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Thread: Milk protein issues, lactose overload or something else?

  1. #1

    Default Milk protein issues, lactose overload or something else?

    I have been EBF my DD since birth. She will be 4 months old on 10/13. She has a good latch and nurses well in general. I have had oversupply issues and as a result, she block feeds. We don't switch sides and she will usually take the same breast 2 feedings a row. I get plugged ducts often and have had more nipple blisters ("blebs") than I care to recollect. She is gaining weight (12 lb, 8 oz) and reaching all of her developmental milestones.

    Within the last 3 weeks, she has become extremely gassy to the point where she is crying hysterically in pain (mostly occurs at night). My husband and I work her legs and massage her tummy. This seems to help her pass the gass. In addition to the gas, she has had frequent green, mucousy stool. We are even to the point now where she has diarrhea (5 poopy diapers in 4.5 hours last night). To top it off, last night we noticed streaky red blood in her stool. Per our pediatrician's recommendation, I am on a dairy-free diet (have been for one week now), DD is getting probiotics daily (Bio Gaia) and I am taking Omega-3's. We also collected stool for an analysis (not an easy task!). The preliminary results were negative for ova and parasites and negative for blood (the 3 samples from earlier this week did not have any visible blood, contrary from the stools last night). However, the leukocyte test showed "few" leukocytes. Our pediatrician is out of the office today but the one who spoke with said this only indicates that there is "intestinal inflamation." We are still waiting on the culture results and the rotazyme test. We have an appointment to see a pediatric gastroenterologist at the end of the month.

    At this point, I am at a loss. I am not sure whether DD is experiencing a milk protein sensitivity (or another kind, i.e. soy) or if her symptoms can all be related to oversupply/lactose overload issues or it's something else entirely. I understand that it can take 3 weeks for milk proteins to be completely eliminated from my system and hers, and I will continue the dairy free diet. If it's an overload issue, I don't know how to correct it. We already block feed and she never switches sides. Stopping EBF is not an option, not only because I want to continue it for the nutritional value as well as the bonding experience, but because DD flat out refuses to take a bottle. My husband and I haven't been sick and she hasn't been around anyone who has been so I would be shocked if it was some type of contagious infection.

    I am wondering if anyone can offer any insight at all? TIA!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Milk protein issues, lactose overload or something else?

    It does sound a lot like an allergy/sensitivity to me. And dairy is usually the most likely culprit, or at least the first one people look at. Have you seen any improvements in her symptoms since you started the elimination diet?

    The fact that the blood in her stool is coming now, three weeks after you've eliminated dairy, is interesting. Check the supplements- the probiotics and omega-3s and make sure they don't contain any dairy ingredients. Then think about what you've replaced milk with in your diet or what you might be eating more of now that you weren't eating before. Are you drinking soy milk? Almond milk? (both common allergens)
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  3. #3

    Default Re: Milk protein issues, lactose overload or something else?

    I have seen minimal, if any, improvement since I started the elimination diet. I checked the probiotics and the Omega-3's. Neither have dairy. I have tried soy and almond milk (and by tried, I mean I tasted them, lol)- I didn't like the taste of either one. The only "milk" I've had is Rice Dream with cereal. I have not, however, eliminated eggs from my diet. In my research, I've read that eggs should usually be eliminated along with dairy, so it's something I'm going to look at now.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Milk protein issues, lactose overload or something else?

    Are there any other symptoms of an allergy? Rashes/eczema, congestion, red ring around the anus?

    How strict are you being in your elimination? Are you familiar with 'hidden' forms of dairy? Here's a great 'cheat sheet' you can use when looking at ingredients.

    Do you know for sure you have oversupply or are you wondering if that may be the problem based on symptoms?

    I definitely don't think stopping EBF is necessary in your case. You can figure this out, it just may take a little time. It can be a little tricky determining first of all whether baby is actually reacting to something in your diet and then figuring out what it is. I've been there, I know it's frustrating. But it sounds like other than the discomfort your baby is healthy and doing fine, so just keep nursing while you try to figure it out.
    “We are not put on earth for ourselves, but are placed here for each other. If you are there always for others, then in time of need, someone will be there for you.”
    --Anonymous

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Milk protein issues, lactose overload or something else?

    Could she actually be ill-a virus?
    And what else are you doing for the oald? Block feeding is supposed to help reduce overall milk production. But in the meantime, block feeding could actually worsen the oald that could cause the foremilk overload that can cause issues.
    How many times a day does baby nurse? Frequent nursing can help with oald.
    Stopping nursing is not neccesary or helpful from a baby's health standpoint no matter if the issue is allergy or oald or illness.
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; October 5th, 2012 at 05:09 PM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Milk protein issues, lactose overload or something else?

    All I can tell you is that with my son, I could tell a huge difference in him three days after I stopped eating dairy. However, I noticed even further difference after I started reading the labels on EVERYTHING and eliminating 100% of the dairy in my diet (who knew English muffins had milk in them, or jelly candies?). I would be inclined to think it isn't dairy, unless she is super sensitive and you haven't completely and 100% eliminated all of it. I think you can figure it out. Dairy isn't the only allergen for sure, maybe try eliminating soy. I, too, had to block feed, and had just got that worked out when the dairy sensitivity popped up. I found that I had to go six hours at a time for the block feeding, even though my midwife had suggested doing 4 hours at a time.

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