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Thread: Fixing bad latch in 3 month old

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    212

    Default Fixing bad latch in 3 month old

    Is it possible to fix an inefficient latch in a 3 month old? Is it too late?

    My nipple has always been lipstick shaped after nursing, but I was told by the IBCLC in the hospital that she'd likely grow into a better latch, and then was told by a LLL leader that as long as I wasn't in pain and she was growing, we didn't need to worry about it.

    Well, now my oversupply has regulated (possibly a little too low) and she seems to be having trouble transferring milk efficiently. When I ha oversupply she didn't need a strong latch or suck, but now she does. She's still producing enough wets and good poops, but her weight gain hasn't been as good as before. Last week it was just 4 ounces. Thr week before was 7oz, but before that it was 5oz. She used to be consistently 7 ounces every week. N

    Beyond the weight issue, she's also fussy at the breast. I mentioned this in other posts, but on Dr. Newsman's advice, I am working to increase my supply to increase the "flow" because he thinks that's the root of her fussiness/popping off constantly. We'll see. It sounds like he wants me basically at a slight oversupply in order for the flow to be fast enough for her happiness and to make up for a less than ideal latch.

    So, I've watched latching videos and such and we're working with a new IBCLC. However, it just seems like she refuses to take the breast any further in than before. Also, her suck has never felt very strong. Can anything be done to strengthen a suck?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    212

    Default Re: Fixing bad latch in 3 month old

    Sorry - meant to post this in 3-12 months!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    10,440

    Default Re: Fixing bad latch in 3 month old

    Has anyone evaluated for a tongue tie? Some types are very difficult to diagnose.

    Personally, I don't know if I would worry so much about weight.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    46

    Default Re: Fixing bad latch in 3 month old

    I was still in pain at 3 months, it only really stopped hurting around 3 1/2 - 4 months. My son did have tongue tie and had it clipped (twice), and we had several sessions of cranial osteopathy, but I don't know how much this all helped. But we are doing much better now, I think he just got bigger and can fit more of my breast in his mouth. I noticed yesterday that he seems to have some degree of lip tie, but probably won't do anything about this now as nursing is no longer painful. I hope things get better for you soon xx

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    46

    Default Re: Fixing bad latch in 3 month old

    Here is a link to my story if you want to know what we went through

    http://forums.llli.org/showthread.ph...17#post1288717

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    212

    Default Re: Fixing bad latch in 3 month old

    Thanks for your replies!

    Our IBCLC has checked her for tongue tie, but is also planning to check further tomorrow when we see her.

    Indigoelectron - thanks for sharing your story! I was particularly glad to read your post on another thread where you said your baby's latch improved by waiting for obvious feeding cues to feed. I had the exact conversation with our IBCLC yesterday. Only, in terms of it helping my baby's fussiness. I've also always just offered on a whim, whenever I felt like it. Everyone always said that babies can suck without drawing milk and will just refuse if they don't want to nurse. But it seems like my daughter would always draw milk, even if she really wasn't hungry, and she would become very upset. Or just take a little, then never really have good feedings. Anyway, long story short, that's my goal for today - to closely watch HER cues and offer to nurse when she acts like she wants to (even, like you said, her feedings space out further than I'm used to), instead of all the time. We'll see if that helps with her fussiness. I did notice she opened MUCH wider this morning when she obviously wanted to eat. Now, I just have to be patient and allow her to take the lead and trust she will nurse as much as she needs, even if it's less than I thought she should...

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