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Thread: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    4,894

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    I have to nurse my son - even now that he's 2 - before changing his diaper. You will figure it out. You have a passionate baby, which will be a really good thing when you have breastfeeding under control. Do you think the spit up was from being so worked up and then eating too quickly? Have you tried to dream feed? What I might consider is once she starts stirring as if she might wake, I would lay down next to her and let her latch in her sleep, then let her wake on the breast. It might calm you both down until your letdown and her temperament calm a bit.
    If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun. - Katharine Hepburn

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    57

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    I'm pretty sure the spit-up is more impressive when she's been crying a lot, yes, though I don't think she ate any faster than normal. I have tried feeding before fully awake but it's a nonstarter: she will not latch even as she is falling asleep, and only occasionally has seemed to be dozing as she finished off a feed. I will keep trying that though. Thanks again for the advice.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    It's like you are telling my story, only you are telling it way better than I can. I am dealing with all of this too. Exactly! Oversupply, sleeping g after latch, the whole thing. So, if I get relief, I'll let you know and if you do, please let ,e know how. I have a 2 year old and I'm exhausted!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    57

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    Update: at the end of last week, after another harrowing day of screaming during/after every feeding, I called the doctor and asked if it sounded like the GER she had suspected before, and if this would qualify as being fussy all day---her criteria for when to consider using meds. She thought so, and Saturday we started a moderate dose of Zantac. Through Tuesday it was much the same, but now I think we're seeing improvement. Correction, I know we're seeing improvement, but part of me can't help but wonder if it's more how I'm learning to deal with her---trying other comfort measures besides nursing when she seems still hungry and crying, because I really do feel like overfeeding and lactose overload could be a large part of the issue here. She is very gassy and I haven't been addressing that---sometimes it calms her right down when I press her legs up into her stomach or bicycle them, and I feel so dumb for always assuming that her screaming was due either to reflux or hunger. But while she's been sleeping these past couple days (YAY) I've had time to read lots about other possible causes and try addressing those in the meantime, rather than flying by the seat of my pants.

    I have also started managing the oversupply more aggressively since it's been four weeks since I started the one side per feeding policy and I'm just not seeing much of a difference. I'm always very full/engorged in the mornings even when she's up every two hours at night to eat. (Last night she slept for 3.5 hours during one stretch---wonderful to catch up on sleep but I am sooo uncomfortable on the right side at the moment. ) So since yesterday I've started going as long as it takes to empty one side before moving to the other, which in the morning seems like upwards of 3 feedings. Yikes. After reading an article by an IBCLC on lactose overload, it seems that since the abundant foremilk is digested more quickly, and thus she gets hungry again sooner, sometimes feedings get so close together that the beginning of another feeding forces lots of undigested lactose through to the large intestine and causes bad gas and cramping. At any rate she is finally taking naps again during the day, not every feeding is hellish by any means, and I get to see my baby happy and smiling during her alert times now.

    Earth's baby, I feel your pain. The vibe I'm getting more and more from the seasoned moms on here is that breastfeeding is just not always this textbook, calm, perfectly harmonic thing, because babies are so new to LIFE and they change rapidly and there are a hundred variables that could make them fussy one day and happy the next--- and so I need to relax and not assume something must be WRONG if we're struggling a bit! I hope it gets easier for you, though. I certainly look forward to the day when nursing is more predictable and enjoyable for both of us, but I'm learning to take it one day at a time and be grateful (very grateful the more I read these forums!) that we have had no serious setbacks. Edited to add: I'm sorry, I just re-read that you have a 2-year-old and you're not some clueless first-time mom like me. I assume BF was easier with your first? That must make it even more bewildering to have a second baby who isn't the most natural nurser...and I can't imagine the exhaustion of keeping up with both kids!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern Cal.
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    4,984

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    Some babies have a REALLY hard time with the OALD (overactive letdown). They haaaaaaaate it, and nursing is sometimes just pretty darn hard for the first couple months.

    However, all babies eventually grow into that fast letdown, and even an ample supply will eventually calm down. I'm not saying do nothing about it, but I just hope that knowing that this will most likely fix itself even if you do nothing might help you relax a little bit? I have had some degree of oversupply and a mean case of OALD with both of my babies. My little girl is just now really solidly growing into my OALD (is actually happy and gulping away). It takes time, but it happens. Some babies have a harder time with it than others, and it sounds like your baby finds it pretty unpleasant and overwhelming (hence the scream fests). But it will get easier, I promise! By the three/four month mark, this will just be a memory.

    I don't want to throw suggestions at you that you've already heard and tried, but have you tried nursing while walking around jiggling your baby a bit. That always seemed to help mine when they were getting really fussy at the breast.

    This is going to to get better, probably pretty soon.


