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Thread: Bag -o- questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    23

    Post Bag -o- questions

    This is my first time posting. I have been reading these posts and my "Womanly Art of Breastfeeding" book for weeks waiting for an answers to jump out at me and it hasn't. So here it goes...

    I have a 7 week old daughter that has been doing some goofy things when nursing for the past week. Periodically she will get fussy at the breast. Kinda sounded like the "four month fussiness" mentioned in the book. She will cry and latch. I take her off and she cries like she's mad I did that. I don't really know how else to describe her when she has these "fits". So, I try different things. I burp her, I change positions, I change sides, etc. I should mention that I have two very different breast, while both are large (DD) I have one nipple that is substantially larger than the other. Eventually this fit passes with her and she nurses. I just want to avoid the fit/fussiness while nursing all together. Any advice?

    Next question, I will be retuning to work in October. I would like to pump soon to start working up a supply. How can I do this if my baby is nursing every 2-3 hours? And is that normal for a 7 week old to nurse that much still? Currently, she will nurse on both sides every time for about 15-28 mins on each breast. I do notice my left side holds more milk than my right. I have a 4 year old daughter that I nursed for only 6 weeks then pumped for two before I gave up, long story. So anything past 6 weeks is new territory for me. What is a good pumping schedule? I am so never that I will be taking some much needed milk from her. I should also add that she was slow to gain back her birth weight, which I think was inflated a bit because of all the fluids I had at delivery. I weighed her this morning on my own adult scale and I think she is around 10 lbs now.

    Should I still be taking my prenatal vitamin?

    Is it normal for her to be angry at the breast before let down? This is something new she has been doing.

    I don't know if this matters, but she is also a very demanding baby. She refuses to be put down at all. She constantly needs to be held or in her wrap. Doesn't like going to dad either.

    I would greatly appreciate any and all help/advise.
    Thanks ladies!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    48

    Default Re: Bag -o- questions

    First off, congrats on continuing breastfeeding!

    I can't really help you with the fussiness... My DS is going through the same thing, but he's not far from being 4 months.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*ssotka View Post
    Next question, I will be retuning to work in October. I would like to pump soon to start working up a supply. How can I do this if my baby is nursing every 2-3 hours? And is that normal for a 7 week old to nurse that much still? Currently, she will nurse on both sides every time for about 15-28 mins on each breast. I do notice my left side holds more milk than my right. I have a 4 year old daughter that I nursed for only 6 weeks then pumped for two before I gave up, long story. So anything past 6 weeks is new territory for me. What is a good pumping schedule? I am so never that I will be taking some much needed milk from her. I should also add that she was slow to gain back her birth weight, which I think was inflated a bit because of all the fluids I had at delivery. I weighed her this morning on my own adult scale and I think she is around 10 lbs now.
    It is perfectly normal for her to nurse that much! Mine still nurses that much, and my SIL's DS still nursed every 2 hours when he was 7 months. That's perfectly normal, and so is her time spent on each breast. AS for pumping, I think most women are able to pump the most milk in the morning, so maybe try waiting 30 minutes after her first morning feeding before pumping.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*ssotka View Post
    Should I still be taking my prenatal vitamin?
    Yes, that's probably a good idea. I'm still taking it.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*ssotka View Post
    Is it normal for her to be angry at the breast before let down? This is something new she has been doing.
    Yes that's normal. If it's really bothersome, you could try expressing a little by hand if you're able until let down, so she doesn't have to wait.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*ssotka View Post
    I don't know if this matters, but she is also a very demanding baby. She refuses to be put down at all. She constantly needs to be held or in her wrap. Doesn't like going to dad either.
    Some babies are just that way, and it is in no way a reflection on you! My DS is pretty "demanding" too. Dr. Sears has a lot of good things to say about high-need babies: http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/par...high-need-baby

    I'm Erin, wife to a wonderful husband, and first time mother of Baby Will - 05/13/2012

    "Keep calm and latch on!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,259

    Default Re: Bag -o- questions

    Fussiness-lots of things can cause fussy fits at the breast. Forceful letdown, gas pain, reflux, slow let down. These can sometimes, be problems that need 'solutions' if they are really interfering with nursing or babies happiness on a regular basis, but if they are mostly occasional, ( say, a couple times a day) then it's probably not anything to worry about. I think the vast majority of the time, it's just what I would call a ‘fussy fit of unknown origin.’ Babies fuss, some more than others, it's just normal, and the techniques you are using
    I burp her, I change positions, I change sides, etc.
    all make sense to me. Mommal (regular poster) has a good list of things to try for long fuss periods. Also as pp suggested, Dr. Sears, or this list: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...ybabyideas.pdf

    If anyone has a full proof way to keep all babies, all the time, idyllic, calm little nursing angels at the breast, I want to hear it. It’s just not reality. Sometimes you get the idyllic angel, and sometimes you get the red faced screaming banshee baby too.

