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Thread: Screaming after eating

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    50

    Default Screaming after eating

    My daughter is 6 weeks old. She cries alot and has since birth. She was diagnosed with silent reflux two weeks ago and we started Zantac. I noticed some improvement immediately. She had some calm awake moments and stoppped choking and gagging. One thing I noticed recently is she eats well and is then happy for 30 minutes to an hour. After that she screams until i feed her again. We go back to the doc on wednesday, and I will ask about possible allergy, but I was wondering if there could be a feeding issue I am missing.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,613

    Default Re: Screaming after eating

    It doesn't really sound like an issue so much as normal baby behavior. She's 6 weeks old, which is when many babies go through their second big growth spurt and suddenly eat very frequently. And 30-60 minutes between feeds... Well, 30 minutes is on the short side but still quite normal, and 60 minutes is textbook normal. Is your concern that baby is eating too often? Because if so, she's not.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    50

    Default Re: Screaming after eating

    My main concern is that she would stay on the breast all day if i would let her. This would be fine except she goes to school next week when I go back to work. They will not accomodate her wanting to eat every hour. Also, I am concerned that she is not sleeping more than about two hours total during the day. She does this in 15 to 30 min. spurts and screams in between. I also have a two year old that limits the amount of time I can spend feeding my little one. My last concern is she seems so distressed. Her crying is not fussy, it is full on screaming to the point where sometimes she is gasping for breath.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,613

    Default Re: Screaming after eating

    Okay, then I think you really need to talk to your doc about your LO's reflux and whether or not it's under control. It's not that your LO's sleeping or feeding behavior is so unusual- it's not- it's the distressed screaming that makes me think something may be up with her meds. Babies grow fast and often outgrow their dosage.

    I'm a little concerned when you say your daycare provider won't accommodate your baby wanting to eat every hour. If it's what she needs, why won't they do it? I mean, that's a semi-rhetorical question because I am sure the DCP has other babies to care for and doesn't want to spend excessive time on your particular baby. However, if your baby NEEDS extra attention, they need thave willing to give it to her. Maybe by wearing her in a sling, or having her nap in a swing, or making sure she has frequent small bottles instead of infrequent large ones (which is how babies should be fed, regardless).
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5

    Default Re: Screaming after eating

    Medical issues aside, may I suggest that maybe your baby is more distressed because you have unrealistic expectations of what is normal at this age and, since you are understandably concerned about her health, you are trying to hold baby to an impossible standard for this particular baby. Perhaps your older child was not as needy as this child, that is often how it is, babies can be so different. But as mommal says, there is nothing abnormal in your baby needing to nurse this often.

    Reflux is often helped by smaller, frequent feedings. When your baby starts to cry, or even before that point, if you can catch it-what if you just let her nurse? And what about after you nurse-do you keep holding baby? If baby truly has painful reflux, laying flat will be very uncomfortable for baby, and she will perhaps be happier held upright in your arms. But even if the reflux is under control, few babies enjoy being laid down away from momma to sleep. They tend to sleep much better when held by momma or whoever their caregiver is, perhaps in a sling.

    You cannot make or 'train' a 6 week old baby to want to nurse less than is normal or not need almost constant physical holding. As far as baby is concerned, it's prehistoric times, they are an easy mouthful, and instinctually they know their survival depends on being held by a trusted adult. While babies will differ a great deal in how quickly they ramp up fussiness and in crying decibels, generally, if they are nursed on cue and held as much as they need, baby will sleep more, (yes usually in short snatches) scream less, and have less gastrointestinal issues which are exacerbated by the stress of crying and screaming.

    If the school is unable to accommodate the normal needs of normal newborns the problem is the school, not your baby. Maybe they do not need to feed baby every hour, I suspect that will not be the case, as your baby is probably nursing at least partly for comfort. But they should have some plan for developmentally appropriate comforting and care of the infants entrusted to their care. see http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/f...ottle-feeding/ and http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfedbaby.pdf

    As far as your two year old limiting the time you spend nursing... Well, I hear this a lot on here, about the demands of older children superseding the needs of the infant. And I really do not get it. I mean, I get that it is hard, but-that's life. I am not unsympathetic; I really have been there-and...you make it work. That's part of being a mom, you prioritize. Your baby needs what she needs when she needs it, and because she is an utterly helpless newborn baby, those needs are more immediately pressing than even a two year old's. Plus there are lots of ways to keep baby close while doing things with your toddler. Try finding ways to nurse on the go, try a sling or baby carrier, having special toys or books just for nursing times, whatever works for you. This time of super neediness is short, but meeting your infant's needs now will pay off in the end.

    Allergies from breastmilk are very rare and way, way over diagnosed. I would hate to see your stress added to by unnecessary diet limitations. Have you considered if forceful letdown is part of the problem? Forceful letdown is misdiagnosed as painful reflux and/or allergies all the time. And ffld can make reflux worse too. http://kellymom.com/bf/got-milk/supp.../fast-letdown/

    Info on allergies in breastfed babies http://www.bfmed.org/Media/Files/Pro...ish_120211.pdf

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