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Thread: Pumping to increase supply

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    21,349

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    At no age is wanting to eat every hour a symptom of a problem or of low supply. It's just normal baby behavior. Some babies are simply very frequent feeders. You only want to worry about supply if baby is not producing adequate diapers or is not gaining enough weight.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    , frequent nursing alone is not a sign of any issues. IN fact, as long as baby is gaining well, frequent nursing is good and healthy. While every baby is different, babies typically NEED to nurse at least 10-12 times a day for about the first 6 to 8 weeks at the very least. However, babies do typically become more efficient and nurse for shorter periods over time-so the nursing sessions may remain frequent but may become shorter overall. And eventually baby will typically nurse less frequently as well. But exactly when and in what order all this happens is very individual.

    Nursing is more than a food delivery system, it is natures way for a baby to be comforted and for mom and baby to connect and that is one reason why how much a particular baby nurses will vary so much.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    24

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    Okay, baby has NOT gained her birth weight back. She was 8lbs 8.5oz at birth and today she was 8lbs 4oz. I had to stop taking the fenugreek...again...because it causes me to have uterine cramps, nausea and diarrhea. I didn't notice that it caused any distress in my daughter the first time I took it, but this second time she was affected. She has had major diarrhea today and a little yesterday. She has pooped a TON of watery, yellow poops that fill her diaper and spill out sometimes. She cries even after I feed her and supplement her, so I belive she is nauseous or having GI cramps. I feel terrible for taking a supplement that affected her this way.

    I do have a low milk supply. Baby does not have enough wet diapers or poopy diapers and the poopy diapers are green unless I take a herbal supplement. When I was taking fenugreek she was finally having normal output and she was more satisfied at the breast and I didn't have to supplement with formula. I need to boost my supply and I believe I can do that by pumping. Baby can't latch properly yet and I believe that is affecting my supply. My IBCLC said that my nipples are pretty large and baby can't get a deep enough latch yet. She thinks eventually she'll latch deeply, but it will take awhile for baby's mouth to grow and baby to get stronger.

    So, when and how long should I pump to boost supply? I've noticed that my daughter wants to nurse and will be content after nursing but then want to eat again within 30 minutes or an hour. If I pump right after she finishes then my letdown takes forever when she wants to eat again and she isn't patient enough to stay latched. She gets angry. Nursing her on demand is not increasing my supply. I don't want to have to feed formula and would like to continue nursing her exclusively, but I can't do that by just nursing her frequently. Also, there are times where she is really demanding and wants to eat tons but then there are times where she sleeps for over 3 hours and I have to wake her up. If I follow her cues I don't get in the 10-12 times a day nursing. although when she eats back and forth on the breast over and over and over for over an hour does that count as just ONE nursing session or multiple ones?

    Just need to boost my supply and keep it up until she can latch more deeply and effectively. Please help me figure out the best way to pump to increase supply.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    48

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    Hang in there. I know how draining it is to have low milk supply. My DD is 13 weeks now.

    For me I followed advice I found on the forum. A two week "boot camp" of boosting supply:

    *Pump after every feeding for 10-20 minutes even at night. My goal was 6-8 pumps per day. The night ones were the easiest to get in since the house was quiet.
    *Reglan and fenugreek
    *Pumped breast milk or formula placed into tube/syringe as provided by my IBCLC. (Similar to SNS.)
    *Frequent weight checks by my IBCLC
    By 6 weeks old we had graduated from supplementing except while I am away at work.

    Perhaps you can find a supplement that doesn't cause gas.
    I hope this helps. =)

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    24

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    I cannot take Reglan or Fenugreek. I took Reglan with my third child and my baby and I both had a terrible reaction to it. We were shaking and anxious and jittery. Baby would NOT sleep at all. It was horrible. I already stated that Fenugreek causes me diarrhea, uterine cramps and nausea. It also causes diarrhea in baby. So I cannot take it anymore.

    Okay, so if I pump after her feeding for 20 minutes and she wants to eat 10 minutes after I pump then do I supplement? My letdown will take FOREVER if I feed her that soon after pumping and she won't be patient enough to stay latched and nurse and wait for it. She is eating non-stop. She is never satisfied at the breast. It takes over and hour to hour and a half switch feeding for her to finally be satisfied and not scream when the boob isn't in her mouth. Most of the time she is screaming on the breast too because the milk isn't there. She sleeps a lot at the breast and I think that is because she is exhausted trying to get the milk that isn't there. Once she does finally appear satisfied and will sleep she is usually awake again within an hour to eat again. I just don't know when to fit in pumping and feeding her since she eats so often.

    Also, at night is the worst. Supposedly most women make more milk at night, but that is when she will not quit nursing. She will cluster feed for HOURS and still not seem satisfied. I just want sleep so I give up and supplement just so she will sleep. Even then she doesn't sleep for more than an hour possibly two if I'm lucky.

