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Thread: Output while at work

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Output while at work

    Thank you I will try that.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Output while at work

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*phi View Post
    Most women need to pump every 2-3 hours for 15-20 minutes while at work to maintain supply. I was able to get away with pumping 2x at work when I had an oversupply, but needed to pump 3x once my supply evened out. You want to make sure your parts are properly sized for your breasts. Also, membranes or valves (depending on what type of pump you are using) need to be replaced periodically or your pump can lose suction.

    My baby spewed spit up like crazy when he was little. It was sometimes much worse for my son after nursing than it was after bottles too, and I think that may be due to my overactive letdown (but I can't say that with certainty). At any rate, as long as there isn't any pain with the spit up, it's not something that warrants concern.
    Regarding the pump, it's a brand new Medela "hospital grade" pump that WIC gave me. What exactly is "overactive letdown" I've seen that term used in forums, but wasn't sure what it was. My daughter sometimes acts like she is getting too much, and get squirmy and even feels like she is biting me sometimes. Can you do anything to help an overactive letdown?

    She was very crabby and arched her back and cried after I nursed her for the longest time, until I spoke to her pediatrician and she said it was acid reflux and prescribed Zantac for her. That does seem to be helping her, she doesn't seem so uncomfortable anymore.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Shakedown St.
    Posts
    1,176

    Default Re: Output while at work

    Overactive letdown (OALD) is when your milk flows very forcefully when it first starts flowing. Signs include frequent unlatching, loss of suction, choking, sputtering, clicking, and/or gulping at the breast. Fussiness at the breast can be due to OALD, but can also be due to many other reasons as well. Excessive gassiness and spit up often accompany OALD as well. Reflux is often confused with OALD.

    If you suspect you are having problems associated with OALD, then you can nurse in a reclined position. I woud lean back on a few pillows, put my baby on my stomach or chest, and let him latch. It takes tweaking positioning a bit to find something that works for you, but it is really great for OALD. Gravity helps slow the flow of the milk making it more manageable for the baby.

    Babies also naturally handle the OALD better as they grow bigger. I sprayed milk halfway across the room for 15 months, but my son was only bothered by it for the first 3 months. After that, I really didn't need to worry about nursing reclined so much.

    He was always gassy though and I just needed to help him work that out periodically throughout the day. Tummy massage then bicycling his legs between feedings helped a lot, then warm baths in the evenings.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Output while at work

    That makes a lot of sense..it sounds like OALD may be my problem. I had a spinal headache for 13 days after she was born via c/s and I could only lay flat and never had a problem (Or as I do at night lay on my side and BF her) and she does just fine. So I am going to try the reclined feeding and see if that helps. Great recommendation, thank you!

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