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Thread: Thinking about EPing

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    I also pumped too soon because I went back to work part time very early on, but then I ended up just nursing the baby at work and was . I do think pumping too early drove my oversupply too.

    with everything joe.s.mom said. Backing off the pump and block feeding will help. Work out any clogs and be on the lookout for signs of infection. I used to massage my breasts in the shower to work out clogs. A warm shower seemed to be the most effective means of loosening the clogs for me. Milk would spray all over the place. I took a lot of showers back then for that reason alone.

    It might help to keep working on laid back nursing. It took us awhile to get it down. Recline a little more or a little less. Switch around the position of the baby on your stomach or chest. In the beginning, I was even sort of holding my baby over the nipple and lowering him down as he latched.

    Be patient. All of these things can take some time to work. Oversupply can wax and wane as you head toward improvement. But it does get better, and sticking with it is so worth it in the end. You can do this!
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  2. #12
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    Mar 2006
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    I was given the exact same advice by a nurse in the hospital, after I was transferred there postpartum, and by our ped. Horrible advice for a mom who has normal to excessive supply. I struggled for a long time with oversupply, but I didn't have anybody knowledgeable telling me to not pump and how to control the OS
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  3. #13

    Default Re: Thinking about EPing



    Oh, mama, I really feel for you. Please look at my posts and Susan's (aprilsmagic) about the whole experience. I don't want to minimize what your'e going through and unfortunately I have no advice for you on how to make it better, but I truly wish I had been in your place 20 months ago. I really believe that if you take the BTDT advice of the other mamas your body will adjust and you will have a wonderful long breastfeeding relationship with your daughter. You'll figure out the things you need to tweak in your diet to make you both comfortable. Truly, I guarantee you won't regret it.

    I'm sorry, but I'm really mourning the fact that I wasn't able to get the hang of BFing my daughter and I'm feeling horribly guilty about stopping pumping almost 2 weeks ago. Like ready to go to my storage area this afternoon and get the pump that I couldn't actually part with out and use it again. Really, EPing is a horrible experience. Please don't go that way, you really will regret it.
    Marley & Emily 9-24-10
    (Done as of 5-23-12)

  4. #14

    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    I came across this thread by accident, saw the largely negative responses to the idea of exclusively pumping, and felt it might help if I share my experience, which has been a positive one.

    I have been exclusively pumping for nearly 4 months so far (and counting) after directly feeding my baby sadly did not work out, despite weeks of intensive effort, blood and excruciating pain.

    The pumping does require diligence and dedication, but then so does direct breastfeeding.

    I enjoy that I can go out for a couple of hours while my baby's dad or granny spends quality time with her, and leave bottles of my milk for her to have on demand even in my absence.

    I have also been able to donate a lot of extra milk to a local milk bank for sick infants who don't have access to mother's milk - whatever is excess to my baby's needs I freeze and donate.

    I haven't had much in the way of problems - a blocked duct once but that can happen with direct feeding too.

    It has cost me the price of a double electric pump and a few bottles - I haven't found it very pricey at all.

    I also snuggle my baby up close to my breast when I feed her, and hold the bottle right near my nipple, and she plays with my fingers and smiles at me while she drinks. I find feeding her an intensely pleasurable experience even though a bottle is part of the experience.

    I am not saying that exclusively pumping is preferable or that you should choose that route, only that it need not be a negative experience at all. My baby and I have found a way that works for us and we are both very contented.

    With my next child, I will put him or her to the breast too, but I wouldn't rule out pumping either part time or exclusively, if the situation was right.

    No one route is right for everyone, and another person's bad or good experience need not be your experience! Good luck with your choices

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    There are a few mothers who find it easier...but wait It gets much harder when baby is mobile. When you have more than one child. When you hit the 9 month wall and cant make enough milk to pump (and it does happen to just about everyone, even the moms who can nurse and get the extra stimulation). When you just get sick of it. Because you will. I have not ever met a single mother who did not count down to 12 months and when they could pump wean.

