checked these forums!!! I'm expecting our second child in a few weeks and I'd just seen - as in earlier this evening - a breast pump listed among the things to take to the hospital. I thought that didn't sound right, but I figured it's been two years since I had DS and maybe it was a new study that was proven to be benificial or something
    I'm Rebecca; the local fish out of water in small town Alabama
    DS Duglen born Jan 2011 & breastfed for 16 months - never tasted formula
    DD Debra born Dec 2012; my NATURAL girl & boob lover

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,271

    Default Re: Pumping in hospital?

    Which magazine was this?

    I've been thinking about this recommendation and while I think it's absolutely ridiculous, I think I understand why it has become so common, and that's because maternity care is letting moms and babies down. There are so many hospitals where early mama-baby separation is normal. Instead of being delivered right onto mom's chest and given a chance to nurse and bond, the baby is hustled off to a warmer and given a bath and weighed and measured and footprinted and given the little ID bracelet before mom has more than a token moment to cuddle it, let alone nurse it. And in a lot of places, babies spend most of their time in the nursery rather than rooming in with mom. And unfortunately, formula supplements and early pacifier introduction are all too common. The more mom and baby are separated, the more baby is given bottles and pacis, the slower baby will learn to nurse and the slower the mom's milk will come in- and I think that is why people are so gung-ho about pumping in the hospital.

    Since I'm feeling all about this, here's my checklist for the hospital:
    - If baby and mom are both healthy and strong after birth, baby should be immediately handed to mom so that she can warm up skin-to-skin on mom's bare chest. No trip to the warmer needed! Many babies will nurse within a few minutes of birth, and not only does that give the baby its first dose of colostrum and a chance to learn to nurse, but it also speeds the delivery of the placenta and causes the uterus to contract, reducing maternal blood loss and chances of postpartum hemorrhage.
    - All routine newborn procedures- weighing, measuring, bath, eye ointment, footprints, etc.- can be delayed for at least an hour after birth, allowing mom and baby uninterrupted bonding time.
    - Mom and baby should room in. The more time baby spends with mom, the faster mom and baby learn each other's cues and the faster mom's milk will come in. Also, there's much less chance that the baby will be slipped a paci or a bottle of formula by someone who is just trying to be helpful by letting mom rest!
    - If the baby needs to go to the nursery for health reasons, or if the mom chooses to send her baby to the nursery, at the baby should have a sign on the bassinet which says "I am a breastfed baby. No bottles or pacifiers please. Bring me to my mom whenever I cry, or every 2 hours if I don't."
    - The baby should not be supplemented with formula "just until mom's milk comes in". Colostrum is all a baby needs for the first 2-5 days until mom's milk comes in, and supplementing with formula will delay milk production.
    - If you're having a boy and planning on having him circumcised, wait until nursing is well established before having the procedure done. This may mean having the procedure done outside the hospital.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    168

    Default Re: Pumping in hospital?

    Can you even really pump colostrum? I had to hand express it while we worked on latching but I am certain no pump would have worked at that stage.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Pumping in hospital?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*evolvingmama View Post
    Can you even really pump colostrum? I had to hand express it while we worked on latching but I am certain no pump would have worked at that stage.
    It just lets lost in the pump/tubing!

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