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Thread: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

  1. #1
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    Default Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    Ok, I think I've figured out whats bothering my little one ... Problem is, I don't know how to fix it

    I have a 5 and a 1/2 week old, born @ 39 weeks - 7 lbs 6 oz - As of yesterday weighed 11 lbs 7 oz so a 4 lb gain - Which is great but my oversupply is making him extremely gassy and uncomfortable.

    He will arch his back and clench his fist, pull his legs up and cry as he strains to pass gas. A lot does come out but it's obvious not enough to alleviate his pain. The only thing that comforts him is to let him nurse, which I do (if he's awake, he won't go more than 20-30 mon before crying/nursing again)... And when he's done, he's crying and trying to pass gas all over again.

    How can I allow him to comfort nurse as much as he wants without feeding him so much that it upsets his tummy? It's a catch 22 in my opinion ... In pain so he nurses only to make him be in even more pain

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    By the way, stools are normal in color/texture - Rarely spits up, but does cough/gulp/choke during letdown which I have several per feeding since he nurses for so long - hours at a time and he's done this non-stop since about a week old. I've tried block feeding - problem is, with so many letdowns per "feeding" it seems he's getting just as much whether I allow him to nurse from the other breast or not. When he does start gulping at letdown, I take him off and express a little bit out before latching him back on - literally sprays everywhere but not sure how much to express before putting him back on ?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    I had to give a tummy massage then bicycle my son's legs to help him with gas between every single feeding. A warm bath followed by more leg bicycling helped when things were really bad.

    If your baby is patient enough, I would just take him off at letdown and let the milk spray into a towel until the spraying stops. I wouldn't actively express at all if possible. Pumping in particular can exacerbate OALD and OS.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    Thanks .. Yeah, if he's not crying at diaper changes I do give him the gas/colic massage which he seems to enjoy and he does usually pass a little gas. How can I allow him to comfort nurse and not take in a lot of milk with so many letdowns? By just pulling him off for a min you think that would help?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    I think you probably have more OALD (overactive letdown) than oversupply, per se. So I wouldn't necessarily recommend block feeding, etc. Try reclined nursing, spraying into a towel as PP mentioned, and burp the baby frequently, bicycle the legs, etc. The fact that your baby has normal stools says your supply is actually pretty okay - your baby isn't getting way too much foremilk like you often see with OS. So I don't think you need to block feed (although it's fine to offer only one side at a time if your baby is happy with that). Also, if your baby wants to nurse, I would let him - if he wants to comfort nurse and will stay latched on, great, let him. If comfort nursing isn't working out because your flow is too strong, you can try other means of comforting (rocking, shushing, etc.). Some moms use a pacifier under these circumstances, but that's a personal choice (my older baby never took to a pacifier, and my little teeny one seems to be okay with the amount of comfort nursing she's getting).


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    The doctor said the fact that he had gained 4 lbs in 5 weeks (really 5 if you start from what he had lost at the hospital prior to going home) suggests he's eating more then normal. Which he is abnd I'm ok with the weight gain but I would agree it's on the high side of what most EVF babies gain. I know EBF babies gain more than FF babies and then it starts to taper off ... But 5 lbs? That alone doesn't say I may be producing quite a bit? Not disagreeing just trying to figure out how to ease LOs gas pains

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    Oh and he won't take a pacifier. I have a drawer full of various ones and he won't take any of them. I'm doing everything people have suggested so far .. Baths,massages, etc .. But only helps for literally 10 min until hes crying in pain again

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    Well, it sounds like you have AMPLE milk production, and probably overactive letdown, at least. But if baby's poops are yellow and seedy, to me that suggests that your baby is not suffering from the effects of a SEVERE oversupply, anyway. The main way to address oversupply is to block feed, but we usually tell moms to block feed until their baby's stools look yellow and seedy again, and you're already there, you know?


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing

    P.S. Joe was a lot like your baby, and just packed on the pounds in his early months. He was in the 90th-something percentiles for weight until he was seven or eight months old. But that leveled out once he got mobile, and while he's still a big boy, he's not huge anymore (he's in the 75th % for weight). When he was a newborn, he had green frothy poops and lots of gas, but he grew into my supply and was a very very content and happy baby by three months. 5.5 weeks is a notoriously fussy time for a lot of babies. It's actually really normal for a baby this age to fuss and cry a lot, especially in the evenings. Swaddling, baby wearing, shushing, and jiggling up and down can really help. I feel your pain on the pacifier issue, my eldest was really fussy and refused the paci.


    You can call me JoMo!

    Mom to baby boy Joe, born 5/4/09 and breastfed for more than two and a half years, and baby girl Maggie, born 7/9/12.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Oversupply/OALD & Comfort Nursing



    My baby gained 1 pound a week for a few months there. I did have an oversupply, but that gain was actually after the OS has started winding down. I mostly just nursed on one breast per feeding, switching breasts between feedings like PP suggested. I did do some small block (2 hour max) when the engorgement was painfully unbearable and we were seeing some foamy green poops (although they weren't all the time), but that's it. My son's weight leveled off after he started getting around really well, and he's quite proportional now; so I wouldn't worry too much about rapid weight gain.

    I also completely agree that nursing in a reclined position is a really good idea. Honestly that helped my son far more than the block feeding, which mostly helped me with my terrible engorgement.

    I think it is worth trying some of the suggested tricks to help with the gas along with avoiding any pumping before you worry about block feeding. A lot of moms produce extra milk early on, but that naturally levels off after awhile. If I wasn't seeing foamy green poops, I personally wouldn't block feed.

    ETA: My son took a pacifier, but only because he refused to comfort nurse, thanks to the OALD, for much of his infancy. I think the fact that your baby wants to comfort nurse is probably a good sign that he is doing pretty well with the flow.
    Last edited by @llli*phi; July 24th, 2012 at 12:37 PM.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

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