    Feeding frequency-from around 6-8 weeks on, a baby would normally need to nurse a minimum of 8 times a 24 hour day. MINIMUM. Way more often is normal too. (prior to that, the minimum would be 10-12 times a day.) It may not be a regular thing every 2-3 hours, as many babies prefer to cluster feed, so they will nurse many times close together (say, during those fussy times) and then may take a longer sleep stretch. Around 3-5 months or so- it’s very individual-any babies get more efficient and nursing sessions become generally shorter and, maybe, a bit less frequent. It is important to remember that frequent nursing sessions- cue feeding-allow a breastfed baby to get enough to eat and for the breastfeeding mom to keep producing enough milk. This is why scheduling, aka baby training, is usually such a bad idea for breastfed babies.

    Pumping: Remember you will keep pumping once you are back at work-you will have to, to keep supply up-and what you pump at work on Monday will presumably be enough for baby to have on Tuesday. So the stash you build up now will be for 1) day one, and 2) as a litttle extra cushion for the first few days just in case it takes a couple of days to get into a pumping rhythm/feel comfortable pumping at work/ to get your at work pump output up and 3) for emergencies. In other words, you do not need gallons saved up, every mom has a different level of comfort for what they want to have ‘stashed.’ I suggest that while at home with baby, pump, at most, once a day, maybe increasing that only if you need to, in order to have enough stash to feel comfortable.

    Your body is always making milk, so if you are concerned you will pump and then baby will want to nurse 10 minutes later, don't be. Just let baby nurse, it will be fine.

    Remember-and this is really important-what amount you pump is NOT reflective of what your baby can extract. Babies are better at 'milking' the breast than a pump is. Some moms produce great for the pump, others do not. What a nursing mom pumps is not reflective of her milk supply. And what you can pump while home and nursing around the clock will probably be much less than what you will be able to pump when you are at work.

    Another tip-make sure your babies caregiver knows how to feed baby in a breastfeeding supportive way. This is important/helpful for many reasons.
    see http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf and http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/milkcalc/
    Do you have the latest edition of The Womanly Art-2010, 8th edition? The chapters about pumping/back to work are quite good. Kellymom.com is another great breastfeeding resource.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,808

    Default Re: Bag -o- questions

    with all the above, but most especially with this:
    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lllmeg View Post
    If anyone has a full proof way to keep all babies, all the time, idyllic, calm little nursing angels at the breast, I want to hear it. It’s just not reality. Sometimes you get the idyllic angel, and sometimes you get the red faced screaming banshee baby too.
    I think one of the hardest things for a mom- particularly a breastfeeding mom- to do is to relinquish the idea that everything her baby does or doesn't do is in some way under her control. So when your baby fusses, and you try everything to coothe her and she is STILL fussing, take a deep breath and try to remember that sometimes babies fuss and it's not your fault, your milk, your attitude, what you had for breakfast, the phase of the moon, etc. It's just a baby being a baby.

    Some things you can do to cope with the fussy periods:
    - Nurse. Nurse, nurse, nurse, nurse, nurse. Baby can't scream when there's a breast in her mouth, thank goodness!
    - Motion. Put baby in a sling or swing, take her for a ride in a car or stroller, bounce her on an exercise ball, rock in a chair, etc.
    - Calm house. Keep the lights low, the stereo and tv down or preferably off.
    - Closeness. Snuggle baby close to bare skin- your smell, and the sound of your breathing and heartbeat are naturally soothing. Dad can do this, too!
    - White noise. Tune the radio to static, or run the vacuum.
    - Warm bath (no soap).
    - Trip outside.
    In particular, I recommend the last two items on the list. For my girls those things were magic. They'd be screaming away but I'd pop them in the sink or take them outside and all of a sudden they'd be angel babies again. After having 2 kids, I am convinced that the key to dealing with a fussy, tired baby is to change the baby's incoming sensory stimuli.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,018

    Default Re: Bag -o- questions

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    After having 2 kids, I am convinced that the key to dealing with a fussy, tired baby is to change the baby's incoming sensory stimuli.
    I could not agree more! If you think about it, this is really true for everyone - a "change of scene" usually helps when we're upset.
    My DD likes to be undressed and gently massaged with olive oil - usually this works when she is just starting to get fussy but not if she's full-blown crying.

    Molly

    Loving mama to JP (DS, 1/03 ~ nursed 6 mos), EL (DD1, 9/05 ~ nursed 4 yrs), EJ (DD2, 3/08 ~ nursed 3 yrs 9 mos), and
    JM (DD3, 6/12 ~ currently nursing), all born naturally
    Devoted wife to SAHD P, my hero
    A few of my favorite things that I've discovered on the forum: co-sleeping, baby-wearing, tandem nursing, baby-led solids, cloth diapering, APing, selective vaccination...the list goes on

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