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Thread: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Default 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Hi moms! This is my first post on this forum, and I greatly appreciate the forthcoming advice

    My little baby girl is turning 2 months old this Friday and I had some concerns about bfing. We are EBF, her birth weight was 6lb (lowest was 5lb15oz), and at 1 month she weighed 8lb14oz. Her next check-up is on Friday.

    I am dealing with OALD (since about 5 wks I think?) but it is getting better. However, I wanted to know if this will ever go away? My milk lets down so forcefully that it is painful. I've gotten used to the pain, but it is upsetting when DD refuses to nurse after only 5 minutes. She used to be a great nurser in the beginning, we had a great start, and nursing was so relaxing to me. Now it is cause for stress and seems like an athletic event as other moms have described. I used to pump in order to get a good supply of frozen milk for when I return to work in October, but I am no longer pumping after reading on this forum and other forums that this can exacerbate OALD.

    DD only seems to nurse contentedly/for long periods of time when she is half-asleep, during the evening hours (after her fussy period from 6-7PM), and during the night. Right now, in order to give her a good meal, I am feeding her right when she wakes up so that she doesn't freak out too much from my milk starting to spray.

    I am trying not to look at the clock to gauge how much she has eaten, but I am an engineer and it is hard for me to not quantify how much milk she has taken in. Sometimes she will only gulp for a couple of minutes, unlatch, and then keep pulling off when I try to relatch her. This will usually make her frustrated and cry, so I just give up and soothe her. Last night she nursed for 30 minutes on one side(hooray!!!) but during the entire day I could only get 5 minutes from her each nursing session.

    It makes me worried that she isn't getting enough because she has been getting increasingly fussy and I don't know if this is due to hunger or because she is getting older and fussiness seems pretty normal at this age. I read the "Happiest Baby on the Block" and the 5 S's technique always gets her to go to sleep, but I am worried that she is going to sleep without satisfying her little tummy.

    Her poops/pees are great, sometimes frothy with the poops but they are always yellow.

    When will breastfeeding become a relaxing event that I can look forward to again? I am standing by my decision to EBF, it is what is best for her, but I long for the days when nursing was calming to her.
    Amber

    Mommy to Baby Sage: 6lb, 19in, born on 5/20/12

    love: hotsling AP, bumgenius diapers, ergoBaby
    loving fiancée to SAHD

    visit us at: mommy & sage

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    504

    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Hello and welcome! Congratulation on your little girl.

    I'm sure others will post with additional feedback, but I think that if her diapers and weight gain are good - then everything is fine. (I know, I know - It's hard not nowing how much they are getting).

    It's very possible that she can get a full "meal" in five minutes. My first baby nursed for long period of time. My new baby is all business, and because I also have a little OALD, she really can get full in just a few minutes.

    Hang in there. Babies change so quickly that I'm sure these quirks will end soon. You're doing a great job!

    About the fussiness - I dunno. It's so hard to figure out why they are fussing. Similarly, my DD is going through a phase where she will ONLY nurse when she is sleepy or asleep (late in the evening, overnight, etc.). Sometimes I think after the 2-month mark they "wake up" a little to the world and are fussy about nursing because they don't want to miss what is going on around them. So, during the day try nursing her in a dark room with maybe a little white noise. Or catch her right as she is falling asleep - which is sounds like you're already doing.

    If you do think she's in pain from the OALD, try nursing in a reclined position, or laying down (tummy to tummy). Nursing laying down worked for us quite well around that age.
    Blessed with DS - born 9/2/09 - nursed/pumped for 12 months
    Blessed with DD - born 3/27/12 my dreamfeeder

    903 ounces donated.
    http://www.wakemed.org/landing.cfm?id=135

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    504

    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Sorry about all the typos on my post above
    Blessed with DS - born 9/2/09 - nursed/pumped for 12 months
    Blessed with DD - born 3/27/12 my dreamfeeder

    903 ounces donated.
    http://www.wakemed.org/landing.cfm?id=135

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    OALD either goes away with time, as supply adjusts, or baby grows into the rapid letdowns and they no longer trouble her. You did the right thing by cutting out the pumping. Eventually I am sure you can look forward to relaxing nursing sessions, but don't expect them to be long sessions. Babies who are efficient feeders from very early on don't necessarily ever spend a lot of time just hanging out at the breast.

    Turn the clock to the wall for now: it's not a good gauge of intake. Diaper output and weight gain are better metrics.

    And WRT the fussiness, you nailed it. At this age, fussiness is textbook normal. Don't let it get to you.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Thank you for your replies!! I have been laying down with DD to nurse as much as possible, and that seems to work most of the time unless she is particularly fussy. I haven't quite gotten the hang of reclining while nursing with her on my chest, but sometimes I am able to latch her and then sink back into the couch or chair. That seems to help her out.

    I'm a little sad that she probably won't nurse for long periods of time, even though in the first couple of weeks I was wondering when the marathon nursing sessions would finally end!!

    I'm glad that she is getting weighed on Friday... it seems like my confidence in breastfeeding is restored every time her weight is checked and then it slowly wanes until her next appt... I think that being a FTM and hearing so many stories about failed breastfeeding is the cause of this. It just seems so common that things go wrong, and here I am wanting to breastfeed until she's happy with weaning herself!

    Tonight was an especially difficult night. Usually DD only takes one side per feeding, but i think I've gotten my supply under control where she will soon be needing two sides (we'll see...). Tonight she was eating perfectly on the right side, even made it through the letdown, and then started to turn her head side-to-side while still latched about 10 minutes into the feeding (it didn't hurt me, it was actually kind of funny). I was so happy, I thought she was going to take the other side! She unlatched herself and as I was switching to the left side she started bawling (impatience? night time fussing?) and would not latch. This was pretty disheartening, so I soothed her, she fell asleep for about 15 minutes, and then I fed her on the left side when she woke up.

    As far as supply goes, I will be returning to work in October and was wondering if there was anything I should do to prepare for pumping at work. Basically, I am under the assumption that if my supply is well-matched to her demand that there will not be much milk to pump out. I can get a good amount of milk out with the pump if I am pretty full (4-5 oz total) but I am starting to feel less full as my supply gets under control.

    Thanks again!!
    Amber

    Mommy to Baby Sage: 6lb, 19in, born on 5/20/12

    love: hotsling AP, bumgenius diapers, ergoBaby
    loving fiancée to SAHD

    visit us at: mommy & sage

  6. #6
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    May 2006
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    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*wuvamber View Post
    I'm a little sad that she probably won't nurse for long periods of time, even though in the first couple of weeks I was wondering when the marathon nursing sessions would finally end!!
    Don't rule out the possibility! My second baby had to cope with really fast letdowns and oversupply during her first months. We were doing 5-10 minute feedings from birth on. But now that she's 2 she will hang out and nurse f.o.r.e.v.e.r.!

    I'm glad that she is getting weighed on Friday... it seems like my confidence in breastfeeding is restored every time her weight is checked and then it slowly wanes until her next appt... I think that being a FTM and hearing so many stories about failed breastfeeding is the cause of this. It just seems so common that things go wrong, and here I am wanting to breastfeed until she's happy with weaning herself!
    When things go wrong, there's usually a good reason for it. Most problems with breastfeeding are management issues, not organic issues. So when you hear someone sigh and say "Well, my milk just dried up!" don't feel like that is something that is likely to just happen, or something that is irremediable.

    As far as supply goes, I will be returning to work in October and was wondering if there was anything I should do to prepare for pumping at work. Basically, I am under the assumption that if my supply is well-matched to her demand that there will not be much milk to pump out. I can get a good amount of milk out with the pump if I am pretty full (4-5 oz total) but I am starting to feel less full as my supply gets under control.
    Yes, when supply is well-matched to demand you'll probably not get much milk immediately after feedings, and your pump output will decline in general. 4-5 oz per pump session is a larger than average amount of milk to pump. Don't worry too much, though: when you're pumping at work you will be pumping in place of feedings instead of in addition to feedings, and you should be able to get the right amount of milk. Here's what you should be thinking about, as you plan your return to work:
    - Make sure your daycare provider is familiar with how to feed a breastfed baby. Breastfed babies tend to take smaller amounts of milk more frequently than formula-fed babies, but it's still easy to overfeed when using a bottle. You want your DCP to feed on demand and to use paced feeding techniques. You also want them to try to not give your baby a bottle within a 1/2 hour or even more, depending on your baby, of your arrival at daycare, so that you have a chance to nurse the moment you get your baby back.
    - Make sure you have the right pumping equipment. Good pump, correctly sized shields, car adapter for the pump, and a backup pump just in case you forget yours at home.
    - Talk to the relevant people in your workplace and make sure you have a clean, private place to pump, and the time to do so. You want to have the freedom to pump every 2-3 hours, though you may need a more or less frequent schedule than that.
    - When your supply is a little better matched to baby's demand, start pumping 1x per day and creating a stash for when you go back to work. You want to be a few days ahead, but not so far ahead that your freezer is full before you even head back to work.
    - Make sure your baby will take a bottle- starting at 4-6 weeks. You may need to try different nipples and bottles until you find one your baby likes, so don't buy a whole bunch of one brand. Buy one of each kind and experiment util you find one that works for you.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  7. #7
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    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    Don't rule out the possibility! My second baby had to cope with really fast letdowns and oversupply during her first months. We were doing 5-10 minute feedings from birth on. But now that she's 2 she will hang out and nurse f.o.r.e.v.e.r.!



    When things go wrong, there's usually a good reason for it. Most problems with breastfeeding are management issues, not organic issues. So when you hear someone sigh and say "Well, my milk just dried up!" don't feel like that is something that is likely to just happen, or something that is irremediable.



    Yes, when supply is well-matched to demand you'll probably not get much milk immediately after feedings, and your pump output will decline in general. 4-5 oz per pump session is a larger than average amount of milk to pump. Don't worry too much, though: when you're pumping at work you will be pumping in place of feedings instead of in addition to feedings, and you should be able to get the right amount of milk. Here's what you should be thinking about, as you plan your return to work:
    - Make sure your daycare provider is familiar with how to feed a breastfed baby. Breastfed babies tend to take smaller amounts of milk more frequently than formula-fed babies, but it's still easy to overfeed when using a bottle. You want your DCP to feed on demand and to use paced feeding techniques. You also want them to try to not give your baby a bottle within a 1/2 hour or even more, depending on your baby, of your arrival at daycare, so that you have a chance to nurse the moment you get your baby back.
    - Make sure you have the right pumping equipment. Good pump, correctly sized shields, car adapter for the pump, and a backup pump just in case you forget yours at home.
    - Talk to the relevant people in your workplace and make sure you have a clean, private place to pump, and the time to do so. You want to have the freedom to pump every 2-3 hours, though you may need a more or less frequent schedule than that.
    -
    - Make sure your baby will take a bottle- starting at 4-6 weeks. You may need to try different nipples and bottles until you find one your baby likes, so don't buy a whole bunch of one brand. Buy one of each kind and experiment until you find one that works for you.
    with ALL of this (but I removed the bit about pumping - see more below) and i wanted to add some links that might be helpful

    http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/f...ottle-feeding/
    http://kellymom.com/bf/pumpingmoms/pumping/milkcalc/


    I assume with the earlier pumping you did you already have a small stash of milk? if so plan to use that for your first day and don't bother pumping again until then. that should help with you OALD
    Autumn
    Moma to *Silas* 10-30-07

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post

    Yes, when supply is well-matched to demand you'll probably not get much milk immediately after feedings, and your pump output will decline in general. 4-5 oz per pump session is a larger than average amount of milk to pump. Don't worry too much, though: when you're pumping at work you will be pumping in place of feedings instead of in addition to feedings, and you should be able to get the right amount of milk. Here's what you should be thinking about, as you plan your return to work:
    - Make sure your daycare provider is familiar with how to feed a breastfed baby. Breastfed babies tend to take smaller amounts of milk more frequently than formula-fed babies, but it's still easy to overfeed when using a bottle. You want your DCP to feed on demand and to use paced feeding techniques. You also want them to try to not give your baby a bottle within a 1/2 hour or even more, depending on your baby, of your arrival at daycare, so that you have a chance to nurse the moment you get your baby back.
    - Make sure you have the right pumping equipment. Good pump, correctly sized shields, car adapter for the pump, and a backup pump just in case you forget yours at home.
    - Talk to the relevant people in your workplace and make sure you have a clean, private place to pump, and the time to do so. You want to have the freedom to pump every 2-3 hours, though you may need a more or less frequent schedule than that.
    - When your supply is a little better matched to baby's demand, start pumping 1x per day and creating a stash for when you go back to work. You want to be a few days ahead, but not so far ahead that your freezer is full before you even head back to work.
    - Make sure your baby will take a bottle- starting at 4-6 weeks. You may need to try different nipples and bottles until you find one your baby likes, so don't buy a whole bunch of one brand. Buy one of each kind and experiment util you find one that works for you.
    Great advice! Fortunately my fiance is going to stay at home with DD for the first couple of years and he is already doing great with bottle feeding. We haven't offered her a bottle for a week because I stopped pumping, but we know that she prefers the NUK nipple. I have the Medela Pump-in-style, which is working very well.

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*lidarln
    I assume with the earlier pumping you did you already have a small stash of milk? if so plan to use that for your first day and don't bother pumping again until then. that should help with you OALD
    I have a very good stash of milk in the freezer from the early days of ill-advised pumping... I was wondering, should I thaw a little bit of it every couple of days (maybe like half oz or 1 oz?) and have my fiance feed her a bottle when she isn't too hungry so that she stays used to the bottle? Will she forget how to drink from the bottle? I was thinking that it wouldn't hurt my milk supply if he tries that maybe an hour after a feeding every once in a while, but I wasn't sure. For now, we are putting the pump away and staying away from the bottles!!!!

    Updates: DD has been feeding very well today, no meltdowns due to fast flow. She has only pulled off a couple of times and the worst thing that has happened is that she gets milk sprayed all over her face...
    I have found that the left side is the bigger OALD culprit. If the right side is full then it will spray sometimes but it is much more well-behaved.
    Amber

    Mommy to Baby Sage: 6lb, 19in, born on 5/20/12

    love: hotsling AP, bumgenius diapers, ergoBaby
    loving fiancée to SAHD

    visit us at: mommy & sage

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    I'd keep on offering the bottle every day or two. I have a friend whose baby refused the bottle when she returned to work, and it was just awful for everyone. The baby cried all. day. long. waiting for his mom to come home. It sounds like you're in no danger of reducing your supply too much at this point, so I like your plan of thawing a bit of milk every so often and having your fiancé feed it to the baby. I think that the more she gets the idea that daddy time = bottle time, the better. Just make sure that you return to pumping during skipped feedings, once your supply is more closely aligned with baby's needs.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Default Re: 2 month old: When will it get easier? *long post...*

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*mommal View Post
    I'd keep on offering the bottle every day or two. I have a friend whose baby refused the bottle when she returned to work, and it was just awful for everyone. The baby cried all. day. long. waiting for his mom to come home.
    That would be horrible!! That is probably worst case scenario for me. I'll thaw some milk tonight for him to feed her tomorrow. We never had a problem with the bottle... maybe it has something to do with her being all business when it comes to feeding time.

    Thank you so much for all of your help!!!!!
    Amber

    Mommy to Baby Sage: 6lb, 19in, born on 5/20/12

    love: hotsling AP, bumgenius diapers, ergoBaby
    loving fiancée to SAHD

    visit us at: mommy & sage

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