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Thread: Too much at night, not enough during the day

  1. #1
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    Jun 2012
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    Default Too much at night, not enough during the day

    I have a 7 week year old boy and up until now feeding has been good. He gained weight well and good amounts of pees and poos. Just a few days ago he started sleeping 5-6 hours at night. I thought this would be so great but then I was waking up so engorged and in a puddle of milk (I now sleep with a towel under me). I used to pump at night but now I stopped so I don't over produce. At night he would only feed off of one breast so I would switch to the other breast the next feeding. It would take about 4 feedings 2-3 hours apart for my breast to get back to normal (from 3am to 12pm). Then the rest of the day (the last 4 feedings) I couldn't produce enough. My LO would latch for a few minutes then cry and scream like he wasn't getting any milk. He wouldn't latch back on long enough to let my milk come in. In the evenings he would feed every 2 hours and my milk doesn't come in until 2.5 hours. Even then he would scream and cry if he doesn't get enough.
    Will my breast regulate? Can they slow down at night and speed up during the day? Should I pump in the eveing to increase production? Has this happened to anyone else?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Too much at night, not enough during the day

    Your milk production will regulate, as in, it will adjust to meet the needs of YOUR baby. Enough, but not too much. The best way to ensure this happens quickly is to nurse frequently and ON CUE (whenever baby cues AND whenever you feel like it.) A minimum of 10 times a day at this age so, 10 times or more-would be a reasonable number of nursing times per 24 hour day, and (as long as baby is gaining well) to NOT pump or give supplemental feedings. You really cannot nurse or offer to nurse too frequently.

    The sleep stretch you describe is probably fine, as long as 1) baby is gaining well and 2) baby is not being kept asleep artificially with overuse of a pacifier or overuse of swaddling. Also you will be more sure not to miss a babies cues at night if you sleep in the same room very close to baby. This is a longish time for a baby to be sleeping at night at only 7 weeks, so do not be surprised if this changes and baby starts waking more frequently again at night. 3 months would be more the typical earliest time for a sleep stretch of this type, but every baby is different and makes his or her own rules.

    What concerns me about your post is that you say you have too much milk at night but not enough during the day. Normally, milk production does vary somewhat during the day, but I very much doubt you actually do not have enough at any time based on your baby’s normal weight gain etc. Babies fuss, on or off the breast, for any number of reasons. I think what may be happening is you have a touch of overproduction and or forceful letdown. (Likely not a huge issue at this age.) When baby is fussy, it could be baby is unhappy with the rapidity of the milk flow. Many babies object more to flow issues when awake than when sleepy, also if you are nursing laying down at night that often makes handling the flow easier for baby. IMPORTANT: You are making milk all the time, so waiting longer between feedings to "fill up" is not only unnecessary, it is actually harmful-one, because it prevents you from cue feeding, and 2) because it can worsen the effects of a fast letdown. Also, if low supply WERE an issue (I do not think it is in your case) nursing more frequently, not less, would be the recommendation.

    At LLL we say, watch the baby, not the clock-in other words, do not schedule feedings and do not time feedings. As long as baby is gaining well & nursing is comfortable for mom, you are doing perfect. When baby is allowed and encouraged to nurse very frequently in the early months on their own pattern, this will avoid many breastfeeding issues.

    PS I leaked at night in the early months and kept a small pile of towels under me, so I could easily strip off a layer and go back to sleep.
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; June 30th, 2012 at 11:31 AM.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Too much at night, not enough during the day


  4. #4
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    Default Re: Too much at night, not enough during the day

    with all of lllmeg's words of wisdom. Fussing at the breast is so super common for young babies. Your body is constantly making milk, so it doesn't take 2.5 hours for your milk to "come in". Your baby probably just needs some help getting comfortable while he is working on getting it. I just wanted to add some things that I did to help my baby stay latched when he would fuss (oh and how he would fuss - literally screaming at the breast):

    1. Nurse in a reclined position (helps with a forceful letdown)
    2. Nurse while in motion (walking with baby, bouncing baby on my knee, rocking baby back and forth)
    3. Nurse in a sling, wrap, or other style carrier
    4. Nurse outside (on a walk in the sling, standing or sitting out on the deck)
    5. Nurse in a nice warm bath
    6. Nurse while singing, or put on music or use white noise
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  5. #5
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    Jun 2012
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    Default Re: Too much at night, not enough during the day

    Thanks for the advice. I do think I have forceful letdown because he shows the signs noted in the article from above. I've now started walking around the house to calm him while I nurse and he doesn't fuss. He is eating more often now but for less time and sometimes just one side. Why does the forceful letdown bother him now and not before? Will the forceful letdown always be a problem or does he get used to it? I've also tried the laid back nursing position and he doesn't like that too much but I'm trying to get him used to it. His weight gain is good he was born at 5lbs 5oz and at 7 weeks he is now 10lbs 6oz. I haven't given him a pacifire yet and I only swaddle him below the arms (he likes his arms free) however last night I just layed a blanket on him to make sure he wasn't too comforatble swaddled and not waking up but he slept for 5.5 hours so I guess he wants to sleep that much. I used to wake him up to nurse but now when I try he won't stay awake to nurse. I'm glad I found this forum it is helpful.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Too much at night, not enough during the day

    Your letdown may just be stronger now than it was before. Try tweaking the reclined position - recline a little more, a little less, put your baby in different places on your stomach or chest, etc. It can take a little work to find something that really clicks, but it is worth it - nursing reclined saved my nursing relationship from overactive letdown! Side lying nursing can help for some mamas too. My son started growing into the fast letdown around 3 months and seemed to be completely fine (no issues at all) with it by 5 months. I had a letdown that would spray the cat sitting on the opposite end of the couch, though; not all overactive letdown is quite that bad.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Too much at night, not enough during the day

    with phi about laid back. Keep tweaking it. And keep doing what you are doing, you and baby are figuring this all out just great! Smart of you to figure out the walking and nursing this does seem to sooth many babies. Frequent nursings, nursing one side at a time, different positons, etc. can all help you get through the forceful letdown time. In the vast majority of cases, this is a temporary problem that gets better as your milk supply regulates properly while at the same time baby gets bigger and can handle the flow better.

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