    Not sure how it hasn't cost you a lot of money. I bought extra of everything to make it easier to clean up. I was buying 300 bags a month to store my extra. I rented a hospital grade pump. I wore out several regular pumps too.

    Going out alone is not something exclusive to EPing. I do that too with a nursing baby. I prefer to take my babies with me, but it's possible.

    If you think bottlefeeding is pleasurable, wait until you can breastfeed. Once you work out the issues, it is so much easier and immensely more satisfying and delightful.

    Good luck.

    ETA: what I dislike most is that often, in the beginning, I had to choose whether or not to keep pumping or stop to comfort my baby. Who wanted ME. That pump will separate you, especially if you have NO HELP. I can see how EPing is easier for people who have one child and plenty of help. But we don't have grandma. Daddy works 16 hours a day. Unless you have help, that pump interferes with your relationship to your child. And people who have never breastfed don't get that.
    Last edited by @llli*aprilsmagic; June 7th, 2012 at 12:39 PM.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Maryland
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    I also saw some "good sides" to EPing, like that I donated milk, but I also did that when I was nursing my baby. Like Susan said, you can go out without a nursing baby too, otherwise I'm not sure how I would have started working full-time at 6 weeks with both my babies (the one I EPed for and the one I nursed."
    Beth

    Exclusively pumped for Lance Oct 07
    Nursed until just before he turned 3 Levi Oct 09

    Do you have extra milk? Consider donating!
    http://www.hmbana.org/:

    "So I was welcomed by the consolations of human milk; but it was not my mother or my nurses who made any decision to fill their breasts, but you who through them gave me infant food, in accordance with your ordinance and the riches which are distributed deep in the natural order." -St Augustine

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    I donated milk while nursing too also something else not exclusive to EPing. I nursed my own child and pumped for another mother's baby. This time, I donated enough milk to that same mother so she did not need any formula until her son was 6 months and he started refusing my milk because of excessive lipase. It was a side effect. I would never suggest EPing just so you can donate.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  8. #18
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    Mar 2006
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    Something that is not often talked about with EPing is the following:

    1. Bottles are not as good for oral development as breastfeeding. This was an issue for us, actually, to some extent.

    2. There is excellent research showing babies fed via bottles have a higher incidence of obesity secondary to lack of knowing their satiety limits. I have posted these articles here in the last 12 months or so.

    3. Nobody has really done a lot of firm research into how pumping alters the milk. Excessive or activated prematurely lipase is one such issue. Lipase can be a problem at any time. And it can destroy a pumping mom's self-esteem when baby starts refusing her milk. Correcting it damages the milk. I read once but could not find research to corroborate that pumped milk has less calcium than that of breastfed milk. We know the fats are damaged by handling. While better than formula, which is a live food, it can't equal direct in quality. I had to accept that mentally, that despite all my hard work, it was not the same nutritionally.

    4. We know that a breastfed baby gets a perfectly balanced milk that is right for him at that very moment. It literally changes from feeding to feeding and minute to minute to make sure baby gets the right amount of vitamins, minerals, antibodies, etc, stuff we don't even know about! That cannot happen if you never breastfeed.

    5. WHO, AAP, and all other medical communities consider pumped milk second best for all these reasons.

    It is one thing when you have to pump, like I did. When you are given no help to breastfeed or to overcome what stands between you and breastfeeding, like what happened to Beth, who was given horrible information and help. Katia relactsted but her son would not nurse. But my goal is that every mother who can does breastfeed directly. Too many default to pumping and dont get the help they need to succeed. And its not OK. Direct is best for her baby for so many reasons.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

  9. #19
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    May 2011
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    While I am so happy that you are able to successfully and happily pump for your baby and totally agree that everyone needs to do what is best for them, I don't think that this is true as a baby gets a little older:

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*camza View Post
    The pumping does require diligence and dedication, but then so does direct breastfeeding.
    Yes, breastfeeding requires dedication early on. For the first 8 weeks I would sit on my couch crying my eyes out because I was in severe pain, my baby was screaming at the breast, and I simply hated nursing him. But I learned how to treat my oversupply and overactive letdown and my baby got bigger and stronger and everything changed. Nursing became the easiest thing in the world, not to mention a warm, loving, bonding way of feeding my son.

