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Thread: Sudden onnset of no milk

  1. #1

    Default Sudden onnset of no milk

    I have a 3 month old daughter and have been BF just fine. I drink plenty of water and eat well and still take my prenatal vitamins. Today, nursed without any
    issues and my supply plentiful, but for some UNKNOWN reason my baby started
    crying because my milk wasn't coming in fast enough. Again never been an
    issue. This went on for 40 min. she didn't suck long enough for my milk to
    let down and I'm assuming my milk didn't let down due to the fact that I was also stressing over this. I manually expressed milk and barely had any.
    I'm really confused and frustrated and hoping that I am not drying out.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    20,965

    Default Re: Sudden onnset of no milk

    Milk doesn't just dry up for no reason. As long as you are nursing on demand, not supplementing with formula, not pregnant, and not taking a new form of hormonal contraception, what you're experiencing is almost certainly a normal adjustment to supply and not your supply vanishing. Most moms start out making milk in excess of their babies' needs. This is nature's way of making absolutely certain that babies get fed while they master the tricky art of nursing, but in the long run you don't want to be making extra milk because it's a waste of energy and puts you at increased risk of plugged ducts and mastitis. Nursing on demand allows supply to adjust to the right level, and when it does, the following are all normal:
    - reduced or absent leaking
    - reduced or absent letdown sensation
    - feeling "empty", and never feeling "full" or engorged unless baby skips multiple feedings in a row
    - decreased pump output (if pumping), or difficulty expressing by hand
    - baby acts fussy at the breast (she has to adjust to a new flow speed, and must learn to nurse more actively because the milk doesn't just pour out)
    - baby requires both breasts at a feeding even though one was enough in the past
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    middle of IA
    Posts
    1,885

    Default Re: Sudden onnset of no milk

    Hi mama, PP's ideas above are right on.

    I'm guessing it's something else entirely - your DD was in a bad mood, or she's teething, etc. It would be highly bizarre for your milk to suddenly not let down just at one feeding. Next time if this happens, walk around for a few minutes, rock her, then put her back to the breast and try again.

    Hang in there!
    DS1 6/7/11
    DS2 10/29/13

    Nursing, pumping, cloth-diapering, babywearing, working professor mama with the awesomest SAHD ever.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern Cal.
    Posts
    4,984

    Default Re: Sudden onnset of no milk

    A lot of women feel like their supply is "going away" at about three or four months, when really it's just leveling out (i.e., you no longer have oversupply). It's common to feel less "let down" sensations as time goes on, and it's possible your baby was just having a fussy moment. I would just take a deep breath and try again later. Really, I think it's just fine.


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Sudden onnset of no milk

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    Milk doesn't just dry up for no reason. As long as you are nursing on demand, not supplementing with formula, not pregnant, and not taking a new form of hormonal contraception, what you're experiencing is almost certainly a normal adjustment to supply and not your supply vanishing. Most moms start out making milk in excess of their babies' needs. This is nature's way of making absolutely certain that babies get fed while they master the tricky art of nursing, but in the long run you don't want to be making extra milk because it's a waste of energy and puts you at increased risk of plugged ducts and mastitis. Nursing on demand allows supply to adjust to the right level, and when it does, the following are all normal:
    - reduced or absent leaking
    - reduced or absent letdown sensation
    - feeling "empty", and never feeling "full" or engorged unless baby skips multiple feedings in a row
    - decreased pump output (if pumping), or difficulty expressing by hand
    - baby acts fussy at the breast (she has to adjust to a new flow speed, and must learn to nurse more actively because the milk doesn't just pour out)
    - baby requires both breasts at a feeding even though one was enough in the past
    I also support what above said. It is right after 3 or 4 months the supply of milk decreases. you should think positive and try again to nurse your child.

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