    Just getting very frustrated with the amount of nursing I'm doing and the circus hoops I'm having to jump through to try and keep her satisfied. I have three other kids and I don't have someone here to help me do everything. I have to feed myself and kids, take a shower, help my children with odds and ends, etc. I know that everyone on here is very pro-nursing and nurse, nurse, nurse, no matter what, but I don't see how that is realistic when I have to take care of myself and other children.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    504

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    I'm sorry this has been a struggle. You're really persistent and doing a great job. Be kind and gentle with yourself, no matter what.
    Blessed with DS - born 9/2/09 - nursed/pumped for 12 months
    Blessed with DD - born 3/27/12 my dreamfeeder

    903 ounces donated.
    http://www.wakemed.org/landing.cfm?id=135

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    48

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*kadyns.mom View Post

    Okay, so if I pump after her feeding for 20 minutes and she wants to eat 10 minutes after I pump then do I supplement?
    How are you supplementing? With a bottle or SNS/Tube syringe?

    Did your IBCLC tell you how much to supplement? That was my case. My LC did the weigh in's and told me we were short 1/2 to 1 oz each feeding which we did with the tube/syringe. Supplement with an SNS 8x per day so that your nipples are still getting stimulated. Plus it is twice as fast as BF then bottle feeding.

    So basically I would feed with an SNS (supplement included), Pump, then comfort nurse if needed.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    24

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    I don't have a clue how much milk she gets at a feeding. When I went to the lactation consultant, she was a week old. The LC weighed her naked and then had me nurse. She wouldn't latch onto my left breast. She ate on the right and was satisfied. She pooped while feeding. When we weighed her again, the LC said she only took in 5ml from the right breast only feed. She was baffled and said that couldn't be right. She said she sat and watched her eat and heard her sucking and swallowing and said she didn't feel that was correct. Then she said that because my daughter pooped it wasn't accurate. Her losing that stool weight would affect the overall weight. I have not gone back to do a before and after feeding weigh in. So, I'm not sure how much to supplement.

    Oddly enough, my daughter wants to eat non stop in the middle of the night. Apparently most women make more milk in the middle of the night, but my baby is not satisfied at the breast in the middle fo the night. It appears I make LESS at night than during the day. She is content after nursing during the day and will sleep long stretches (I have been waking her up every 21/2 hours), but not in the middle of the night. I've tried giving her 1 oz of formula in a bottle before nursing and then nursing and then 1 oz of formula after nursing and she will still act like she is starving. I try to end at the breast if I can. In the middle of the night it seems I can't satisfy her at all.

    I've only been supplementing if she appears to still be hungry and I can't satisfy her. I figure if she gets hungry 20 minutes after eating and I put her back at the breast then I'm stimulating more milk...however, that doesn't seem to be working to increase my milk. If I do supplement her she will sleep way longer than 21/2 hours and sometimes doesn't want to eat when I wake her up. So, I'm just trying to figure out the balance of feeding her and pumping and having enough available when she wants to eat again. It is kinda tricky.

    So, should I supplement at every feed? I figure if she is happy with what I'm giving her then I shouldn't supplement. But if I choose to not supplement every feed and pump afterward and then she wants to eat very soon I won't have the milk to satisfy her and will have to supplement. I'm stressing about this too much and I'm sure that is affecting my milk. I wish someone could say...feed her at 7am, supplement 1oz, pump 20 minutes. At 8am pump 20 minutes. At 9:30am feed baby, supplement 1oz, pump 20 minutes, at 10:30am pump 20 minutes, etc. Just need some sort of schedule/routine to go by. I know it won't be exact, but need to know what kind of pumping structure I should be following.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    48

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*kadyns.mom View Post
    I don't have a clue how much milk she gets at a feeding.

    So, should I supplement at every feed?
    Sounds like you have some good questions for an IBCLC. I would want to know how short your supply is. I seen on a different thread that WIC does feed/weights too.

    BTW I had the WORST stomach flu for 2 days on 3 separate occasions with a particular brand of fenugreek when I took more than one capsule. (Took me a while to figure out the culprit). I have no troubles with Motherlove brand.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,900

    Default Re: Pumping to increase supply

    It would be my suggestion to not follow up pumping and supplementation plan that was designed for someone else. If I understand correctly your signs that you have low milk supply are that your baby was 1 Ounce shy of birthweight at two weeks and that you are concerned about the babies behavior and I understand you found your baby was not pooping enough but i I am confused about that Green poops alone do not indicate baby has not gotten enough unless they are extremely scant as well Green can be a normal poop color. But whether you have low supply, normal supply, or oversupply the way to increase supply is frequent and effective milk removal from the breasts. Babies in general are more effective at removing milk from the breast then pumps if your baby is not effective at removing milk from the breasts then that is probably the root of the problem as opposed to low milk supply. Of course poor milk transfer can lead to low milk supply so pumping maybe warranted but the root of the problem still must be Addressed. As far as giving you a specific pumping or supplementing plan, while suggestions could be made I fear what you're asking for is so specific that it borders on medical advice. I would suggest the book making more milk I would suggest the many articles about low supply increasing milk production and how milk production works on the website Kelly mom.com and getting a plan from your lactation consultant we're your pediatrician both of whom have seen your baby and have a better understanding of how severe the supply and weight gain issue is and what contributing factors there may or may not be.
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; August 1st, 2012 at 03:47 PM.

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