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    57

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    Thank you! She does seem to gulp happily most of the time, but I've definitely learned it's better to risk making her a little mad taking her off when I knew the letdown is going to be crazy (like this morning) and letting it spray into a towel for a minute. I thought I would never be coordinated enough to nurse while walking but I HAD to learn it last week, it was the only way to get her latched sometimes. Now I feel so much more confident just having that under my belt. Jiggling is very soothing for my baby too and I often do that before letdown if she looks like she's about to give up and pull off screaming because she has to wait. I meant to update with a couple tips about things I have learned:

    - If baby looks like she's in an impatient mood and seems about to pull off and freak out before letdown, do whatever you do to soothe your baby when fussing BEFORE she gets there---for me that is loud "shushing" and gently jiggling her with the hand supporting her butt. Sounds and probably looks bizarre as all get out, but it works!
    - as mentioned above, sometimes walking with the baby is soothing and distracting in the perfect combination, so that a baby too mad to latch again while sitting will finally get it while walking around, WITHOUT then falling asleep immediately.
    - If you have a private place outside (or else just don't care what your neighbors see...and I'm getting to that point, hah), just going from indoors to outdoors can instantly calm and, again, helpfully distract the baby from her screaming just enough that she'll latch and get back into a decent rhythm to finish or at least continue a feeding.
    - Don't get into a rut thinking that it's one or two things causing the fussiness, so that you forget other maybe more obvious possibilities. I've been trying to cloth diaper but my baby HATES the feeling of being wet in the prefolds I sometimes use, so I've learned to either be prepared to do a diaper change STAT mid-feed, or just use the stay-dry pockets or AIOs which aren't nearly so uncomfortable. Sometimes she will come out of a deep sleep to scream in protest that her prefold (even with a fleece liner) is wet. I'm not a fan of those for that reason.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*joe.s.mom View Post
    Some babies have a REALLY hard time with the OALD (overactive letdown). They haaaaaaaate it, and nursing is sometimes just pretty darn hard for the first couple months.

    However, all babies eventually grow into that fast letdown, and even an ample supply will eventually calm down. I'm not saying do nothing about it, but I just hope that knowing that this will most likely fix itself even if you do nothing might help you relax a little bit? I have had some degree of oversupply and a mean case of OALD with both of my babies. My little girl is just now really solidly growing into my OALD (is actually happy and gulping away). It takes time, but it happens. Some babies have a harder time with it than others, and it sounds like your baby finds it pretty unpleasant and overwhelming (hence the scream fests). But it will get easier, I promise! By the three/four month mark, this will just be a memory.

    I don't want to throw suggestions at you that you've already heard and tried, but have you tried nursing while walking around jiggling your baby a bit. That always seemed to help mine when they were getting really fussy at the breast.

    This is going to to get better, probably pretty soon.

  7. #17

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    Great advice tejana. I'm so happy you're seeing an improvement. My first was difficult too and I gave up at 5 months so that's why this is especially hard for me, I really want to be successful for the long haul. So I don't feel at all like a seasoned mama, there is so much I still need to learn. I have an LC but hearing it from other moms. (Like you) makes it easier to understand what's going on. And I agree, sometimes it's an obvious thing and we work ourselves up.

    I cloth diaper too! It's not easy with two in diapers but its worth it. It's hard to cd a fussy baby, lol! Especially if they're very particular.

    Sounds like you know your baby very well and are doing a great job!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    Well shoot. Block feeding fixed the OS in a day and a half...but now I want the oversupply back! I may have overdone it! not only do I feel very soft all day, except when letdown occurs, but my baby hasn't seemed satisfied after eating off both sides, and is getting frustrated enough that she won't even open her mouth when I offer whichever side feels fuller in response to her rooting. Then she loses interest enough to fall asleep only to repeat the cycle an hour or two later... Obviously if she were ravenous then that wouldn't be happening, but I can't figure out if this is just normal adjusting to what I presume is slower flow, or if I'm actually dealing with supply lower than what she needs...? She's crying so I'm off to try and feed again.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern Cal.
    Posts
    4,984

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    It is possible to "overshoot" with the block feeding and end up slightly lower than you need to be. But a day or two of nursing on demand should fix that no problem. Your baby may also be protesting having to work a little harder for her milk (funny, since she doesn't like the OALD either, right? )

    My recommendation would be to stop trying to tinker with your supply and just feed her on demand. Give her one side if that's enough, or both if it's not. You may have OALD sometimes, but she will grow into that. Similarly, sometimes your milk may not be fast enough for her, and she may be a little fussy about that, but she'll figure it out. She seems to be a bit spirited/passionate/fussy, and that's probably just her personality, you know?


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Does this pattern sound familiar to anyone?

    Thanks for the reassurance. I will definitely not be trying such drastic block feeding again--oversupply has not been a big enough problem to offset the uncertainty now about what I've done to my supply! I know it's premature to panic since just late yesterday and today have been when I've noticed a big difference, but I can't help but want to stock up on fenugreek... Plus it's coinciding with just an extremely sleepy day for my baby. She has those sometimes, but they like every other little thing make me worry something's wrong, and today especially I'm wanting her to feed a lot longer and more frequently than she seems to want to do. (she is now dozing again after a whopping four minutes of good active sucking...sigh. Nothing wakes this baby except putting her down and waiting for her to protest, so I guess I'll try that again.)

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