Happy Mothers Breastfed Babies
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32

Thread: Finding "normalcy."

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    @pennysmommy - I am right there with you! 6 weeks in and still wondering how I'll be able to DO everything. My guy sleeps well too but is a fast eater, and he's been going longer during the day (sometimes) BUT he cannot nap long without touching someone. If you hold him, he'll sleep for an hour or more, but if you lay him down...eyes open immediately! Or maybe after 20-30 minutes. And then he gets cranky because he's tired. It's hard when you feel tethered to this little person, and I get a bit overwhelmed thinking about my old routine and how will I be able to schedule clients when I start back up at work (I'm a personal trainer). I'm trying to focus on one day at a time. We can do it!
    Becky

    Mommy to Owen b. 4/20/12

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    860

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    Greetings pennysmommy!
    You came to the right place for information and support for all your breastfeeding questions.
    That's what I love about la Leche League. Youwill meet other women who can completely relate to your situation.
    here comes my 2 cents worth... If you are exclusively breastfeeding and not giving your LO pacifiers.. a breastfeeding session should be with in a comfortable range of 10 -20 minutes give or take the time of day and frequency of feeding.
    my Lo's used to take a one hour marathon nursing session at about 7 pm. But that was only once a day.
    Good milk transfer usually occurs when a baby is suckling correctly and usually does not take an hour once your baby gets the hang of it. By 6 weeks your day should begin to have a rhythm and dare I say the word schedule, no I mean predictability.
    If you are unhappy having your baby nurse for an hour per feeding you might want to visit an IBCLC for a pre-feed and post feed weigh in after 20 minutes to calculate your milk transfer.
    Speaking from experience an hour per feeding every time is not optimal milk transfer.
    DD#1 July 1986 VB
    DD#2 April 1988 c/sec
    DS#3 April 1990 VBAC
    DS#4 June 1993 VB
    and suprise!
    DD#5 April 2001 c/sec
    BTDT scars and stretchmarks,: wrinkles and grey hair

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    3,319

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    Until my son was about 8 weeks old, feedings took an hour or so, but as he grew they got much faster; I'd say by the time he was 3-4 months old it was closer to 15-20 minutes total. Be patient and hang in there--it will get faster as baby grows.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    COUGARTOWN Baby! From here on in!
    Posts
    17,425

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    I don't think that true at all Estervegan. I think at 6weeks babies go through growth spurts AND will be tethered to their mother all day. Marathon nursing sessions for all growth spurts AND COMPLETELY normal for babies that young to graze all day. I don't think this New mother needs to panic about milk transfer. I think she needs to get used to the idea that her newborn needs her AND access to her boobs at all times. That is a little overwhelming. But she will probably be able to breathe in the next few weeks here.

    Way too lazy for formula

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,307

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    Part of that might be because it takes my DD an hour per feeding (LC says she's just a slow eater and likes to be "thorough" with her meals) and eats just about every 2 hours during the day. My nipples are sore almost all the time and sometimes my breasts are sore after a feeding (but not always). Night engorgement is annoying and I don't like having to wear nursing pads everyday nor do I like having to ignore most of my wardrobe and spend money on new pieces because not everything wears for easy access.
    I have to dissagee a bit that it is normal to have so much nipple/breast soreness at this point. Nipple soreness is an indicator of a not perfect latch, not that baby nurses "too long" or too often, as there is really no such thing at this age. And if you are nursing baby regularly throughout the day and night, as is generally needed at this age, engorgement usually will go away by about this time (many moms don't ever even get engorged) unless a mom has oversupply, and your baby hanging out at the breast so long does not indicate oversupply...Engorgement not only can make latch more difficult for baby, (and thus more painful for mom) it can lead to plugged ducts and other painful effects.

    So I am just wondering if you have played around with positioning and latch techniques and what you have tried, also what healing methods (creams, soothies, etc) you are using for your sore nipples. Also if baby is taking a long sleep time at night, how long. A long stretch of not nursing at night may be exacerbating the issues at this point.

    Also some moms find breast compressions can help with shortening really long feedings: http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=...tion&Itemid=17

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,564

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*djs.mom View Post
    I don't think that true at all Estervegan. I think at 6weeks babies go through growth spurts AND will be tethered to their mother all day. Marathon nursing sessions for all growth spurts AND COMPLETELY normal for babies that young to graze all day. I don't think this New mother needs to panic about milk transfer. I think she needs to get used to the idea that her newborn needs her AND access to her boobs at all times. That is a little overwhelming. But she will probably be able to breathe in the next few weeks here.
    I was a bit shocked to see the 10 to 20 minute limit there myself, esthervegan. Oh how those book had me doubting myself with that time limit nonsense! Lilah would nurse for 45 minutes straight, then want to nurse on the other side for 45 minutes and then need to nurse again 15 or 20 minutes later. Around the clock. For the first 6 or 8 weeks.
    Tracie

