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Thread: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

  1. #1

    Default The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Really sorry how long this is, but I figure it's best if I give all details.

    I have been demand breastfeeding my 10.5 month old girl who is 14 lb 14 oz. She was discharged from the hospital at at 6 lb 3 oz. She has been following her curve, meeting milestones and is generally a happy )baby. At her 9 mo. check up, the doctor wasn't very concerned with her weight, but suggested supplementing either with formula or expressed BM. While she always has plenty of wet and dirty diapers and doesn't fuss at the breast, I have never felt confident with my supply. I can't supplement with expressed BM because I can only pump 1 oz. each session. 2 weeks ago she started sleeping through the night and I just have a bad feeling I'm not producing enough for her throughout the day. She eats 3 solid meals a day like a champ, but I'm always offering the breast prior to those feedings. There has been no way for me to tell though if something is wrong, as she isn't fussy at the breast nor seems upset when she pulls off. I'm pretty sure her latch is good, but when she starts swallowing after the let down (which I can never feel), she doesn't drink for long where I can hear the swallows, only a few minutes, if that.

    Well today got me very scared. I had a 5 oz. bottle in the fridge for my mom who watched her and she didn't end up needing it. When I came home I nursed her and decided to use the bottle, just to see if she'd take it after nursing and if so, how much she would drink. She inhaled the entire bottle SO fast! This really makes me feel like there is something wrong now ... if she had enough during the nursing session, why did she drink that bottle as if she never drank any milk before it? I am so scared and this is the first time in almost 11 months that I'm considering formula, which I REALLY don't want to do unless this is all concrete proof that I cannot meet her needs and I should supplement for the sake of her health.

    Thank you in advanced for any thoughts you have on my situation, in the meantime I'm going to start drinking Mothers Milk tea (is 1x a day enough and how soon can I see results?) along with eating steel cut oats.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    I don't understand why your doctor would not be concerned with her weight but then suggest supplementing. That doesn't make any sense to me. If she is following her curve and meeting milestones, and generally happy - what are you worrying about? I'm not trying to be snarky, I'm just wondering why you are concerned? If she seemed fine after you nursed her, why did you offer the bottle? She may have just sucked it all down because she wanted to suck and milk just kept coming out. It doesn't sound to me like you are having any issues, other than anxiety. If you want to increase her milk intake, I would back off on the solids completely and also wake her up to nurse in the middle of the night.

    If she's happy, you're seeing enough wet and dirty diapers, and everything seems ok - don't go looking for problems that aren't there.
    Tracie

    Mommy to
    Lilah 10/08 nursed 25 months
    Beatrix 01/11 nursed 30 months

  3. #3
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    Feb 2007
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    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommy2lilah View Post

    If she's happy, you're seeing enough wet and dirty diapers, and everything seems ok - don't go looking for problems that aren't there.

  4. #4

    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Thank you for your response. Sorry, I forgot to explain the reason why the doctor suggested supplementing was due to my response of pumping 1oz. ea. session when she randomly asked how much I can pump. I know pumping volume does not give a clear picture of the volume DD can take in while nursing. My main worries lie in the fact that a majority of the time when she's swallowing, it's only for a few minutes at each breast. The rest of the time is spent suckling, "hanging out", no active, strong sucks after a couple minutes. My breasts are also so much softer than they've ever been. I gave her the bottle just to see if she would take it or reject as the doctor said that would be a good way to know if she's getting enough from the breast. I thought that theory was crazy myself, but I gave in and tried it because I'm working myself up over here. It also doesn't help that everyone is always commenting on her size and comparing her to their FF children, etc. I've been able to handle it for a while, but I'm at a breaking point I suppose and looking too deep into things. Thank you again

  5. #5
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    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    with everything the PP said, but most especially with the following:

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommy2lilah View Post
    I don't understand why your doctor would not be concerned with her weight but then suggest supplementing. That doesn't make any sense to me. If she is following her curve and meeting milestones, and generally happy - what are you worrying about?
    I think it goes to show what one simple little tossed-off remark can do to a mom's confidence! It sounds like you're doing fine... So why freak out? It's possible that your doc is simply unfamiliar with the weight gain patterns of breastfed babies, who tend to slow down their weight gain in the second part of their first year, and often drop percentiles after the 6 month mark (or thereabouts).
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  6. #6
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    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Dont go crazy! My DD and yours are on the same curve. DD was born 6.3 and at 9 months was 15lbs. She was always in the 25%....

    dont panic, sounds like you and baby are doing great. If I had a dollar for every time they told me to suppliment, Id be rich! Just so you know, my DD eventually fell off the curve, was below it from 1-2 but got back at 2, and now at 3 1/2 is average height and weight.

    As long as she is thriving, having wet and dirty diapers, meeting milestones, etc...sounds like alll is fine!
    Mommy of 4,
    3 who I watch over, 1 who watches over all of us

    J- 8/20/05 pumped breastmilk for 11 months due to his cleft lip and palate!

    M- 10/17/07 my precious baby lives forever in her mommys heart

    M- 3/31/09 my special gift, she helps heal her mommy and daddys heart. Nursed for 4 years and 10 days, self weaned the day her baby brother was born!

    E-, new little miracle born 4/11/13, my BIG baby! Born 8.6 at 38 weeks. At 9 weeks nearly 17lbs, at 12 weeks nearly 20lbs, at 6 months nearly 23lbs, at 8 months nearly 25lbs and all from BREASTMILK


  7. #7
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    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Absolutely no reason to supplement here AT ALL. Your child is growing, gaining, and eating fine. DO NOT create a problem by introducing a supplement where there is ZERO need. Your milk is fine. Your child is fine. Step away from the self doubt. 4 more weeks. You can do it.

    Way too lazy for formula

  8. #8
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    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*giasmom View Post
    I forgot to explain the reason why the doctor suggested supplementing was due to my response of pumping 1oz. ea. session when she randomly asked how much I can pump.
    The fact that the doc asked the "how much can you pump" question in the first place points to ignorance about breastfeeding. For a mom who is home with her baby and nursing on demand, the answer to that question could be "nothing at all" even though the mom has plenty of milk and the baby is just fine! And since babies will often take enormous bottles even after a successful nursing session, seeing if the baby will take a bottle is also totally meaningless.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    The fact that the doc asked the "how much can you pump" question in the first place points to ignorance about breastfeeding. For a mom who is home with her baby and nursing on demand, the answer to that question could be "nothing at all" even though the mom has plenty of milk and the baby is just fine! And since babies will often take enormous bottles even after a successful nursing session, seeing if the baby will take a bottle is also totally meaningless.
    . at 10 months I left my baby for 8hours with someone and it took me 2 days to pump 6 oz. It didn't mean I didn't have milk. It meant my body was like "WTF?" Because I had fed on demand so long my body didn't understand the Que.

    Way too lazy for formula

  10. #10

    Default Re: The moment I've dreaded ... formula time?

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*giasmom View Post
    My main worries lie in the fact that a majority of the time when she's swallowing, it's only for a few minutes at each breast. The rest of the time is spent suckling, "hanging out", no active, strong sucks after a couple minutes.
    Babies get pretty efficient at nursing and nurse for shorter periods of time as they get older. 5 minute feedings are common.

    As long as your baby's growth and weight gain is on track and she has unrestricted access to nursing (no strict feeding schedules), then there's no need to worry about how much milk she's taking in. If you want to be certain, you can always offer to nurse more often. It can't hurt and she'll let you know if she's hungry or not.
    Karen
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