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Thread: Fussy period at night

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Default Fussy period at night

    My daughter is a month old today and breastfeeding has been going pretty well. Lately we've been having a weird issue at night. She still sleeps a lot during the day and tends to do the majority of her eating at night. Starting around 8-9pm she'll nurse and usually want to eat for the next few hours. She doesn't suck that whole time, but she'll pull off for a few minutes, go on, pull off. For the past couple nights she'll suck for a few minutes, pull off, then she'll start flailing around at the nipple like she can't find it or something. She will do this for a while and gets REALLY frustrated. I know that I have milk, so its not a drying out issue. Does anyone else's baby do this? She is a really good baby, she never cries other than when she does this and when she's hungry. She spits up a lot but she never acts fussy when she spits up, so I don't think that's the problem either. Its just weird how she flails around like that.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Default Re: Fussy period at night

    Also, is it wrong that I feed her every time she gets fussy? The only time she EVER gets fussy is when she starts rooting around like she's hungry. Sometimes this happens every 30 minutes, sometimes its every hour. My husband think I'm overfeeding her because I offer her my breast every time she fusses. If she's rooting then she's obviously hungry, right? I just hope I'm not overfeeding her, at her last appointment she had gained 12oz in one week.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    21,267

    Default Re: Fussy period at night

    Fussy evenings are textbook normal with a month-old baby. They are a developmental stage, and have nothing to do with nursing or with something you're doing/not doing. Count yourself lucky that you're only getting a few hours of fussiness, and that your baby will nurse through it, albeit with that on-and-off, flailing behavior. A lot of babies will scream bloody blue murder for hours on end, and many of them refuse to nurse during that time.
    Here are some strategies that can help you through evening fussiness:
    - Nurse. As much as possible!
    - Calm house. Lights, tv, and stereo down or off.
    - White noise. Status on the radio or the sound of the vacuum running.
    - Warm bath.
    - Fresh air. Take baby outside for a change of scenery.
    - Motion. Rock in a rocker, bounce on an exercise ball, stroll in a stroller, car ride, swing.
    - Closeness. Snuggle baby close in a sling.

    You cannot overfeed a breastfed baby at the breast, so your husband can stop worrying about that. The reason breastfed babies don't get overfed is that the baby is in charge of the feeding. The moment the baby is no longer hungry, her suckling will become gentle and slow, and as a consequence the milk flow will slow to a trickle or stop. This is totally different from how babies eat when given a bottle. When a baby is bottle-fed, the adult is in charge of the feeding, and even the most sensitive bottle-feeding parent will tip a bottle up to get baby to hurry the feeding along or finish the bottle. Also, the bottle delivers the same rapid flow regardless of whether the baby is sucking for comfort or for nutrition. A baby who is comfort-sucking on a bottle will get the same fast flow of milk as she did when she was sucking for food, and she will choke if she doesn't swallow.

    It's normal for breastfed babies to feed very frequently, since unlike bottle-fed babies they tend to take in small amounts of milk more often, and because infant tummies are very tiny, and because breastmilk digests very fast.

    If you're concerned that your baby is growing too fast and will end up fat, you don't need to be. Breastfed babies oftenngain weight very rapidly in their first few weeks/months, but they slow down around the middle of their first year as they become more mobile and start devoting more calories to action (reaching, rolling, kicking, crawling, etc.) instead of packing them on as fat.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    5,761

    Default Re: Fussy period at night

    Agree with mommal as usual. For this:
    For the past couple nights she'll suck for a few minutes, pull off, then she'll start flailing around at the nipple like she can't find it or something. She will do this for a while and gets REALLY frustrated.
    What about trying different positions? laid back helps with this kind of thing alot, but anything different may help. http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfeeding.pdf and www.biologicalnurturing.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    183

    Default Re: Fussy period at night

    Totally agree with mommal. My DD is 6 weeks and has gone through this already - and it won't be the last time as there are many growth spurts (7-10days, 3 wks, 6wks, 3months, 6months etc). Plus if you've already had relfux with LO1 and you're sure it's not that you don't really have anything to worry about. As pp's have said keep nursing when your LO is rooting, keep the atmosphere a clam one when she is fussing and you'll get through it. It doesn't tend to last long, thankfully!

    HTH
    x
    -Ishy-

    Married 28 july 2005
    Mummy to my DS , born 30 july 2008
    proud to have BF him for 8 months
    Now a Mummy for the 2nd time to my DD , born 15 june 2012 for 15 1/2months! Still whenever we can and

    DS Stats
    Birth: 7lbs 15oz - 19.5inches
    4 yrs: 35lbs 4oz - 3feet 5.5inches
    5 yrs: 40lbs - 3feet 8inches

    DD Stats
    Birth: 7lbs 13oz - 19.5inches
    6.5 months 12lbs 14oz - 26inches
    9 months 15lbs 13oz
    15months 20lbs 11oz - 30 inches

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    12

    Default Re: Fussy period at night

    My first didn't have reflux, so I'm honestly not sure WHAT it is. I nurse while laying down with her, she lays across my chest. She did it again last night for about an hour, she would get so upset and just start screaming. My husband walked around with her and rocked her for a few minutes to calm her down, she finally ate calmly and went to sleep. I am just exhausted, it upsets me because I don't know why she is acting that way.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,267

    Default Re: Fussy period at night

    If this is the first time you've experienced colicky behavior, it's got to be very upsetting. I found it absolutely nerve-wracking with my first baby, but not so much with my second because I already knew what to expect and also that it would eventually pass. The reason babies fuss or act colicky in the evenings is not well understood. Some people think it's neurological overload, some think it's trapped gas, others focus on the possibility of food intolerance... But no-one really knows why it happens! For whatever reason, many, many babies go through an intensely fussy period between 3 weeks and 3 months, with the peak usually occurring around 6 weeks, and symptoms generally completely gone by 6 months.

    Again: don't blame yourself, because you didn't cause this. This is just a normal stage.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

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