    Mommy to
    Lilah 10/08 nursed 25 months
    Beatrix 01/11 nursed 30 months

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    Estervegan--

    A little background on my lo:

    She was born 2 weeks early and a little jaundice which caused her to be very very sleepy... all the time. Combined with the lack of advice on BF from the hospital, she didn't eat much the first 48hr. The first day home, I went to see a lactation consultant and saw her 3 times that week. She lost weight, but we determined it was because my milk hadn't come in yet, and when it did, my supply was low. Through pumping and feeding pumped milk combined with nursing, her weight shot up. I rarely give her bottles, but there have been a handful of times when I have. Since she's been gaining weight, I've seen the consultant about once a week with weigh ins. It seems it does take her an hour to get what she needs. She sucks then waits, sucks and waits. As the consultant says, she's just a slow eater. I'm not worried about this being a problem, it's just an exhausting, needed part of my mommyhood.


    lilmeg--

    I've tried a few positions and have found the cradle works best for us (with the help of the lactation consultant). The left side is a little more painful than the right, but usually just in the first couple of seconds. She also tends to buck back and pull, which I think might indicate the need to burp (she pulls off after yanking and when I pat her back, she burps... sometimes spits up.) I've tried lanolin cream which helps, but my nipples don't look cracked or bruised. A week ago, I did have a blister, but that has healed up. As far as engorgement goes, she's recently started sleeping 6-8 hours and I wake up at the 6 hr ark feeling very full. Twice, I've pumped to relieve the pressure and stored it in the freezer in case I might need it at a later time. Thanks for your concern!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Middle of nowhere in Ohio
    Posts
    121

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    I can relate to how you are feeling. I left my full time job when I had my second daughter to stay home full time. I really felt like all I did all day was feed her. I felt guilty for not contributing to the house, or how I felt I wasn't contributing. Some days I disliked breastfeeding because I had another child to take care of and things to do, but I reminded myself that one day I will look down and she won't want to nurse anymore and those days will be over. It made the experience more memorable and helped me treasure those moments intead of looking at the clock wondering when she would be done. Hang in there.... it does get easier.
    Passed my CLC exam!

    Mother of 3: 12-25-04 12-3-07 1-13-2011

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    5,307

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    lilmeg--

    I've tried a few positions and have found the cradle works best for us (with the help of the lactation consultant). The left side is a little more painful than the right, but usually just in the first couple of seconds. She also tends to buck back and pull, which I think might indicate the need to burp (she pulls off after yanking and when I pat her back, she burps... sometimes spits up.) I've tried lanolin cream which helps, but my nipples don't look cracked or bruised. A week ago, I did have a blister, but that has healed up. As far as engorgement goes, she's recently started sleeping 6-8 hours and I wake up at the 6 hr ark feeling very full. Twice, I've pumped to relieve the pressure and stored it in the freezer in case I might need it at a later time. Thanks for your concern!
    I suggest trying laid back positioning. You can still hold baby in a cradle hold, you can hold baby in any position in laid back, some moms find it works best to latch baby first and then relax back. Also you can be reclined as much or as little as you like (but not flat on your back.)

    Laid back allows gravity to work for you by keeping baby securely on the breast and nipple. This seems to help a great deal with issues such as latch pain, flailing, and pulling as you describe. It is also a very comfortable position for mom. It takes some practice and may feel awkward at first that is norrmal.

    I also suggest bring baby to the breast during the night at least once to avoid engorgement and help baby get more milk overall. Baby need not even wake much, babies can and do nurse in thier sleep. At this age such a long sleep stretch could be fine, although a bit out of the ordinary. (A more typical sleep pattern would be for baby to start having a stretch of 5 hours or so at around 3 months of age, but babies certainly can run the gamut with this.) But since you are still experiencing engorgement at night and very long nursing sessions during the day, that indicates to me it may be a tad too early for such a long stretch at night.

    Lanolin & other nipple creams are barrier creams that keep your own moisture in to promote healing & prevent cracking and drying. You do not need to be visibly injured for them to help. Lately I have heard of more and more moms using coconut oil on mysteriously sore nipples with good results. Breastmilk left on the nipples often helps too.

    More on laid back: http://www.llli.org/docs/00000000000...astfeeding.pdf and http://www.biologicalnurturing.com/ (esp. watch the video)
    Last edited by @llli*lllmeg; June 4th, 2012 at 02:35 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Finding "normalcy."

    Thank you, lilmeg!

    I'm actually trying to nurse laid back right now. Sitting in the couch, reclined with her in the cradle. So far so good. We shall see what happens when she's done! I haven't heard of coconut oil being used, but if they continue to hurt, I may pick some up at the store tomorrow. Can't hurt to try, right? As far as sleeping goes, I've had 2 doctors applaud me for it (as if I have complete control over my daughter's sleep patterns! and they tell me to let her sleep and enjoy it. I think if I wake up feeling engorged, I'm going to try your suggestion and get her to nurse a little,

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •