Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    11

    Default tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    I'm currently 8mos pregnant and I really really want to breastfeed when the time comes. I had a breast reduction almost 4yrs ago. I went from a 38DDD to a 36C cup size afterwards. I've gained all sensation since then and my boobs have enlarged back to a 38D, I've even seen my nipple open up and this white crust appearing at times I'm not sure if it's colostrum.

    I do plan to rent a hospital grade pump to get my milk flow started and maybe try hand massage/expression at the same time. Any other tips to maximize my milk for my baby? I won't be going back to school for 4.5mos so I have time.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,571

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    Have you lined up a lactation consultant? An international, board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC) would be best. Have you talked to your OB/midwife about it? It sounds like you're making colostrum to me. Why do you think you will need the pump at the beginning?
    Tracie

    Mommy to
    Lilah 10/08 nursed 25 months
    Beatrix 01/11 nursed 30 months

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    miles from nowhere
    Posts
    11,126

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    definitely sounds like colostrum that's a great sign!

    From what I understand, breastfeeding success after a reduction depends a lot on which procedure they used. Here's a great website with a lot of info.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    miles from nowhere
    Posts
    11,126

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    The best tip I can give, which is what I'd say to any mama that wants to make breastfeeding successful, is to nurse nurse nurse those early days and weeks. It's totally normal for your baby to want to be on the breast all the time, that is what is going to stimulate your milk production and get it where it needs to be.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    Yes, I have a CNM and she is also an IBCLC. I'm planning to have a water birth at a birthing center. She recommended me to get a really good pump just in case I would need the extra boost for the let down reflex in the beginning since I had the surgery.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    That's something I hope to keep up with once my milk comes in because I want to maximize my production, I also won't introduce her to bottles until after 4wks. So I just plan to have her on my boob with a baby wrap at all times and give it to her on demand. How would I start a nice stash if I'm starting school in May? I'm due Jan 1st.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    miles from nowhere
    Posts
    11,126

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    I'd give it 6-8 weeks before you start pumping to build a stash, since you have so much time. That's assuming you don't end up needing to pump to help stimulate your production.

    Typically, it's best to let baby stimulate production, since not all women respond to the pump the same way they respond to the baby. The pump will never be as efficient at emptying your breast as your baby. And it also makes for a more regulated supply, since it's all based on supply and demand. But with a reduction, there is the possibility your supply may not be where it needs to be so if you are not producing enough milk and need to supplement you will definitely need the pump to mimic feedings, basically.

    Okay so lets go back to the assumption that you have no supply problems (since that's my favorite scenario ) and talk about building a stash. Around 6-8 weeks when your supply is fairly well-regulated and you and baby have settled into your groove with nursing you could start pumping once in the mornings (that's when most women's milk production is highest), maybe after nursing. You wouldn't get a whole lot to begin with, but if you do it regularly your body will adjust to make more at that time and you can, slowly but surely, build a stash. And if baby skips a feeding or sleeps through or only nurses on one side or whatever, you can pump then and get a little extra.

    So basically what I'm saying is you'll want to wait and see what works best for you and your baby. It really depends on what kind of eater your baby is and how your supply does. And that's true for any woman. You don't want to pump yourself into oversupply, which is as difficult to deal with in some ways as undersupply. And keep in mind you'll be pumping when you are away from your baby too, so you don't have to have a huge stash to cover all her needs because there will be fresh milk too.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    miles from nowhere
    Posts
    11,126

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    Here are some links to really helpful articles about getting started nursing and what you can realistically expect with a newborn.

    You could also try going to a local LLL meeting while you're pregnant and see nursing in action, make some contacts, etc. It's great to have support of people in real life, too, especially if there is reason to believe you might have some obstacles to overcome in the beginning.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    Thanks so much for all the info. I just need to wait and see what I'll be dealing with and go from there. I do plan to go to a local LLL meeting and get help/tips from the ladies, I've barely seen breastfeeding in real action which is crazy to say but true haha so this will very new to me even for myself. I just hope in succeeding and staying positive throughout this maximizing process.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    9,654

    Default Re: tips for breastfeeding after breast reduction

    here are three books to consider-

    1) The Womanly Art of Breatfeeding (8th edition, 2010)
    also
    Defining Your Own Success-breastfeeding after breast reduction surgery
    Making More Milk

    I put the Womanly Art first because for all you know at this point, you will have no issues at all making enough milk for your child. Every mother is an individual and milk production potential varies from mom to mom normally. For example, many mothers have overproduction issues that cause problems. and there is no way to know at this point if or how much your milk production potential has been affected by your surgery-or what your original potential was. I suggest, get informed as much as you have time for but don't assume anything. What works best for virtually all moms is to get baby to the breast asap after birth and then let biology take its course. learning some hand expression is a good idea, again for all expecting moms, as hand expression works better than pumps for many moms in the first few days when you will be expressing the first milk, colustrum, which is scant. Assuming baby latches and nurses normally, neither pumping nor hand expression are likely to be needed. And certainly you have plenty of time to get a stash for work built AFTER breastfeeding is well established.

    Many moms-even those with no possible pre-existing barriers to normal milk production-have a hard time in those early days. they erroneously assume baby is not getting enough or are told in error that baby is not getting enough, and breastfeeding and their confidence is thus unnecessarily undermined. Because of your history, your confidence may already be shaky. So understanding what is normal in the early hours and days in terms of weight gain and loss, nursing frequency and infant behavior is of paramount importance. I would also suggest having good support lined up (your IBCLC, LLL Leader, friends or family who have nursed) is a good ideas for all expecting moms. If you can attend an LLL meeting before baby comes, great!
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; November 13th, 2012 at 12:00 PM.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •