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Thread: How do I build up a milk supply/storage after delivery?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Henderson, NV
    Posts
    2

    Default How do I build up a milk supply/storage after delivery?

    Hi there!

    I am expecting baby #2 in 3 weeks. I breastfed my first until he was 8 months old and pumped at work for 4 of those months. I felt like breast feeding was successful, but I had NO idea what I was doing as far as pumping went. I had a very old Medela PIS that was lent to me and that I believe was pretty inefficient. I started pumping a couple weeks in advance of working, but really didn't feel like I was pumping enough milk and certainly didn't have a back up supply. What I ended up pumping at work was what I ended up giving the babysitter the next day and it was very stressful.

    I'm looking for advice on how to build up a milk supply so that when I go back to work it's not so stressful. Should I start pumping within weeks of delivery my baby? Should I pump on one breast while I nurse on the other? Help!

    Thank you in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    860

    Default Re: How do I build up a milk supply/storage after delivery?

    congratulations on expecting baby #2.
    there is information on working and breastfeeding located in the Resource section on this website.
    You are doing the right thing by seeking knowledge before the baby is born.
    i know you will make it work out and you will be able to meet/exceed your breastfeeding goals.
    I kind of feel like we learn with our firsts and keep improving our mothering skills.
    DD#1 July 1986 VB
    DD#2 April 1988 c/sec
    DS#3 April 1990 VBAC
    DS#4 June 1993 VB
    and suprise!
    DD#5 April 2001 c/sec
    BTDT scars and stretchmarks,: wrinkles and grey hair

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    21,262

    Default Re: How do I build up a milk supply/storage after delivery?

    I think the way most working moms do it is this:
    - They do nothing but nurse for the first 4-6 weeks, giving the baby the opportunity to become a proficient nurser and to establish mom's milk supply at the right level.
    - After 4-6 weeks, they introduce a bottle, starting with one ore day given (preferably) by someone other than mom. While the baby is getting the bottle, mom pumps to replace it (unless she has severe oversupply, in which case pumping may be optional).
    - Mom chooses one time of day to pump, usually after the first morning feeding when a typical woman has somewhat more milk than usual. The milk from that pumping session goes into the freezer.
    - Mom uses a good pump- not a used pump and not a cheap pump.
    - Ideally, you don't get too far ahead of yourself when it comes to storing milk, and you don't use your stash to routinely supplement what you pump at work. The milk that your baby eats during the workday should be what you pumped at work the day before. If you keep your pumping amounts equivalent to what your baby takes by bottle, then your supply is being maintained at the right level.
    Coolest thing my big girl said recently: "How can you tell the world is moving when you are standing on it?"
    Coolest thing my little girl sang recently: "I love dat one-two pupples!"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,440

    Default Re: How do I build up a milk supply/storage after delivery?

    You only need to really have the first day or two of milk stored, so you just have a bit for the first day and in case your forget your milk or spill it or something. Fresh milk is way, way better than frozen for your baby To build this, some moms do pump me side and nurse the other in the last week or two before returning to work. Really, you don't need hundreds of oz in the freezer before going to work. Most working moms find they just need something like 10-30 oz.

    Your baby should take 1 to 1.5 oz of milk per hour of separation.

    I would suggest spending the money and buying a better pump, first off.

    Secondly, then research how to pump, such as frequency during separations, methods, horn sizes, etc.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

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