    After about 4 months it didn't take any diligence or dedication at all really. It became a blessing. When we leave the house, the only thing I absolutely must remember is a clean diaper or two. That's it. And that's been pretty sweet. Pumping, on the other hand has only taken more diligence and dedication for me as time has passed. It's hard not to think about all of the other things you could be doing as you are hooked up to the pump.

    My only point is that you cannot compare nursing a newborn versus pumping for a newborn to nursing an older infant versus pumping for an older infant. Those are two completely different comparisons.
    K. Sophia - Mama to my little lactivore, the amazing Mr. X (11/10).

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Thinking about EPing

    Quote Originally Posted by @llli*phi View Post
    While I am so happy that you are able to successfully and happily pump for your baby and totally agree that everyone needs to do what is best for them, I don't think that this is true as a baby gets a little older:



    Yes, breastfeeding requires dedication early on. For the first 8 weeks I would sit on my couch crying my eyes out because I was in severe pain, my baby was screaming at the breast, and I simply hated nursing him. But I learned how to treat my oversupply and overactive letdown and my baby got bigger and stronger and everything changed. Nursing became the easiest thing in the world, not to mention a warm, loving, bonding way of feeding my son.

    After about 4 months it didn't take any diligence or dedication at all really. It became a blessing. When we leave the house, the only thing I absolutely must remember is a clean diaper or two. That's it. And that's been pretty sweet. Pumping, on the other hand has only taken more diligence and dedication for me as time has passed. It's hard not to think about all of the other things you could be doing as you are hooked up to the pump.

    My only point is that you cannot compare nursing a newborn versus pumping for a newborn to nursing an older infant versus pumping for an older infant. Those are two completely different comparisons.
    That last phrase is so, so true!!! It was kind of easy at times with a newborn. I didn't have to deal with cluster nursing in the evening, which is very common from birth to about 4 months old or thereabouts and can still crop up at milestones. I just pumped, handed daddy a bottle and kept rolling with my evening of dishes, clothes and chores postponed all day so I could pump and feed the baby while alone all day. But as time has gone one, it's just gotten harder. He wants to play with my pump (he doesn't nap but once a day, so pumping during naps is not enough). He kicks my bottles. He unplugs the tubes. Sure, you say just move the pump, but when they can stand, your choices are limited to going in the other room or standing up. Nursing a 4-6 month old is easy in comparison. Toddler nursing is easy peasy

    Don't feel like we are ganging up on you, but like if a mom of one toddler comes here and tells us older moms how to parent first graders, we are all going to roll our eyes a bit because that mom doesn't quite have the experience and knowledge base Glad you are having a good experience, but most moms who pump do say they feel like something is missing, and they regret not getting that IBCLC to help, or seeing the ENT sooner or whatever, and moms who have successfully breastfed and now are pumping always say this. Always. Because we know the difference.

    Dont get me wrong. I am grateful to have been able to provide for my cleft baby and that I am still able to provide for him. But I know it is second best.
    Susan
    Mama to my all-natural boys: Ian, 9-4-04, 11.5 lbs; Colton, 11-7-06, 9 lbs, in the water; Logan, 12-8-08, 9 lbs; Gavin, 1-18-11, 9 lbs; and an angel 1-15-06
    18+ months and for Gavin, born with an incomplete cleft lip and incomplete posterior cleft palate
    Sealed for time and eternity, 7-7-93
    Always babywearing, cosleeping and cloth diapering. Living with oppositional defiant disorder and ADHD. Ask me about cloth diapering and sewing your own diapers!

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